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DSM staff profile

Associate Professor Hamish Wilson

PositionAssociate Professor
DepartmentDepartment of General Practice and Rural Health (DSM)
QualificationsMB ChB MGP(Dist)(Otago) DipObst(Auck) MRNZCGP
Research summaryHealth and wellbeing of students and doctors, community based learning, reflective practice, professional development, undergraduate medical education, patient safety, inter-professional practice, somatisation disorder, and the role of Balint groups.
Teaching
  • Convener, Healthcare in the Community module, Early Learning in Medicine, Otago Medical School
  • Convener, Nature of Medical Practice (postgraduate paper)
Clinical

Dr Wilson works part-time in primary care at the Urgent Doctors Clinic in Dunedin.

Additional details

Short biography

Dr Hamish Wilson graduated from the University of Otago in 1978. He worked as a solo GP in Christchurch in the 1980s before taking up a part-time Senior Lecturer position in the Department of General Practice in 1996. He runs postgraduate courses for GPs and since 2008, he has helped to revise the Early Learning in Medicine programme for Year 2/3 students, convening the innovative Healthcare in the Community programme (HIC).

With Dr Wayne Cunningham, he recently published Being a Doctor: Understanding Medical Practice (University of Otago Press, 2013), a textbook that addresses the gap between medical theory and the reality of clinical practice. He has also researched and published on the doctor patient relationship, role modelling, complaints, and patients' experiences of health care. During his research and study leave in 2013, he travelled to Canada, USA and the UK to explore undergraduate curricula that address the health and wellbeing of medical students. He is married to Annette, has two adult children, and lives in Dunedin.

Publications

Mandic, S., Wilson, H., Clark-Grill, M., & O'Neill, D. (2018). A physical activity learning module improves medical students’ skills and confidence for advising patients about physical activity. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 7(1), 31-38. doi: 10.26773/mjssm.180304

Hawken, S. J., & Wilson, H. (2017). The doctor-patient relationship. In K. A. Morris (Ed.), Cole's medical practice in New Zealand. (13th ed.) (pp. 66-80). Wellington, New Zealand: Medical Council of New Zealand.

Mandic, S., Wilson, H., Clark-Grill, M., & O'Neill, D. (2017). Medical students' awareness of the links between physical activity and health. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 6(2), 5-12.

Wilson, H., & Chambers, S. (2015). How do junior medical students learn about the doctor patient relationship? International Journal of Whole Person Care, 2(2). doi: 10.26443/ijwpc.v2i2.97

Wilson, H. (2015). Challenges in the doctor–patient relationship: 12 tips for more effective peer group discussion. Journal of Primary Health Care, 7(3), 260-263. [Commentary].

Authored Book - Research

Wilson, H., & Cunningham, W. (2013). Being a doctor: Understanding medical practice. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 276p.

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Chapter in Book - Other

Hawken, S. J., & Wilson, H. (2017). The doctor-patient relationship. In K. A. Morris (Ed.), Cole's medical practice in New Zealand. (13th ed.) (pp. 66-80). Wellington, New Zealand: Medical Council of New Zealand.

Hawkins, S. J., & Wilson, H. (2013). The doctor patient relationship. In I. St George (Ed.), Cole's medical practice in New Zealand. (12th ed.) (pp. 36-43). Wellington, New Zealand: Medical Council of New Zealand.

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Journal - Research Article

Mandic, S., Wilson, H., Clark-Grill, M., & O'Neill, D. (2018). A physical activity learning module improves medical students’ skills and confidence for advising patients about physical activity. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 7(1), 31-38. doi: 10.26773/mjssm.180304

Mandic, S., Wilson, H., Clark-Grill, M., & O'Neill, D. (2017). Medical students' awareness of the links between physical activity and health. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 6(2), 5-12.

Wilson, H., & Chambers, S. (2015). How do junior medical students learn about the doctor patient relationship? International Journal of Whole Person Care, 2(2). doi: 10.26443/ijwpc.v2i2.97

Egnew, T. R., & Wilson, H. J. (2011). Role modeling the doctor-patient relationship in the clinical curriculum. Family Medicine, 43(2), 99-105.

