Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Ashes to Ashes: An Evaluation of Public Response to the 1998 and 1999 Smoking Quit-Pack

Our task was to evaluate the Quit Smoking Pack designed by Ros MacGill.

The objectives of this task were:

  1. To obtain background information about these participants including demographic information and past and present smoking habits
  2. To obtain information about the usefulness of the packs and any resulting quit smoking behaviour.
  3. To relate the demographic information and smoking behaviour to local and national data.
  4. To make recommendations about further programmes of a similar nature.

Authors of Report

Katie Fay, David Hou, Nick Hutton, Ingrid Naden, Azizan Omar, Sandhya Pillai, Lai-Peng Tham

^ Top of Page

Cyberdoc: A Survey of General Practitioners' Use of the Internet in the Otago/Southland Area

To determine the use of the internet for medical and personal use by local General Practitioners.

  1. To determine if patients seeking doctors advice are using the internet as a alternative source of medical information.
  2. To explore the attitude of local General Practitioners towards the medical information available on the internet, and how they perceive it affecting the doctor-patient relationship.
  3. To detect common demographic characteristics of doctors who use the internet for medical information.

Authors of Report

Richard Ng, Joanna Lambert, Martha Nicholson, Lorna Rankin and Sarah Jenkins

^ Top of Page

Fingers in the Firing Line: Needle Stick Injuries on Farms

This study investigates the risks to farmers of needlestick injuries and the treatment options they use following injury.  We investigated this with a postal survey to 750 people randomly selected from the 1998 electoral roll who had self identified as being in farming type occupations.  We received replies from 42% of these people; 32% were applicable to our study.  A risk of 3.3/10,000 injections for sheep, 6.1/10,000 injections for cattle and 9.2/10,000 for deer was demonstrated.  Only 5% of those with an injury sought further health care or information.

Authors of Report

Jennifer Hill, Sarah Jordan, Irene Low, Jonathan Potter, Jeremy Stanley, Lisa Williamson

^ Top of Page

Genetically Modified Foods

Aims

  • To assess the public’s perception of genetically modified foods
  • What issues are important to the New Zealand public?
  • To determine their sources of information

Authors of Report

Matthew Ludgate, Timothy Currie, Andrew Cho, Andrew Dunkley, Karen Po, Michelle Reeves, Dumindu Jayasinghe and Brad Hockey

^ Top of Page

North and South: A Comparison of Admissions into the Acute Psychiatric Wards by Geographical Area in Otago

Abstract

Does a difference exist between North and South Dunedin acute psychiatric admission rates?

This study investigates whether a difference in admission rates exists and, if so, what factors or characteristics might explain the difference.

We investigated this, by analyzing acute admissions data collected from November 1998 to March 1999.  With the admissions data and population data from Census 1996, we calculated and compared admission rates.  We calculated three different admissions rates, using three difference sources of data on the number of admissions.  Using the hospital admission data there was no significant difference in rates.  Using the ward book data, which we think might be most accurate, we found the North area to have a significantly higher admission rate than the South area.

Using Census 1996 data, the deprivation index, and information on Community Mental Health Services, we found this difference could be explained.  Further work should be undertaken to investigate the accuracy of the admission data.

Authors of Report

Jane Fielder, Salesh Sharma, Fiona Morris, Stewart Allan, Ya Shu Chang, Kylie McGregor

^ Top of Page

Otago/Southland Cervical Smear Acceptability Research Study (OSCAR Study)

Abstract

Although a large proportion (86%) of eligible women are enrolled in the National cervical Screening Programme (NSCP), a significant number of women (7%) fail to have continuing coverage through regular follow-up smears.  In order to explore ways to optimize continuing coverage, the Otago and Southland Cervical Screening Programme asked us to evaluate the acceptability and potential barriers to attendances of follow-up cervical smears.  Further objectives were to investigate women’s general knowledge of the NCSP schedule and whether guidelines for cervical smear taking were being followed by smear takers.

Two groups of European women enrolled on the NCSP were surveyed by postal questionnaire – an “up-to-date” group of women who have had their last cervical smear taken within a year of the due date; and an “overdue” group who were more than one year overdue in having their smear taken.  A total of 300 women in each group were sent a questionnaire and the overall response rate was 51% with the “up-to-date” women much more likely to respond to the questionnaire than the “overdue” women (85% vs 32%).

