Introduction

The Anatomy of Humane Bodies, with Figures Drawn after the Life by Some of the Best Masters

The Anatomy of Humane Bodies, with Figures Drawn after the Life by Some of the Best Masters

Galen (130-201 AD), a notable physician to a number of Emperors in the first century AD, was a strong advocate of massage, even applying this treatment to the bodies of gladiators to ward off physical injuries. He thus has the distinction of being one of the first to develop Sports Massage. Integral to the use of massage as a preventive and restorative treatment is the role muscles play within the body. This is the first edition of William Cowper’s The Anatomy of Humane Bodies (1698), which contains some 114 superbly executed engravings of the human body. Here is an engraving by Michiel van der Gucht (1660-1725) of Henry Cooke’s drawing which depicts the back view of the entire musculature. The terminology used in the book would be familiar to almost every physiotherapist.


William Cowper, The Anatomy of Humane Bodies, with Figures Drawn after the Life by Some of the Best Masters, Oxford: Printed at the Theater, for Sam. Smith and Benj. Walford, London. 1698, Monro Collection M52.

The Anatomy of the Human Body

The Anatomy of the Human Body

Seneca, in his Epistulae Morales LVI, wrote of massage as being, ‘the systematic manipulation of the soft body tissues for therapeutic purposes: ‘I have lodgings right over a bathing establishment, he said, ‘So picture to yourself the assortment of sounds... I notice some lazy fellow, content with a cheap rub-down, and hear the crack of the pummelling hand on his shoulder, varying in sound according as the hand is laid on flat or hollow.’ So picture the masseur – precursor to the physiotherapist – working away on the triceps, deltoids, vastus internus (medialis, or teardrop muscle) or other muscles as depicted in William Cheselden’s classic Anatomy of the Human Body (1740). The rope securing the ankle and wrist is an interesting innovation.


William Cheselden, The Anatomy of the Human Body, London: Printed by William Bowyer. 1740, Monro Collection A6.

The Eternal Olympics: The Art and History of Sport

The Eternal Olympics: The Art and History of Sport

Hippocrates (c. 460-370 BC) was a great advocate of using massage for therapeutic healing and strongly advised his students to gain ‘hands-on’ experience. At the same time, athletics was developing in the ancient world and trainers and athletes came to realise the importance of massage in their training regimes. The iatraleiptes or ‘healer-anointer’ became an integral member of the ‘team’ behind successful athletes. Massage was used before training to warm up the muscles and afterwards to aid in muscle recovery. This scene, depicted on a Greek vase, was common in gymnasia all over ancient Greece.


Edited by Nicolaos Yalouris, The Eternal Olympics: The Art and History of Sport, New York: Caratzas Brothers. 1979, Storage GV23 EU2.

Origins of Physiotherapy

Massage and the Original Swedish Movements: Their Application to Various Diseases of the Body

Massage and the Original Swedish Movements: Their Application to Various Diseases of the Body

The exercises illustrated here are examples of Swedish movements (remedial exercises). Swedish movements were first devised by Pehr Henrik Ling (1776-1839), who worked at the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute in Stockholm. Ling is considered to be the founder of therapeutic or remedial exercise which forms the basis of physiotherapy today. Exercises to alleviate lateral curvature of the spine and explicit manipulation procedures are also featured throughout this book.


Kurre W. Ostrom, Massage and the Original Swedish Movements: Their Application to Various Diseases of the Body, Philadelphia: P. Blakiston’s Son & Co.. 1902, Historical Collection, Medical Library WB 537 O85 1902.

The Art of Massage: Its Physiological and Therapeutic Applications

The Art of Massage: Its Physiological and Therapeutic Applications

John Harvey Kellogg (1852-1943) was an American doctor who became famous for healthy breakfast cereals like cornflakes. Kellogg also promoted the combination of massage and systematic graduated Swedish exercises to alleviate ailments ranging from ‘diseases peculiar to women’ to the treatment of ‘chronic pain’. This plate shows four forms of vibratory equipment which were designed by Kellogg for the purposes of ‘vasomotor gymnastics.’ The pelvic tilting table (Fig 130.) was used to assist with pelvic congestion and rectal disease. According to Kellogg, ‘15 minutes per session’ was sufficient to secure a ‘physiological effect’ using this equipment.


John Harvey Kellogg, The Art of Massage: Its Physiological and Therapeutic Applications, Battle Creek, Michigan: Modern Medicine Publishing Co.. c. 1895, Historical Collection, Medical Library WB 537 K29 1895.

The Science and Art of Joint Manipulation

The Science and Art of Joint Manipulation

Dr James Beaver Mennell (1880-1957) is considered to be the father of modern manual therapy techniques. In his seminal work The Science and Art of Joint Manipulation, Mennell describes the mobilization techniques that form the foundation of modern manual therapeutic techniques used by many physiotherapists today. He clearly understood the synovial joint as a distinct anatomical entity, demonstrating that by using skilled purposeful passive movement with a gradient of force as a treatment intervention, it was possible to restore normal joint function.


James Beaver Mennell, The Science and Art of Joint Manipulation, London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd. 1952, Medical Storage WB 537 M547.

