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DSM staff profile

Dr Kristin Kenrick

Position
  • Senior Lecturer and Deputy Head of Department
  • Associate Dean Medical Education
DepartmentDepartment of General Practice and Rural Health (Dunedin)
QualificationsBMedSci MB ChB DipObs FRNZCGP
Research summaryCoeliac disease in New Zealand, Medical education
TeachingConvenor of the 4th Year Medical Student attachment in General Practice, and teacher in 5th Year Rural Health attachment.
MembershipsMedical Advisory Panel for Coeliac New Zealand, and multiple committees in DSM and OMS associated with student learning and assessment.
ClinicalI am not currently in clinical practice but remain engaged with colleagues in General Practice

Research

My PhD research investigated the recognition, diagnosis and management of Coeliac Disease in New Zealand. It involved survey work and analysis of laboratory data, both of which research modalities continue to interest me. I am particularly interested in research that can be used to inform and, where necessary change the practice of clinicians in General Practice.

My second area of research interest is in Medical Education, with a focus on assessment.

Additional details

Teaching commitments and interests

I am heavily involved in the teaching of undergraduate medical students in the Advanced Learning in Medicine programme (years 4 - 6), with an emphasis on the practice of medicine in the primary care setting. My focus is on guiding these students to become good doctors, using the skills necessary to provide good primary care as the vehicle for their learning. I also have interests in assessment of medical student learning, and how we can do that robustly.

Publications

Kenrick, K., & Day, A. S. (2014). Coeliac disease: Where are we in 2014? Australian Family Physician, 43(10), 674-678.

Paterson, H., Kenrick, K., & Wilson, D. (2012). Teaching the Y generation obstetrics and gynaecology skills: A survey of medical students' thoughts on a new program. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 52(2), 151-155. doi: 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2012.01415.x

Williamson, M., Walker, T., Egan, T., Storr, E., Ross, J., & Kenrick, K. (2013). The Safe and Effective Clinical Outcomes (SECO) Clinic: Learning responsibility for patient care through simulation. Teaching & Learning in Medicine, 25(2), 155-158. doi: 10.1080/10401334.2013.772016