Results showed a very significant difference in the gender of the person taking the last smear.  The women in the “overdue” group were far more likely to have had a male smear taker than the “up-to-date” group (44% VS 28%, P=.0086.).  However, two-thirds of the women in both groups preferred a female smear taker.  About a third of women in both groups had no preference and very few (2%) in both groups preferred a male smear taker.  Embarrassment and anxiety about the procedure were significantly higher in the “overdue” group.  When the smear taker was male, the “overdue” women were considerably more anxious, embarrassed and more likely to find the procedure unacceptable.  The gender of the smear taker was not an important factor influencing the feeling and acceptability of the procedure in the “up-to-date” group of women.

There were no significant differences between groups in age, locality or distance to clinic where the smears were taken.  Likewise, the two groups were similar in regarding that smears were taken with adequate privacy and respect, with the purpose of the procedure being explained well and having their questions answered.  More women in the “up-to-date” group compared to the “overdue” group (43% vs 30%) were aware that cervical smears are taken every three years in women with normal smears.  Neither group felt that barriers such as cost, time consumed, access to clinic, or loss of pay from work kept them from getting a follow-up smear.

Our study shows that emotional rather than physical barriers may be responsible for women’s reluctance to have repeat cervical smears.  The most interesting finding was the association between male gender of the last smear taker and negative feelings in the overdue women.

Authors of Report

Michael Herd, James Jap, Eric Khoo, Sally Rimkeit, Caroline Tsai, Winnie Wong

^ Top of Page

Residential Care and Respite Care for Younger Physically Disabled Adults

Abstract

The aims of this study were to examine the numbers of people under sixty five in the Dunedin and Mosgiel area with severe physical disability and compare the residential and respite care options provided both here and overseas.  We also attempted to determine satisfaction with care provided and the level of demand for these services in Dunedin and Mosgiel.  The methods we used to approach these issues included open-ended interview with people with disabilities, their carers and people involved with care of the disabled; correspondence with the Health Funding Authoirty, and a literature review.

Extrapolating from existing data we found there are 1530 people with some disability requiring daily assistance between the ages of 15-64 years in the Dunedin/Mosgiel region for all ages.  International literature suggests a shift to more community-based care for the severely disabled that is reflected here in NZ.

Overall we interviewed 38 people who were either in residential care, receiving intermittent hospital “respite” care, or receiving home based services.  We also interviewed 11 people who helped to care for a family member.

In terms of residential care we found a high level of satisfaction with the facilities of the St Judes Trust houses.  Levels of satisfaction with the new ISIS facility at Wakari Hospital was more mixed, but everyone who had experienced the previous Ward 2 accommodation reported that the ISIS Centre was an improvement.  The main problem perceived was a lack of a range of staff to meet the residents’ needs.  Nursing staff were highly regarded but not always available.  There was also a lack of physiotherapy.

“Respite” care was valued by users of the service and relatives as a way of giving carers a break.  There were some criticisms of the physical environment at Wakari and, again, experience that the facility was understaffed.  The respite timing was also found to be too inflexible to cater for people’s changing health and social needs.  The rehabilitation aspects of the respite stay, and the social contact were especially appreciated.

For people living at home, the costs of transport and home help were both an issue.  At present home help is funded only for those with Community Services Cards.  This should be looked at further, because of the extra costs associated with severe disability.  With major changes to the health service, there is uncertainty about the various services available for people with disabilities.  General practitioners need to know to refer people to advocacy groups like the Multiple Sclerosis Society for information.

Our main recommendations are first that there should be new long-term care facilities developed for younger severely disabled adults in Dunedin, using the St Judes Trust as a model.  Secondly, we recommend that serious consideration be given to a new combined inpatient rehabilitation/respite service which would explicitly meet the goals of rehabilitation as well as carer relief.

Authors of Report

Edrin Abdul Rasib, Scott Adams, Poh Jaun Chai, Iliza Idris, Suhaila Omar, Ralph Scorgie, Gavin Watson, Azmil Zabir

^ Top of Page

Use It or Lose It!  A Survey of General Practitioner Awareness of the Arthritis Foundation

The aims of this study were to:

  1. Access G.P. awareness of the Arthritis Foundation and its services amongst Otago general practitioners
  2. Determine factors influencing G.p’s referral and non-referral patterns of patients to the Arthritis Foundation.

The ultimate goal of this study and these aims was to provide the arthritis foundation with information which would enable them to increase G.P. awareness of the foundation, and thereby to potentially increase the number of G.P. referrals.

Authors of Report

Chris Haslett, James McCormick, Hamish McKee, Matthew Shaw, Maylin Yap, Andrew Ure

^ Top of Page