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Dr Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin 2020 image 1xSenior Lecturer, Coordinator (Māori/Kaiwhakahaere)
BEd(Otago) MEd PhD(Cant) DipTchg(DCE) GDipHP CAT(ChCh CE) TTC

Dunedin Campus
Tel +64 3 479 4920
Email rachel.s.martin@otago.ac.nz

Biography and Research Interests

Dr Rachel Martin affiliates to the Waitaha, Kāti Mamoe and Ngāi Tahu tribe in the South Island from Kaikōura to Rākiura. My research is inclusive of culturally and linguistically sustaining te tiriti based frameworks for all participants.

My research interests are based on making a difference for Māori communities. I completed my PhD in 2017 which investigated how parents who are second language learners and speakers of te reo Māori nurture their children as Māori in the region of Christchurch. Regional research is vital for language growth, and significant in language revitalisation efforts.

One of the aims of Ngāi Tahu and other government agencies is to improve the intergenerational transmission of te reo Māori and speaking Māori in the home to ensure the survival of te reo. Speaking te reo Māori in the home and in the educational environment is vital to its survival.

I am currently working on a TLRI (Teaching and Learning Research Initiative) with researchers from University of Canterbury which uses a collaborative approach to socio-emotional wellbeing is guided by Kaupapa Māori research principles, involving teachers, whānau, hapū, and iwi. This aims research aims to support teachers to enhance and sustain student wellbeing in the classroom, through socio-emotional learning (SEL) education. It will enable teachers to develop and integrate these SEL strategies within their programmes to enhance support for the identities, languages and cultures of their students. I am also part of a collaborative team completing research looking at bilingual development in early literacy skills at Tuahiwi school as part of the Better Start Literacy and Learning theme National Science Challenge project.

I am a trained primary teacher and my focus is on Māori education and the importance of te reo Māori in all primary schools. Current research also focuses on the development of te reo Māori in College of Education courses. I have worked at Canterbury University College of Education since 1999 and joined the Dunedin College of Education University of Otago in 2019.

Teaching Sectors

  • Undergraduate and Postgraduate
  • Primary Education
  • Teaching Areas
  • Te reo Māori in English medium schools
  • Social Science
  • Learning Languages
  • Inclusive Education


Research Interests

  • Bilingual education
  • Māori Education
  • Intergenerational transmission of te reo Māori
  • Intergenerational trauma and historical trauma
  • Socio-emotional wellbeing for Māori in Aotearoa
  • Kaupapa Māori research
  • Primary teacher education
  • Te reo Māori on line learning
  • Indigenous education

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Publications

Martin, R., Denston, A., Hochstrasser Fickel, L., & O'Toole, V. (2021). Understanding how teacher perceive socio-emotional wellbeing (SEW) in themselves and their students: Contributing to the development of a linguistically and culturally responsive SEW framework in Aotearoa New Zealand. Proceedings of the 13th Educational Psychology Forum. MAR21215. Retrieved from http://www.eenz.com/epf

Fickel, L. C., Denston, A., Martin, R., & O'Toole, V. M. (2020). Collaborating for children's well-being: Families, teachers, and researchers co-constructing a framework for socio-emotional learning. Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting: The Power and Possibilities for the Public Good. Retrieved from https://www.aera.net

Martin, R., Astall, C., Jones, K.-L., & Breeze, D. (2020). An indigenous approach to self-study of teacher education practices (S-STEP) in Aotearoa New Zealand. Studying Teacher Education, 16(2), 127-144. doi: 10.1080/17425964.2020.1732911

O'Toole, V., & Martin, R. (2019). The role of emotions in education in Aotearoa. In A. Kamp (Ed.), Education studies in Aotearoa: Key disciplines and emerging directions. (pp. 179-200). Wellington, New Zealand: NZCER Press.

O'Toole, V. M., Martin, R., Fickel, L., & Britt, E. (2019). Emotional wellbeing as perceived and understood through the lenses of SEL and PYD: A qualitative commentary and suggestions for future research in Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 48(2), 91-102.

O'Toole, V., & Martin, R. (2019). The role of emotions in education in Aotearoa. In A. Kamp (Ed.), Education studies in Aotearoa: Key disciplines and emerging directions. (pp. 179-200). Wellington, New Zealand: NZCER Press.

