Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Master of Peace and Conflict Studies (MPCS)

Students celebrating

This qualification will also be temporarily delivered online in order to support international students that are unable to attend classes in 2022 in person due to COVID-19. For more information and criteria please visit the University's COVID-19 website.

Overview

The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Drawing upon national and international expertise in the field, this programme will position graduates for a wide range of career options in the public and private sectors as academic researchers and as practitioners and policy makers in fields such as conflict analysis and resolution, peace-building, and post-conflict transformation.

This programme (which replaces the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (PGDipArts) in Peace and Conflict Studies) combines theory and practice with a solid research component and is regionally focused on Asia and the Pacific.

^ Top of Page

Contact details

National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

Email peaceandconflict@otago.ac.nz
Website otago.ac.nz/humanities/ncpacs/

^ Top of Page

Subject area

^ Top of page

Programme requirements

Master of Peace and Conflict Studies (MPCS)

Papers Points

PEAC 501 Theories of Peace and Conflict

PEAC 502 Conflict Analysis and Conflict Resolution Theory

PEAC 590 Research Dissertation or PEAC 595 Practicum and Research Report

and two of

30

30

60

60

Total 180

Regulations for the Degree of Master of Peace and Conflict Studies (MPCS)

  1. Admission to the Programme

    1. Admission to the programme shall be subject to the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Humanities).
    2. Every applicant must either
      1. be a graduate, or
      2. have alternative qualifications or experience acceptable to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Humanities).
    3. In considering an applicant’s qualifications, regard will be had to the detail of the course of study that was followed to gain the qualification, as well as the applicant’s performance in the programme. A minimum grade of B+ or higher over the final year is normally required but relevant practical experience may also be considered where this minimum is not met.

  2. Structure of the Programme

    The programme of study shall consist of two core papers and two elective papers, worth 120 points, together with a 60 point research dissertation, or 60 point practicum and research project:

    PEAC 501 Theories of Peace and Conflict (30 points)
    PEAC 502 Conflict Analysis and Conflict Resolution Theory (30 points)
    PEAC 590 Research Dissertation (60 points) or PEAC 595 Practicum and Research Report (60 points)
    and two of
    PEAC 503 Conflict Resolution Practice (30 points)
    PEAC 504 Development and Peace-building (30 points)
    PEAC 505 Peace Education (30 points)
    PEAC 506 Special Topic (30 points)
    PEAC 507 Critical Terrorism Studies (30 points)
    PEAC 508 Psychology of Peace and Conflict (30 points)
    Total 180 points

  3. Duration of the Programme

    A full-time candidate shall normally complete the requirements of the degree within twelve months. A part-time candidate shall normally complete the requirements of the degree within twenty-four months.

  4. Examination of the Research Dissertation or Practicum Project and Research Report

    1. The Director, National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (or nominee) shall appoint a Convenor of Examiners who shall oversee the examination of each research dissertation or practicum project.
    2. The research dissertation shall be examined by at least two examiners, one of whom may be external to the University.
    3. The practicum project shall be examined by at least two examiners who are normally internal to the University, one of whom may be the Convenor.
    4. Where both examiners are internal to the University, the examined dissertation shall be subject to external moderation.
    5. The candidate’s supervisor shall not be an examiner.
    6. Each examiner shall supply a written report on the research dissertation and recommend a mark and grade on the basis of the work as submitted.
    7. Where the examiners cannot agree on a result, the Head of Programme should so report to the Pro-Vice Chancellor (Humanities) or nominee who shall arrive at a decision after consulting a referee who should normally be external to the University.

  5. Withdrawal from the Programme

    Where a candidate withdraws from the programme after completing the prescribed papers, but does not complete the research dissertation or practicum project, the Pro- Vice Chancellor (Humanities) or nominee may recommend the award of the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts Subjects, or determine which papers shall be credited towards the Diploma.

  6. Level of Award of the Degree

    The degree may be awarded with distinction or with credit.

  7. Variations

    The Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Humanities) may in exceptional circumstances approve a course of study which does not comply with these regulations.

    ^ Top of page