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Professor Colin Gavaghan

LLB(Hons) PhD(Glas)

staff_large_gavaghan_colin

Director of the New Zealand Law Foundation Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies

Contact

Mob +64 21 222 0878
Office: 7th Floor – 7c26
Email colin.gavaghan@otago.ac.nz

Teaching

Professor Colin Gavaghan lectures on medical and criminal law.

Research interests

Colin is the first director of the New Zealand Law Foundation sponsored Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies. The Centre examines the legal, ethical and policy issues around new technologies. To date, the Centre has carried out work on biotechnology, nanotechnology, information and communication technologies and artificial intelligence.

In addition to emerging technologies, Colin lectures and writes on medical and criminal law.

Together with colleagues in Computer Science and Philosophy, Colin is the leader of a three-year project exploring the legal, ethical and social implications of artificial intelligence for New Zealand.

Background

Colin regularly advises on matters of technology and regulation. He is first Chair of the NZ Police’s Advisory Panel on Emergent Technologies, and a member of the Digital Council for Aotearoa, which advises the Government on digital technologies. Since 2017, he has been a member (and more recently Deputy Chair) of the Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology. He was an expert witness in the High Court case of Seales v Attorney General, and has advised members of parliament on draft legislation.

He is a frustrated writer of science fiction, but compensates with occasional appearances on panels at SF conventions.

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Publications

Zerilli, J., with, Danaher, J., Maclaurin, J., Gavaghan, C., Knott, A., Liddicoat, J., & Noorman, M. (2021). A citizen's guide to artificial intelligence. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 104p.

Dawson, A., Chandler, J., Gavaghan, C., Hall, W., & Carter, A. (2020). Judicious use of neuropsychiatric evidence when sentencing offenders with addictive behvaiors. In N. A. Vincent, T. Nadelhoffer & A. McCay (Eds.), Neurointerventions and the law: Regulating human mental capacity. (pp. 231-251). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oso/9780190651145.003.0010

White, B. P., Willmott, L., Downie, J., Geddis, A., & Gavaghan, C. (2020). Assisted dying and evidence-based law-making: A critical analysis of an article's role in New Zealand's referendum. New Zealand Medical Journal, 133(1520), 90-97. Retrieved from https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal

Gavaghan, C., Knott, A., Maclaurin, J., Zerilli, J., & Liddicoat, J. (2019). Government use of artificial intelligence in New Zealand: Final report on phase 1 of the New Zealand Law Foundation’s Artificial Intelligence and Law in New Zealand Project. Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand Law Foundation. 86p. Retrieved from https://www.otago.ac.nz/caipp/otago711816.pdf

Ballantyne, A., Gavaghan, C., & Snelling, J. (2019). Doctors' rights to conscientiously object to refer patients to abortion service providers. New Zealand Medical Journal, 132(1499), 64-71. Retrieved from https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal

Zerilli, J., with, Danaher, J., Maclaurin, J., Gavaghan, C., Knott, A., Liddicoat, J., & Noorman, M. (2021). A citizen's guide to artificial intelligence. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 104p.

Authored Book - Research

Dawson, A., Chandler, J., Gavaghan, C., Hall, W., & Carter, A. (2020). Judicious use of neuropsychiatric evidence when sentencing offenders with addictive behvaiors. In N. A. Vincent, T. Nadelhoffer & A. McCay (Eds.), Neurointerventions and the law: Regulating human mental capacity. (pp. 231-251). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oso/9780190651145.003.0010

Chapter in Book - Research

White, B. P., Willmott, L., Downie, J., Geddis, A., & Gavaghan, C. (2020). Assisted dying and evidence-based law-making: A critical analysis of an article's role in New Zealand's referendum. New Zealand Medical Journal, 133(1520), 90-97. Retrieved from https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C., Knott, A., Maclaurin, J., Zerilli, J., & Liddicoat, J. (2019). Government use of artificial intelligence in New Zealand: Final report on phase 1 of the New Zealand Law Foundation’s Artificial Intelligence and Law in New Zealand Project. Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand Law Foundation. 86p. Retrieved from https://www.otago.ac.nz/caipp/otago711816.pdf

Working Paper; Discussion Paper; Technical Report

Ballantyne, A., Gavaghan, C., & Snelling, J. (2019). Doctors' rights to conscientiously object to refer patients to abortion service providers. New Zealand Medical Journal, 132(1499), 64-71. Retrieved from https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal

Journal - Research Other

Gavaghan, C. (2017). Lex Machina: Techno-regulatory mechanisms and 'rules by design'. Otago Law Review, 15(1), 123-145.

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2017). Capacity and assisted dying. In M. J. Cholbi (Ed.), Euthanasia and assisted suicide: Global views on choosing to end life. (pp. 299-325). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C. (2016). Reproductive technologies and the search for regulatory legitimacy: Fuzzy lines, decaying consensus, and intractable normative problems. In R. Brownsword, E. Scotford & K. Yeung (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of the law and regulation of technology. (Online ed.) (pp. 992-1013). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199680832.013.62

Chapter in Book - Research

Liddicoat, J., Gavaghan, C., Knott, A., Maclaurin, J., & Zerilli, J. (2019). The use of algorithms in the New Zealand public sector. New Zealand Law Journal, (February), 26-36.

Journal - Research Article

Geddis, A., & Gavaghan, C. (2016). Aid in dying in New Zealand: Recent legal developments. Journal of Law & Medicine, 23, 849-863.

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2016). Stopping suicide after Seales. New Zealand Criminal Law Review, 4-18.