The Beginnings at Otago, 1913

In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013

In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013

Louise Shaw’s In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013 was published as part of the School of Physiotherapy’s centennial celebrations. Beginning with the story of the short-lived School of Massage at the University of Otago, the book traces the transformation of a modest training school at Dunedin Hospital into the internationally recognized New Zealand School of Physiotherapy. Following two decades as a department at the Otago Polytechnic the circle was completed in 1996 when the School of Physiotherapy was re-established at the University of Otago within the Division of Health Sciences. As New Zealand’s only training institution for physiotherapists until 1973, the book illustrates how education at Otago has played a central role in defining the physiotherapy profession.


Louise Shaw, In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013, Dunedin: University of Otago School of Physiotherapy. 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013

In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013

Louise Shaw’s In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013 was published as part of the School of Physiotherapy’s centennial celebrations. Beginning with the story of the short-lived School of Massage at the University of Otago, the book traces the transformation of a modest training school at Dunedin Hospital into the internationally recognized New Zealand School of Physiotherapy. Following two decades as a department at the Otago Polytechnic the circle was completed in 1996 when the School of Physiotherapy was re-established at the University of Otago within the Division of Health Sciences. As New Zealand’s only training institution for physiotherapists until 1973, the book illustrates how education at Otago has played a central role in defining the physiotherapy profession.


Louise Shaw, In Our Hands: 100 Years of Physiotherapy at Otago 1913-2013, Dunedin: University of Otago School of Physiotherapy. 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Commemorating 100 Years of Physiotherapy in New Zealand 1913-2013

Commemorating 100 Years of Physiotherapy in New Zealand 1913-2013

The Masseurs Registration Act came into operation in New Zealand on 1 January 1921. This meant that massage students were required to successfully complete a State examination in order to gain registration. The names of the first students from the School of Massage to be registered by the Masseurs’ Registration Board in 1921 are listed here.


The Physiotherapy Board of New Zealand, Commemorating 100 Years of Physiotherapy in New Zealand 1913-2013, [Dunedin]: The Physiotherapy Board of New Zealand. 3 April, 2013 , School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

First graduates of the University of Otago's School of Massage, 1914

First graduates of the University of Otago's School of Massage, 1914

The first students of the University of Otago’s School of Massage, who qualified from their 18 month course in 1914. From left: Elizabeth H. Washer, M. Frances Skevington, Edith J. Thomson, Ellen Smith, and Flora I. Gray.


School of Massage, University of Otago, First graduates of the University of Otago's School of Massage, 1914, ___. 1914, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Dunedin School of Massage: the First Ten Years of Physiotherapy Training in New Zealand

Dunedin School of Massage: the First Ten Years of Physiotherapy Training in New Zealand

Louise Mary Roberts (1886-1968), Sister-in charge of the School of Massage, was held in high regard by all her staff and students during her tenure as Head, 1925 to 1946. Louise trained at the Dunedin School of Massage in 1918-1919 and was the first graduate from the school to undertake additional teacher training at St Thomas’s Hospital, London. The new approaches learnt during her time at St Thomas’s Hospital were to have a profound influence on her teaching at the School of Massage when she returned to Dunedin in 1925.


Leah A. Taylor, Dunedin School of Massage: the First Ten Years of Physiotherapy Training in New Zealand, Dunedin: [The Author]. 1988, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Student Magazines, Newsletters & Examinations

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy

This 1960s Department of Health brochure is promoting the career of physiotherapy.


Department of Health, Physiotherapy, Physiotherapy, The Department: Wellington. 1964, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Physio. Magazine

Physio. Magazine

In the 1960s and early 1970s the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy Student’s Association produced an annual magazine consisting of contributions from students on a wide variety of subjects along with photographs of social events. These magazines remain an important keepsake for many physiotherapy students on their time at Otago.


New Zealand School of Physiotherapy Students’ Association, Physio. Magazine, New Zealand School of Physiotherapy Students’ Association. 1968, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Physio Mag

Physio Mag

In the 1960s and early 1970s the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy Student’s Association produced an annual magazine consisting of contributions from students on a wide variety of subjects along with photographs of social events. These magazines remain an important keepsake for many physiotherapy students on their time at Otago.


New Zealand School of Physiotherapy Students’ Association, Physio Mag, New Zealand School of Physiotherapy Students’ Association. 1969, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

PHTY Files

PHTY Files

The newsletter PHTY Files detailed key academic events and happenings at the School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. It was produced on a regular basis between February 1997 and 2006 and was edited by Judy Wilson, the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies at that time.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, PHTY Files, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. May 2001, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Maternity Exercise Examination

Maternity Exercise Examination

New Zealand School of Physiotherapy examination questions from the 1950s.


New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, Maternity Exercise Examination, New Zealand School of Physiotherapy. 1954, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Maternity Exercises Examination

Maternity Exercises Examination

New Zealand School of Physiotherapy examination questions from the 1950s.


New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, Maternity Exercises Examination, New Zealand School of Physiotherapy. 1955, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Enid Anderson & Electrotherapy

Certificate of Examination for Enid Mary Gotts

Certificate of Examination for Enid Mary Gotts

Enid Anderson (née Gotts) was not only a registered electrician but she was an expert in electro-therapy and introduced electro-myograph machines into the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy in the 1950s. She presented a scientific paper on the topic of examining the electrical activity in muscles and nerves to the 2nd Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapists in New York in June 1956. This is her Certificate of Registration as an electrician in New Zealand (1944).


