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Dr Simon Connell

staff_large_connell_simonLLB, LLM, PhD (Otago)

Simon has two main areas of research: Contract Law and Accidents and the Law. Simon’s teaching has focused on those same topics.

Within Contract Law, Simon is especially interested in the law of contract interpretation and how it interacts with other areas of contract law, which was the topic of his PhD. Simon’s research has also addressed other contract law topics, including the rule against penalties, the doctrine of non est factum, and the relationship between contract law and contractual practice.

Simon’s “Accidents and the Law” research is broadly concerned with how different areas of the law respond to the same ‘accident’ events, the different conceptions of a just outcome that sit behind those different areas of law, and how we resolve any conflicts between them. For example, a workplace accident could lead to compensation for the victim through New Zealand’s no-fault accident compensation scheme, an investigation under our workplace health and safety regime leading to the employer being convicted and ordered to pay reparation to the victim, and a possible tort claim for exemplary damages in negligence.

Simon joined the Faculty in 2014, before which he was a postgraduate student (LLM and then PhD) at Otago. Prior to that, Simon worked for the Accident Compensation Corporation.

Simon is the Faculty of Law Honours Coordinator.

Research Interests


Accidents and the Law, Accident Compensation, No-Fault, Tort Law, Contract Law, Contract Interpretation, Law of Obligations Theory, Private Law Theory, Negligence

Contact 

Tel: +64 3 479 3781
Office: 9th Floor - 9C13
Email: simon.connell@otago.ac.nz

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Publications

Connell, S. (2018). Prescriptive and holistic contextualism: Emerging variants of modern contract interpretation. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 28(2), 317-347.

Shaw, W., & Connell, S. (2018). Rock Advertising v MWB in the UK Supreme Court: "No oral variation" clauses can be enforceable. New Zealand Law Journal, (7), 198-200.

Connell, S. (2018). Is an "outward expression of accord" required for rectification in New Zealand? New Zealand Law Journal, (6), 186-188, 194.

Cathro, S., & Connell, S. (2017). New variations on the rule against penalties: Options for New Zealand. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 27(4B), 1087-1110.

Connell, S., & Peart, N. (2017). Accident compensation entitlements under the Property (Relationships) Act 1976. Otago Law Review, 15(1), 169-196.

Chapter in Book - Research

Connell, S. (2016). Contract law, contracting and instrumentalism. In S. Griffiths, M. Henaghan & M. B. Rodriguez Ferrere (Eds.), The search for certainty: Essays in honour of John Smillie. (pp. 99-128). Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters.

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Journal - Research Article

Connell, S. (2018). Prescriptive and holistic contextualism: Emerging variants of modern contract interpretation. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 28(2), 317-347.

Connell, S. (2018). Is an "outward expression of accord" required for rectification in New Zealand? New Zealand Law Journal, (6), 186-188, 194.

Shaw, W., & Connell, S. (2018). Rock Advertising v MWB in the UK Supreme Court: "No oral variation" clauses can be enforceable. New Zealand Law Journal, (7), 198-200.

Cathro, S., & Connell, S. (2017). New variations on the rule against penalties: Options for New Zealand. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 27(4B), 1087-1110.

Connell, S., & Peart, N. (2017). Accident compensation entitlements under the Property (Relationships) Act 1976. Otago Law Review, 15(1), 169-196.

Connell, S. (2017). Interpretation and implication. New Zealand Law Journal, 2, 71-75.

Connell, S. (2016). Admissibility or weight? [Response to the article The interpretation of registered instruments]. New Zealand Law Journal, 8, 304-305, 321.

Connell, S. (2016). Not my doctrine? Finding a contract law explanation for non est factum. Victoria University of Wellington Law Review, 47, 245-265.

Cathro, S., & Connell, S. (2016). Radical change to the rule against penalties in England. New Zealand Law Journal, 7, 271-272.

Connell, S. (2015). A shift from Belize to Singapore? Interpretation and implication in Satterthwaite v Gough. New Zealand Law Journal, 7, 263-265.

Connell, S. (2015). Chronic pain, physical injury and mental injury. New Zealand Law Journal, 11, 425-427.

Connell, S. (2014). Overturning the social contract? New Zealand Law Journal, 8, 314-315, 320.

Connell, S. (2012). Intrusion upon seclusion. New Zealand Law Journal, 9, 315-316.

Connell, S. (2012). Sex as an "accident". New Zealand Law Journal, (6), 188-189.

Connell, S. (2012). ACC infects the criminal law? New Zealand Law Journal, 4, 135-136.

Connell, S. (2012). Justice for victims of injury: The influence of New Zealand's accident compensation scheme on the civil and criminal law. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 25(2), 181-209.

Connell, S. (2012). Westpac v Chahil: Sometimes words just mean what they say. Australian Business Law Review, 40, 213-216.

Connell, S. (2011). What is the place of corrective justice in criminal justice? Waikato Law Review, 19(2), 134-144.

Connell, S. (2011). Unwritten constitutions of incorporated societies: A critical examination of the treatment of tikanga in Tamaki v Māori Women's Welfare League Inc. Otago Law Review, 12(3), 605-624.

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Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

France-Hudson, B., & Connell, S. (2017, December). The interpretation of registered property instruments in New Zealand: Property law and contract law perspectives. Verbal presentation at the Obligation Group Property Conference, Melbourne, Australia.

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Other - Edited Journal

Briggs, M., Connell, S., & France-Hudson, B. (Eds.). (2017). Otago Law Review, 15(1). [Journal Editors].

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Awarded Doctoral Degree

Connell, S. (2015). Implications of the modern approach to the interpretation of contracts (PhD). University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5911

More publications...