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2017). Commentary on Hallagan v Medical Council of New Zealand. Whose choice, whose conscience? In E. McDonald, R. Powell, M. Stephens & R. Hunter (Eds.), Feminist judgements of Aotearoa New Zealand: Te Rino: A two-stranded rope. (pp. 143-151). Oxford, UK: Hart.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C., & King, M. (2016). Can facilitated aid in dying be permitted by 'double effect'? Some reflections from a recent New Zealand case. Journal of Medical Ethics, 42(6), 361-366. doi: 10.1136/medethics-2016-103411

Journal - Research Article

Ballantyne, A., Gavaghan, C., McMillan, J., & Pullon, S. (2016). Pregnancy and the culture of extreme risk aversion. American Journal of Bioethics, 16(2), 21-23. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2015.1120801

Journal - Research Other

Gavaghan, C. (2015). In word, or sigh, or tear: Depression and end-of-life choices. In P. R. Ferguson & G. T. Laurie (Eds.), Inspiring a medico-legal revolution: Essays in honour of Sheila McLean. (pp. 231-253). Farnham, UK: Ashgate.

Chapter in Book - Research

Snelling, J., & Gavaghan, C. (2015). PGD past and present: Is the HFE Act 1990 now 'fit for purpose'? In K. Horsey (Ed.), Revisiting the regulation of human fertilisation and embryology. (pp. 80-97). London, UK: Routledge.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C. (2013). Neuroscience, deviant appetites, and the criminal law. In N. A. Vincent (Ed.), Neuroscience and legal responsibility. (pp. 205-226). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C., & Bastani, A. (2014). Genes, blame and loss of control: Is there a place in criminal law for a 'genetic defense'? Recent Advances in DNA & Gene Sequences, 8, 119-125. doi: 10.2174/2352092209666150216122554

Journal - Research Article

King, M., Gavaghan, C., & McMillan, J. (2014). Medical regulation of cognitive enhancement devices: Some concerns. Journal of Law & the Biosciences, 1(3), 334-339. doi: 10.1093/jlb/lsu020

Journal - Research Other

Gavaghan, C., & Hedley, H. (2014). Death and dying: Legal issues elders may encounter. In K. Diesfeld & I. McIntosh (Eds.), Elder law in New Zealand. (pp. 111-146). Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C. (2007). Defending the genetic supermarket: The law and ethics of selecting the next generation. Abingdon, UK: Routledge-Cavendish, 248p.

Authored Book - Research

Gavaghan, C., & King, M. (2013). Reporting suicide: Safety isn't everything. Journal of Primary Health Care, 5(1), 82-85. doi: 10.1071/HC13082

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2012). Public voices or private choices? The role of public consultation in the regulation of reproductive technologies. In K. O'Doherty & E. Einsiedel (Eds.), Public engagement and emerging technologies. (pp. 80-96). Vancouver, Canada: University of British Columbia Press.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C., & Moore, J. (2011). De minimis curat lex: New Zealand law and the challenge of the very small. European Journal of Law & Technology, 2(3). Retrieved from http://ejlt.org/article/view/97/160

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2009). ″You can't handle the truth″: Medical paternalism and prenatal alcohol use. Journal of Medical Ethics, 35, 300-303. doi: 10.1136/jme.2008.028662

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2007). A Tarasoff for Europe? A European human rights perspective on the duty to protect. International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, 30(3), 255-267. doi: 10.1016/j.ijlp.2007.01.001

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2007). Right problem, wrong solution: A pro-choice response to ″expressivist″ concerns about preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 16, 20-34. doi: 10.1017/S096318010707003X

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C., & Moore, J. (2011). A review of the adequacy of New Zealand's regulatory systems to manage the possible impacts of manufactured nanomaterials. Commissioned by Ministry of Research, Science and Technology. 120p.

Commissioned Report for External Body

Gavaghan, C. (2010). General end of life rights and ethical issues (33 pages). In C. Whitehouse (Ed.), Finance and law for the older client. United Kingdom: LexisNexis.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C. (2010). A whole new... you? 'Personal identity', emerging technologies and the law. IDIS, 3, 423-434. doi: 10.1007/s12394-010-0077-4

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2010). Regulating after Parfit: Welfare, identity and the UK embryology law. In M. Goodwin, B.-J. Koops & R. Leenes (Eds.), Dimensions of technology regulation. (pp. 147-164). Nijmegen, The Netherlands: Wolf Legal. [Full Paper]

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Full paper

Gavaghan, C. (2010, November). The stuff of other lives: Personal identity, genetics and the law. Invited presentation at the Genetics Otago Symposium, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

Gavaghan, C. (2009). ″No gene for fate?″: Luck, harm, and justice in Gattaca. In S. Shapshay (Ed.), Bioethics at the movies. (pp. 75-86). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Chapter in Book - Research

Gavaghan, C. (2008). End of life decision making in the context of UK law. Revista de Direito Médico e da Saúde, IV(14), 111-130.

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2007/2008). Disability, identity and choice: Embryo testing and the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008. Contemporary Issues in Law, 9(3), 133-152.

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C. (2007). Dangerous patients and duties to warn: A European human rights perspective. European Journal of Health Law, 14(2), 113-130.

Journal - Research Article

Gavaghan, C., Snelling, J., & McMillan, J. (2014). Better and better and better? A legal and ethical analysis of preventive detention in New Zealand. Commissioned by New Zealand Law Foundation. Dunedin, New Zealand: University of Otago. 94p.

Commissioned Report for External Body

Gavaghan, C. (2015). Saviour siblings: No avoiding the hard questions [Author meets critics: Response]. Journal of Medical Ethics, 41(12), 931-932. doi: 10.1136/medethics-2014-102605

Journal - Research Other

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