Electrical Wiremen’s Registration Board of New Zealand, Certificate of Examination for Enid Mary Gotts, ___. September, 1944, Hocken MS-3852/451.

Enid Anderson and Colombo Plan students

Enid Anderson and Colombo Plan students

Enid Anderson was the principal of the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy from 1946 to 1965. She is shown here demonstrating electrotherapy - the application of short-wave diathermy (the generation of heat in tissue by electromagnetic current) - to a group of Colombo Plan students. The Colombo Plan was a government initiative set-up as a part of a wider regional economic and social development plan for emerging Asian countries. Between 1956 and 1963 nineteen students trained at the School of Physiotherapy under this scheme.


___, Enid Anderson and Colombo Plan students, ___. 1957, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Apparatus Used in Electrotherapy and Actinotherapy. Notes on Construction and Working

Apparatus Used in Electrotherapy and Actinotherapy. Notes on Construction and Working

Enid Anderson (née Gotts) authored the highly successful textbook Apparatus Used in Electrotherapy and Actinotherapy for physiotherapy students. Designed to engage students in active learning, this innovative work has blank pages available so that they could draw and label their own diagrams of the various electrical circuits, as illustrated here.


E. M. Gotts, Apparatus Used in Electrotherapy and Actinotherapy. Notes on Construction and Working, Dunedin: Robertson McBeath Ltd. 1950, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Women's Health

Safe Childbirth

Safe Childbirth

Childbirth education for women after the 1920s included recommendations for positions to be adopted for the different stages of labour when giving birth. Antenatal education arose from the realization that both psychological and physical preparation for the birth process was needed and that this should begin early on in pregnancy.


Kathleen Olga Vaughan, Safe Childbirth, London: Baillière, Tindall and Cox. 1937, Medical Storage WQ 100 V367.

Safe Childbirth

Safe Childbirth

Childbirth education for women after the 1920s included recommendations for positions to be adopted for the different stages of labour when giving birth. Antenatal education arose from the realization that both psychological and physical preparation for the birth process was needed and that this should begin early on in pregnancy.


Kathleen Olga Vaughan, Safe Childbirth, London: Baillière, Tindall and Cox. 1937, Medical Storage WQ 100 V367.

Training for Childbirth: From the Mother’s Point of View

Training for Childbirth: From the Mother’s Point of View

Antenatal education for pregnant women emerged from the vision of health care workers who were concerned about high maternal and infant mortality rates in the early 1900s. At the time Minnie Randell’s Training for Childbirth was published in 1941, there was also an interest in promoting a ‘fitter population’ in Britain. Minnie Randell was Principal at the School of Massage at St Thomas’s Hospital, London, and an important influence for physiotherapists regarding antenatal and postnatal education.


Minnie Randell, Training for Childbirth: From the Mother’s Point of View, London: J. & A. Churchill. 1941, Medical Storage WQ 150 RC60 1943.

The Body Beautiful

The Body Beautiful

The ergonomics of women’s work. This photograph depicts the concept of incorrect posture while sewing. One possible explanation for the lack of clothing in this photograph is that the curvature of the spine in this posture is made more highly visible.


Alice Bloch, The Body Beautiful, London: John Lane The Bodley Head. 1934, Medical Storage QT 255 B651.

The Body Beautiful

The Body Beautiful

The ergonomics of women’s work. These photographs depict the concept of correct posture in working situations, in this case writing and sewing. One possible explanation for the lack of clothing in these photographs is that the curvature of the spine in these different postures is made more highly visible.


Alice Bloch, The Body Beautiful, London: John Lane The Bodley Head. 1934, Medical Storage QT 255 B651.

Vaginal Cones

Vaginal Cones

Here is a set of brass vaginal cones used for progressive weight training of the pelvic floor musculature designed to treat the problem of female urinary stress incontinence. Research has shown that the use of these vaginal cones is not as effective as standard pelvic floor exercises for this disorder and, consequently, are no longer used (Bo, 1999).


___, Vaginal Cones, ___. ___, Courtesy of Gail Hyland, Physiotherapist and School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Medical Electricity

Bircher Corporation, No 627 Spot-Quartz U.V (Wood's) Filter; Joanco Medical Electronics, Point Finder and Stimulator. Model No.4; Hanovia, Light No.504/4

Bircher Corporation, No 627 Spot-Quartz U.V (Wood's) Filter; Joanco Medical Electronics, Point Finder and Stimulator. Model No.4; Hanovia, Light No.504/4

This spectrometer (far right) has a special glass filter (Wood’s filter) which permits the transmission of ultra-violet light rays and cuts out visible and infra-red rays. The spectrometer was likely to have been used in the calibration of ultra-violet machines to ensure the adequate transmission of ultra-violet rays. The red battery-operated point finder (middle) was used to detect the levels of skin resistance. It was used by physiotherapists to locate acupuncture points or alternatively, to determine the optimal location of points to electrically stimulate muscles or nerves. The high-pressure mercury vapour bulb (far left) encases two thorium-coated electrodes at each end. It was designed to fit into a parabolic shaped Hanovia ultra-violet lamp. The mercury vapour produces short ultra-violet light rays which were used therapeutically for irradiating superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes.


