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Research in Tanzania

Impact and social ecology of bacterial zoonoses in northern Tanzania (BZ)

John Crump

Funder: US National Institutes of Health

BZ launch meeting team photo
Participants in bacterial zoonoses project launch meeting, Moshi, Tanzania, 20 February 2012.

Description: The bacterial zoonoses leptospirosis, Q fever, and brucellosis are major causes of human non-malaria febrile illness in northern Tanzania. They are difficult to distinguish clinically from malaria and reliable diagnostic tests are not available. The bacterial zoonoses also have major impacts of livestock productivity, in turn influencing the economic wellbeing of families who depend on them.

This project seeks to measure incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for human leptospirosis, Q fever, and brucellosis in northern Tanzania through studying febrile inpatients. The project also seeks to understand infection in human communities and related livestock populations in pastoralist, small-holder, and per-urban agro-ecologic zones through quantitate and social science research.

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Typhoid fever surveillance in Africa program (TSAP)

A laboratory technologist checks blood cultures
A laboratory technologist checks blood cultures in the continuously monitored blood culture instrument.

John Crump

Funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Description: Typhoid fever disease burden is poorly understood in Africa. This project seeks to measure typhoid fever incidence at sites in sub-Saharan Africa to inform policy decisions about use of typhoid fever vaccines and other prevention strategies.

Typhoid fever cases are identified at healthcare facilities using blood culture; healthcare utilization surveys are used to develop multipliers for cases identified at sentinel sites.

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Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training (WEIGHT)

John Crump

Funder: Wellcome Trust

Description: Many universities in high-income countries have established global health institutes; students increasingly request training experiences in low- and middle-income countries. Such experiences raise a range of ethical concerns.

The Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training (WEIGHT) identifies ethics concerns and develops guidelines for mitigation of these concerns.

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