Chapter in Book - Research

Martin, R., Astall, C., Jones, K.-L., & Breeze, D. (2020). An indigenous approach to self-study of teacher education practices (S-STEP) in Aotearoa New Zealand. Studying Teacher Education, 16(2), 127-144. doi: 10.1080/17425964.2020.1732911

Journal - Research Article

O'Toole, V. M., Martin, R., Fickel, L., & Britt, E. (2019). Emotional wellbeing as perceived and understood through the lenses of SEL and PYD: A qualitative commentary and suggestions for future research in Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 48(2), 91-102.

Journal - Research Article

Martin, R., & Williams, J. (2012). "I feel I'm important": Successful collaborative teaching and learning in a New Zealand intermediate school. RMLE Online, 36(2), 1-13. doi: 10.1080/19404476.2012.11462095

Journal - Research Article

Martin, R., Denston, A., Hochstrasser Fickel, L., & O'Toole, V. (2021). Understanding how teacher perceive socio-emotional wellbeing (SEW) in themselves and their students: Contributing to the development of a linguistically and culturally responsive SEW framework in Aotearoa New Zealand. Proceedings of the 13th Educational Psychology Forum. MAR21215. Retrieved from http://www.eenz.com/epf

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Fickel, L. C., Denston, A., Martin, R., & O'Toole, V. M. (2020). Collaborating for children's well-being: Families, teachers, and researchers co-constructing a framework for socio-emotional learning. Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting: The Power and Possibilities for the Public Good. Retrieved from https://www.aera.net

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Denston, A., & Martin, R. (2019). Exploring the braiding together of te reo Māori and English literacies: Creating a sustaining community of learners. Te Hā o te Takata: Proceedings of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference. DEN19171. Retrieved from http://www.eenz.com/nzare19/

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Fickel, L., O'Toole, V. M., Martin, R., & Denston, A. (2019). Exploring teaching and learning for socio-emotional wellbeing. Te Hā o te Takata: Proceedings of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference. FIC19080. Retrieved from http://www.eenz.com/nzare19/

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Martin, R., Fickel, L., O'Toole, V. M., & Denston, A. (2019). Co-constructing a framework for socio-emotional well-being in children in Years 5 to 9: A Te Tiriti based Ako approach. Te Hā o te Takata: Proceedings of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference. MAR19131. Retrieved from http://www.eenz.com/nzare19/

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Martin, R., Astall, C., Jones, K.-L., & Breeze, D. (2018). Te ao o Pakirehua: Challenging perspectives of inquiry for primary initial teacher educators. Proceedings of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference. (pp. 60). Retrieved from http://www.nzareconference.org.nz

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Martin, R. (2017). Successful strategies for language regeneration, nurturing Māori/English bilingualism. Proceedings of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference: Partnerships: From promise to praxis. (pp. 54). Retrieved from http://www.nzare.org.nz/conference2017.aspx

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Martin, R., Hochstrasser Fickel, L., O'Toole, V., & Britt, E. (2017). Making the unseen seen: Using a Treaty framework to support holistic wellbeing in education. Proceedings of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) Conference: Partnerships: From promise to praxis. (pp. 43-44). Retrieved from http://www.nzare.org.nz/conference2017.aspx

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Martin, R. (2015). What narratives emerge as Māori parents seek to revitalize Māori language with their children? Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Language, Education and Diversity (LED). (pp. 47). Retrieved from https://led.education.auckland.ac.nz

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Howard, J., Martin, R., & Scott, A. (2014, October). In and beyond the classroom: An evaluation of tools for language learning and teaching. Poster session presented at the Learning and Teaching Languages Symposium, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Conference Contribution - Poster Presentation (not in published proceedings)

Howard, J., Scott, A., & Martin, R. (2013, July). A multifaceted approach to language teaching and learning. Verbal presentation at the Australian Federation of Modern Language Teachers Association (AFMLTA) National Conference, Canberra, Australia.

Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

Martin, R. (2011, November). Mai i tētahi whakatipuraka ki tētahi atu: Ka pēhea? From one generation to the next: How? Verbal presentation at the Proceedings of the 3rd Language, Education and Diversity (LED) International Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

Martin, R. (2016). Te whakarauora reo nō tuawhakarere: Giving our children what we missed out on: Māori language revitalistion for Māori/English bilingualism (PhD). University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10092/13291

Awarded Doctoral Degree

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