___, Bircher Corporation, No 627 Spot-Quartz U.V (Wood's) Filter; Joanco Medical Electronics, Point Finder and Stimulator. Model No.4; Hanovia, Light No.504/4, ___. ___, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

World War One serviceman receiving treatment

World War One serviceman receiving treatment

This photograph depicts a returned serviceman from World War One receiving electrical stimulation of the thigh muscles with a Faradic battery and button electrode. Faradic stimulation of muscles was carried out to prevent wasting and disuse in the presence of nerve injuries and fractures.


Otago Witness, World War One serviceman receiving treatment, Otago Witness. 4 June, 1919, Image S13-018b Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago.

World War One serviceman receiving treatment

World War One serviceman receiving treatment

This photograph is entitled ‘The treatment of stiff joints by dry radiant heat’ and is one of a series that featured in the Otago Witness after World War One (1914-18). A notable feature in all of the photographs, which were taken at Dunedin Hospital, is the standard practice of the returned servicemen wearing their uniforms while receiving treatment.


Otago Witness, World War One serviceman receiving treatment, Otago Witness. 4 June, 1919, Image S13-566d Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago.

Gillian 'Gilly' Hall - Advocate for Disabled Skiing

GILLIAN (GILLY) HALL (née Macdonald) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1971

GILLIAN (GILLY) HALL (née Macdonald) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1971

Gilly Hall, the great grand-daughter of Sir Henry Lindo Ferguson, a former Dean of the Otago Medical School, was a prominent advocate of skiing for the disabled both nationally and internationally. Having been exposed to the concept of disabled skiing in Switzerland, Gilly returned to New Zealand with the hope of making skiing for the disabled a reality in this country. Gilly’s dual role of physiotherapist and ski-instructor made her a highly appropriate ambassador for the cause - she fully understood the impact of uneven snow slopes, excessive curves, and the challenges of various physical disabilities. Gilly was instrumental in setting up the NZ Association of Disabled Skiing in 1976. She took on the role of team physiotherapist for the Paralympic Games on four occasions and was awarded the inaugural New Zealand Ski Association’s Skier of Year Award (1978), and the Queen’s Service Medal for her services to the sport and the disabled (1986). On her untimely death in 2009 Gilly received both national and international tributes for her contribution to disabled skiing.


___, GILLIAN (GILLY) HALL (née Macdonald) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1971, ___. 2006, Photograph courtesy of the Hall family..

Adam Hall, Vancouver 2010

Adam Hall, Vancouver 2010

Adam Hall is a paralympic skier. Gilly Hall (no relation) mentored Adam during her time on the National Paralympics Committee of New Zealand. Adam has been a member of the New Zealand Disabled Ski Team since 2005, representing New Zealand in Torino, Italy in 2006 and Vancouver, Canada in 2010.


___, Adam Hall, Vancouver 2010, ___. 2010, Photograph courtesy of Andrew Duff.

Andrew Duff and Adam Hall, Paralympic Games, Vancouver

Andrew Duff and Adam Hall, Paralympic Games, Vancouver

Physiotherapist Andrew Duff is pictured here with disabled skier Adam Hall at the Paralympic Games, Vancouver, 2010. Andrew Duff graduated from the School of Physiotherapy in 2004, and has since worked as a Physiotherapist for the New Zealand Youth Olympics, Winter Olympics and the New Zealand Paralympic Team of the World Championships.


___, Andrew Duff and Adam Hall, Paralympic Games, Vancouver, ___. 2010, Photograph courtesy of Andrew Duff.

Skiing

Skiing

Thanks to the pioneering efforts of physiotherapist Gilly Hall, disabled children of all ages and abilities enjoy the challenges and delights of skiing in New Zealand.


Disabled Skiing New Zealand, Skiing, Disabled Skiing New Zealand. 2013, Photograph courtesy of Disabled Skiing New Zealand 2013.

Alpine Skiing Classification Rules and Regulations

Alpine Skiing Classification Rules and Regulations

These are the 2013 International Paralympic Committee’s (IPC) classification system rules and regulations for disabled skiers. The IPC classification process is unique to each sport and is designed to ensure fair play between disabled athletes. For this to happen, each skier is categorized according to his or her disability. Gilly Hall played a lead role in the IPC’s Alpine Skiing Sport Technical Committee, an agency responsible for establishing and reviewing the physical criteria for the different levels of the IPC classification system.


International Paralympic Committee, Alpine Skiing Classification Rules and Regulations, Germany: International Paralympic Committee. July 2013, http://www.paralympic.org/AlpineSkiing/RulesandRegulations/Classification.

Helen Littleworth - Sports Physiotherapist

HELEN LITTLEWORTH - Graduate Otago School of Physiotherapy - class of 1993; XXX Olympiad Accreditation Pass for Helen Littleworth

HELEN LITTLEWORTH - Graduate Otago School of Physiotherapy - class of 1993; XXX Olympiad Accreditation Pass for Helen Littleworth

Helen has had a long held interest in sport since her schoolgirl days at Wairarapa College. Her sporting career has spanned some twenty years, first representing New Zealand in hockey between 1986 and 1988, and then representing New Zealand in rugby, playing fourteen test matches for the Black Ferns from 1990 to 1996. In 1991 Helen captained the Black Ferns team on the hallowed ground of Cardiff Arms Park, Wales. Her contribution to women’s rugby culminated in her being awarded the University of Otago’s ‘Sportsperson of the Year’ in October 1995. She then took on a new role as rugby coach for the Otago Women’s Rugby team after gaining a coaching Diploma at Massey University. Not long after, she graduated with a Master’s degree in Manipulative Therapy from the School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. Since then Helen’s career as a sports physiotherapist has flourished. She was appointed as the physiotherapist for the New Zealand Women’s Rugby World Cup in 1997 and was a team physiotherapist for the Commonwealth Games in 2006 and 2010. Helen was also a member of physiotherapy/medical support team attending the Beijing Olympics in 2008 and the London Olympics in 2012.