Cunningham, W., & Wilson, H. (2011). Complaints, shame and defensive medicine. BMJ Quality & Safety, 20(5), 449-452. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs.2011.051722

Cunningham, W., & Wilson, H. (2011). Republished original viewpoint: Complaints, shame and defensive medicine. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 87(1034), 837-840. doi: 10.1136/pgmj.2011.051722rep

Egnew, T. R., & Wilson, H. J. (2010). Faculty and medical students' perceptions of teaching and learning about the doctor-patient relationship. Patient Education & Counseling, 79, 199-206. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.08.012

Perez, D., Rudland, J. R., Wilson, H., Roberton, G., Gerrard, D., & Wheatley, A. (2009). The revised 'Early Learning in Medicine' curriculum at the University of Otago: Focusing on students, patients, and community. New Zealand Medical Journal, 122(1292). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/122-1292/3540/content.pdf

Wilson, H. J., & Ayers, K. M. S. (2004). Using significant event analysis in dental and medical education. Journal of Dental Education, 68(4), 446-453.

Cunningham, W. K., & Wilson, H. J. (2003). Shame, guilt and the medical practitioner [Viewpoint]. New Zealand Medical Journal, 116(1183). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/116-1183/629/content.pdf

Jaye, C., & Wilson, H. J. (2003). When general practitioners become patients. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness & Medicine, 7(2), 201-225.

Wilson, H. J. (2001). Competing ideologies in substance abuse treatment. New Zealand Bioethics Journal, 2(3), 29-32.

Wilson, H. J. (2000). An integrated approach to consultation training using professional actors as simulated patients. Medical Teacher, 22(4), 370-379.

Wilson, H. J. (2000). Self-care for GPs: The role of supervision. New Zealand Family Physician, 27(5), 51-57.

Wilson, H. J. (2000). The myth of objectivity: Is medicine moving towards a social constructivist medical paradigm? Family Practice, 17, 203-209.

Wilson, H. J. (1995). Listening for the story. New Zealand Family Physician, 22, 2-6.

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Journal - Research Other

Wilson, H. (2015). Challenges in the doctor–patient relationship: 12 tips for more effective peer group discussion. Journal of Primary Health Care, 7(3), 260-263. [Commentary].

Crampton, P., Wilkinson, T., Anderson, L., Walthert, S., & Wilson, H. (2015). Bullying in health care settings: Time for a whole-of-system response. New Zealand Medical Journal, 128(1424). Retrieved from https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal

Mann, B., & Wilson, H. (2013). Diagnosing somatisation in adults in the first consultation: Moving beyond diagnosis by exclusion. British Journal of General Practice, 63(616), 607-608. doi: 10.3399/bjgp13X674602

Sweet, G. S., & Wilson, H. J. (2011). A patient's experience of ward rounds [Reflective practice]. Patient Education & Counseling, 84(2), 150-151. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2010.08.016

Wearn, A., Wilson, H., Hawken, S. J., Child, S., & Mitchell, C. J. (2010). In search of professionalism: Implications for medical education [Special series]. New Zealand Medical Journal, 123(1314). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/123-1314/4116/content.pdf

Wilson, H. (2006). Public and institutional responses to the 'missed' diagnosis in New Zealand [Viewpoint]. New Zealand Medical Journal, 119(1239). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/119-1239/2105/content.pdf

Wilson, H. (2005). Reflecting on the 'difficult' patient [Viewpoint]. New Zealand Medical Journal, 118(1212). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/118-1212/1384/content.pdf

Wilson, H. (2005). Complaints, hindsight bias, and the short-circuit of grief into grievance. New Zealand Family Physician, 32(5), 344-347.

Wilson, H. (2005). Co-locating primary care facilities within emergency departments: Brilliant innovation or unwelcome intervention into clinical care? [Viewpoint]. New Zealand Medical Journal, 118(1221). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/118-1221/1633/content.pdf

More publications...