International Olympic Committee, HELEN LITTLEWORTH - Graduate Otago School of Physiotherapy - class of 1993; XXX Olympiad Accreditation Pass for Helen Littleworth, ___. August, 2012, Private Collection.

Participation Medal for Helen Littleworth, XXX Olympiad

Participation Medal for Helen Littleworth, XXX Olympiad

The participation medal awarded to members of the official New Zealand medical/physiotherapy support team at the 2012 Olympic Games in London.


International Olympic Committee, Participation Medal for Helen Littleworth, XXX Olympiad, ___. 2012, Private Collection.

Raylene Bates, Helen Littleworth, and Yvette Latta

Raylene Bates, Helen Littleworth, and Yvette Latta

Sports physiotherapist Helen Littleworth is flanked by her colleagues Raylene Bates (left) and Yvette Latta (right). This picture was taken in Dunedin prior to their departure to the London 2012 Olympic Games.


Otago Daily Times, Raylene Bates, Helen Littleworth, and Yvette Latta, Otago Daily Times. 7 June, 2012, Photograph courtesy of Otago Daily Times.

Helen Littleworth

Helen Littleworth

Helen Littleworth, sports physiotherapist, treating a patient in her Dunedin physiotherapy practice.


___, Helen Littleworth, ___. July 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Helen Littleworth and Raylene Bates

Helen Littleworth and Raylene Bates

Helen Littleworth was appointed as a physiotherapist for the Commonwealth Games held in Delhi in 2010. This photograph was taken of Helen and her colleague Raylene Bates just prior to their departure to the Games.


Otago Daily Times, Helen Littleworth and Raylene Bates, Otago Daily Times. 22 September, 2010, Photograph courtesy of Otago Daily Times.

Delhi 2010 XIX Commonwealth Games Certificate of Participation

Delhi 2010 XIX Commonwealth Games Certificate of Participation

Certificate of Participation from the 2010 Delhi Commonwealth Games awarded to Helen Littleworth


Commonwealth Games Federation, Delhi 2010 XIX Commonwealth Games Certificate of Participation, ___. October 2010, Private Collection.

Hopin Lee - Sports Concussion & Injury Prevention Research

Exploring the provocation of postconcussion-like symptoms in response to a standardised exercise protocol incorporating a cognitive task

Exploring the provocation of postconcussion-like symptoms in response to a standardised exercise protocol incorporating a cognitive task

Hopin Lee’s Master of Physiotherapy thesis submitted for publication in 2012.


Hopin Lee, Exploring the provocation of postconcussion-like symptoms in response to a standardised exercise protocol incorporating a cognitive task, Master of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Dunedin. 2012, Storage Theses W 4 L478 2012.

Exploring the provocation of postconcussion-like symptoms in response to a standardised exercise protocol incorporating a cognitive task

Exploring the provocation of postconcussion-like symptoms in response to a standardised exercise protocol incorporating a cognitive task

Hopin Lee’s Master of Physiotherapy thesis submitted for publication in 2012.


Hopin Lee, Exploring the provocation of postconcussion-like symptoms in response to a standardised exercise protocol incorporating a cognitive task, Master of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Dunedin. 2012, Storage Theses W4 L478 2012.

Hopin Lee and his family

Hopin Lee and his family

Here is Hopin (third from left) in his graduation attire with his parents, Kunyong [Bruce] and Sunae, and his sister, Hoyoun, at the University of Otago.


___, Hopin Lee and his family, ___. 2012, Courtesy of Hopin Lee.

HOPIN LEE - Graduate School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago - class of 2010

HOPIN LEE - Graduate School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago - class of 2010

When Hopin and his family emigrated to New Zealand in 1996 he could not speak English. He set about the task of integrating into his new primary school in Auckland. Fourteen years later, in 2010, Hopin graduated from the School of Physiotherapy with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy (with distinction) - testament to successfully overcoming the initial challenges of immersing himself into New Zealand life. With an interest in sports physiotherapy, he elected to go directly into a research pathway by enrolling in the Master of Physiotherapy degree, a first in the history of the School’s programme. He graduated with a Master of Physiotherapy (with distinction) in 2012. Armed with a number of academic awards and several publications in peer-reviewed international journals arising from his time at Otago, Hopin has set his sights firmly on a research career. He was recently granted an Australian Postgraduate Award which has enabled him to undertake doctoral studies under the supervision of prestigious Australian physiotherapy researcher, Professor Lorimer Moseley. Taking advantage of his opportunities, particularly in the research field, Hopin has become a great role model for other graduates of the School. This photograph shows Professor John Sullivan, supervisor for Hopin’s Master of Physiotherapy thesis, and Hopin Lee (Senior Lecturer Dr Tony Schneiders was also a supervisor for this work).


___, HOPIN LEE - Graduate School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago - class of 2010, ___. 2012, Photograph courtesy of Hopin Lee.

The Use of the Dual-task Paradigm in Detecting Gait Performance Deficits following a Sports-related Concussion in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, volume 16

The Use of the Dual-task Paradigm in Detecting Gait Performance Deficits following a Sports-related Concussion in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, volume 16

This is a journal article written by Hopin Lee and his supervisors about the quality of gait following sports concussion. It was published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport online (2013).


Hopin Lee, S. John Sullivan, and Anthony Schneiders, The Use of the Dual-task Paradigm in Detecting Gait Performance Deficits following a Sports-related Concussion in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, volume 16, Elsevier. 2013, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1440244012000655 .

Norigae - traditional Korean pendant trinket

Norigae - traditional Korean pendant trinket

Hopin Lee is fluent in both English and Korean and along with his family, is proud of his Korean heritage. This traditional Korean pendant trinket is called a Norigae (노리개) and belongs to Hopin’s mother, Sunae Lee. The Norigae is worn by women around the chest and waistline together with the Han Bok (한복) is often worn at special events and occasions such as weddings and funerals.


___, Norigae - traditional Korean pendant trinket, ___. ___, Courtesy of the Lee family, 2013 .

Bernice 'Bunny' Thompson & China

Go Anywhere Do Anything. New Zealanders in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China 1945-1951

Go Anywhere Do Anything. New Zealanders in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China 1945-1951

This photograph shows Bunny (second from right) and her husband Heath Thompson (right) in Wellington in January 1946, just prior to their departure as part of the Friends Ambulance Unit. The group travelled to China via Calcutta.


Caitriona Cameron, Go Anywhere Do Anything. New Zealanders in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China 1945-1951, Wellington: The Beechtree Press. 1996, Hocken BX 7726.5 Q13 No.4.

BERNICE (BUNNY) THOMPSON (née Alldred) - Graduate Dunedin School of Massage - class of 1943. Imagefrom Go Anywhere Do Anything. New Zealanders in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China 1945-1951

BERNICE (BUNNY) THOMPSON (née Alldred) - Graduate Dunedin School of Massage - class of 1943. Imagefrom Go Anywhere Do Anything. New Zealanders in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China 1945-1951

Bunny is renowned as a pioneer and advocate for respiratory self-management and patient education. It is her work in China, however, that involved the setting up of a small physiotherapy school which is less well-known. Bunny and her husband went to China to work for the British Religious Society of Friends’ (Quakers) Ambulance Unit (FAU) in 1945. The hospital set-up at Guang Sheng Hospital, Changde, where they were based, was to prove vastly different from New Zealand. In 1947 the Thompsons moved to the Institute of Hospital Technology in Hankou (now Wuhan) where Bunny set up a physiotherapy training course - purportedly one of the first Western-style physiotherapy schools in China. Bunny pleaded for electrotherapy equipment to be sent from New Zealand and improvised where necessary. Her physiotherapy programme commenced in April 1947 with six students. Bunny did all of the physiotherapy teaching, and she had the intense satisfaction of passing on her physiotherapy knowledge to her Chinese students (Cameron, 1996). The Thompsons left China for the United Kingdom in 1948.


Caitriona Cameron, BERNICE (BUNNY) THOMPSON (née Alldred) - Graduate Dunedin School of Massage - class of 1943. Imagefrom Go Anywhere Do Anything. New Zealanders in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China 1945-1951, Wellington: The Beechtree Press. 1996, Hocken BX 7726.5 Q13 No.4.

Bunny Thompson and physiotherapy student

Bunny Thompson and physiotherapy student

Bunny Thompson and a physiotherapy student from the Institute of Hospital Technology, Hankou (Wuhan), China, with a young patient (1947).


___, Bunny Thompson and physiotherapy student, ___. 1947, Photograph from Lindsay Crozier Thompson Collection. Courtesy of Caitriona Cameron.

Bunny Thompson

Bunny Thompson

Bunny Thompson demonstrating the use of the Faradic battery to her six Chinese physiotherapy students at the Institute of Hospital Technology, Hankou (Wuhan), China, in 1947.


___, Bunny Thompson, ___. 1947, Photograph from Lindsay Crozier Thompson Collection. Courtesy of Caitriona Cameron .

Bunny Thompson

Bunny Thompson

Bunny Thompson, her Chinese physiotherapy students and two young patients at the Institute of Hospital Technology, Hankou (Wuhan), China, where she had set up a small Western-style physiotherapy course.


___, Bunny Thompson, ___. 1947, Photograph from Lindsay Crozier Thompson Collection. Courtesy of Caitriona Cameron.

Staff at the Institute of Technology Hankou, China, 1947

Staff at the Institute of Technology Hankou, China, 1947

Bunny Thompson photographed with staff at the Institute of Technology Hankou, China, in 1947. From rear left: Arthur Wallbank, Jack Chen, Alf Sidwell, (all Medical Mechanics School), Mrs Cha (interpreter), Luke Chang (Laboratory Technician School), Roy Lucas (Business Manager), and Bunny Thompson (Physiotherapy School)


___, Staff at the Institute of Technology Hankou, China, 1947, ___. 1947, Photograph from Lindsay Crozier Thompson Collection. Courtesy of Caitriona Cameron..

Anne Mcauley - Volunteer Physiotherapist

ANNE McAULEY (née Apperly) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1956

ANNE McAULEY (née Apperly) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1956

As a mother of three young children in the early 1970s Anne McAuley became involved in volunteer work as a means of keeping up her physiotherapy skills rather than trying to fit in with more rigid hours offered by employers. Anne volunteered her time with the Riding for the Disabled (1968-75) before becoming heavily involved with the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society. She put her physiotherapy knowledge to good use in her roles as Otago Branch President, delegate and National Vice-President (1974-87), and then National President (1987-91) of the MS Society. Persons with multiple sclerosis (P.W.M.S) sought improved levels of information and Anne co-authored the first of several pamphlets on pain and spasticity to be produced by the Society. Her experience with the Riding for Disabled provided her with insight into the potential for P.W.M.S to become involved in sport, and she promoted both riding and swimming as suitable sporting options. Anne also found time to become the President of the Otago-Southland Branch of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists. A feature of Anne’s leadership in all of these volunteering roles was the need for the physiotherapy profession to link with the wider community of disabled people, both young and old.


___, ANNE McAULEY (née Apperly) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1956, ___. ___, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Access Dunedin. Dunedin for the Disabled

Access Dunedin. Dunedin for the Disabled

Access Dunedin documents a comprehensive overview for the disabled of the buildings and their levels of physical accessibility throughout the Dunedin area. The book was to prove important in recognition of the need to include provision for the physically disabled in the design of public buildings in the Dunedin locality. The book was co-authored by Anne McAuley and Gwenyth Billinghurst (née Cassie), a physiotherapy colleague.


Gwenyth Billinghurst and Anne McAuley (compilers), Access Dunedin. Dunedin for the Disabled, [Dunedin]. [c.1980] , Hocken QBL1 Bil.

Anne McAuley, Billie McLeod and Mrs June Greig

Anne McAuley, Billie McLeod and Mrs June Greig

Anne McAuley, physiotherapist and President of the Otago Branch of the Multiple Sclerosis Society, discusses the book, A Manual on Multiple Sclerosis, with Billie McLeod (Principal of the School of Physiotherapy) and Mrs June Greig, the School’s librarian.


Otago Daily Times, Anne McAuley, Billie McLeod and Mrs June Greig, Otago Daily Times. 24 October, 1978, Courtesy of Otago Daily Times.

Anne McAuley and David Wright on horse, Tralee

Anne McAuley and David Wright on horse, Tralee

In November 1974, Anne McAuley was the newly appointed president of the Otago-Southland Branch of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists. One area of particular interest for her was the therapy gained by patients in horse riding. Here she assists David Wright on his horse Tralee.


Otago Daily Times, Anne McAuley and David Wright on horse, Tralee, Otago Daily Times. 15 November, 1974, Courtesy of Otago Daily Times.

Anne and Morven McAuley, and Mary Smart

Anne and Morven McAuley, and Mary Smart

It is now standard to have ramps and easy access into buildings. In the past, this was not so. In 1976, Anne McAuley was the co-ordinator of ‘Access Week’, an awareness raising event organized by the Otago Branch of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists. This photograph depicts Mrs Mary Smart (right) of Mosgiel trying out the ramp for the newly built Maori Hill Post Office under the watchful eye of Anne McAuley (left). In this instance Mary found the door access impossible to open. Anne’s daughter Morven (aged 3) is seen in the background.


Otago Daily Times, Anne and Morven McAuley, and Mary Smart, Otago Daily Times. 16 September, 1976, Photograph courtesy of Otago Daily Times.

Multiple Sclerosis...Spasticity and MS

Multiple Sclerosis...Spasticity and MS

This educational booklet about multiple sclerosis and spasticity was authored by Anne McAuley in response to the need for information for people with multiple sclerosis about some of the common symptoms associated with this condition and their management. The booklet was written in a factual style and was one of an education series which was produced by the MS Society of New Zealand.


Anne McAuley, Multiple Sclerosis...Spasticity and MS, Wellington: Multiple Sclerosis Society of New Zealand. 1994, Medical Pamphlets no. 1927.

Leonard 'Len' Ring - Physiotherapist & Ergonomist

LEONARD (LEN) RING - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1954

LEONARD (LEN) RING - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1954

Prior to undertaking his training at the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, Len Ring served in the British Army. After graduating in 1954, Len ran a physiotherapy practice in Mt Eden, Auckland, and went on to found and lead the NZ Physiotherapists Private Practitioner’s Association in its early years. In 1972 he was the recipient of a QEII Scholarship which enabled him to gain a MA in Ergonomics at the University of Loughborough, England. On his return to New Zealand, he became a Lecturer in Ergonomics at the School of Architecture, University of Auckland and Lecturer in Industrial Handling for the National Safety Council of New Zealand. Len had a strong conviction of the need for sound biomechanical principles. By the 1980s the name ‘Len Ring’ was synonymous with television advertisements and films promoting ‘bending the knees’ and ‘keeping the spine straight during lifting.’ In 1993, in recognition of his work in America, he was inducted into the Safety and Health Hall of Fame International at the National Safety Congress in Chicago. Len was the public face for ergonomic spinal care, educating and informing a whole generation of physiotherapists, manual workers and employers on industrial handling, injury prevention and care of the spine. In 1972, he targeted the trade unions in New Zealand, urging them to take a more active role in ergonomics and safer and better working conditions. Here he is in Dunedin addressing waterside workers about safe work practice and the need to protect the spine.


Evening Star, Dunedin, LEONARD (LEN) RING - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1954, Evening Star, Dunedin. 7 July 1972, Supplied by the Otago Daily Times.

Part 1 Physical Materials Handling and the Back Injury; Part 2 Ergonomics in Materials Handling and Accident Prevention

Part 1 Physical Materials Handling and the Back Injury; Part 2 Ergonomics in Materials Handling and Accident Prevention

Len Ring was a consultant to some of New Zealand’s largest companies and became established on the international safety conference circuit in Britain, America, Australia and South Africa. The course outline on Physical Material Handling and Back Injury was typical of the prevention courses he conducted throughout the country in the 1980s.


Leonard Ring, Part 1 Physical Materials Handling and the Back Injury; Part 2 Ergonomics in Materials Handling and Accident Prevention, Auckland: The Institute of Materials Handling. 1982, Hocken: Hoc HI1 .

Facts on Backs

Facts on Backs

The motivation for this work was to educate readers on the prevention of back injuries in the workplace and how to best manage back pain from an ergonomic perspective.


Leonard Ring, Facts on Backs, Loganville, Georgia: Institute Press. 1981, Medical Storage WE 720 RN95.

Backs. A Common Sense Approach to back Injury Prevention

Backs. A Common Sense Approach to back Injury Prevention

The motivation for this work was to educate readers on the prevention of back injuries in the workplace and how to best manage back pain from an ergonomic perspective.


Leonard Ring, Backs. A Common Sense Approach to back Injury Prevention, [Auckland: The Author]. 1993, Medical Storage WE720 R581 1993.

The Legacy of Polio

The Treatment of Infantile Paralysis

The Treatment of Infantile Paralysis

Polio (more correctly Poliomyelitis) is a viral disease which may affect the spinal cord causing muscle weakness and paralysis. It was common in infants and young children, especially under conditions of poor hygiene. New Zealand experienced epidemics of polio in 1916, 1925, 1927, 1937, 1948–49, 1952–53 and 1955–56. Polio victims were treated with radiant heat in the early stages to deal with the pain before progressing to re-education of paralyzed muscles and hydrotherapy as the general condition allowed. Splints were also applied where necessary to prevent over-stretching of paralyzed muscles. Today the disease has been eliminated in all but three countries around the world. The deformities, secondary to muscle paralysis seen in patients with polio, were often extreme. Textbooks, such as Robert W. Lovett's The Treatment of Infantile Paralysis, were dedicated to the therapeutic management of these problems.


Robert W. Lovett, The Treatment of Infantile Paralysis, Philadelphia: P. Blakiston’s Son & Co.. 1917, Truby King Collection WC555 LW55 1917.

Double iron calliper boots

Double iron calliper boots

The pair of child’s boots with iron callipers (or calipers; US) on display are typical of those used to prevent contractures of the lower limb muscles following lower limb paralysis secondary due to polio. The wearing of these boots must have had some psychological effect on children suffering from polio. The sheer weight of these boots must also have had some physical impact on these children.


___, Double iron calliper boots, ___. Circa 1940, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Boy receiving infra-red (heat) therapy

Boy receiving infra-red (heat) therapy

Photograph of a boy receiving infra-red (heat) therapy to the lower limb.


___, Boy receiving infra-red (heat) therapy, ___. ___, Photograph courtesy of Frank Weedon Collection, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Children's Room in the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, Dunedin

Children's Room in the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, Dunedin

Children who suffered varying degrees of disability due to polio often underwent treatment at the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy. The small girl in the standing walking frame in this photograph is Beverly Hopkins (née Jones). Beverly contracted polio at the age of 8 years which resulted in permanent paralysis of her left leg. Following her discharge from hospital, Beverly went to a convalescent home in the Dunedin suburb of Kew for several months. Her orthopedic surgeon at the time, Mr Waldron Fitzgerald, assured Beverly’s mother that she was ‘tough and would pull through’. Beverly is now into her seventies, proving the prediction true. She still suffers from the residual effects of polio.


Otago Daily Times, Children's Room in the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, Dunedin, Otago Daily Times. 9 October, 1957, Photograph courtesy of Otago Daily Times .

The Growing Body: Its Nature, Needs and Training

The Growing Body: Its Nature, Needs and Training

James Renfrew White (1888-1961) was an orthopedic surgeon at Dunedin Public hospital (1920-1948) and was a strong advocate for physiotherapy. He was well aware of the sinister effects of infection on children in New Zealand. In his book, The Growing Body, he wrote about the need for children suffering from a range of infectious diseases including poliomyelitis ‘to be excluded from school for at least 6 weeks if treated at home until disinfection of the house had been carried out’ and ‘until a certificate of clearance had been received from an inspector.’


J. Renfrew White, The Growing Body: Its Nature, Needs and Training, Dunedin: Coulls Somerville Wilkie Ltd. Printers. 1931, Truby King Collection WS103 WK376.

Gay Wood - Cardiac Physiotherapist

GAY WOOD (née Jameson) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1963

GAY WOOD (née Jameson) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1963

Gay Wood became involved in cardiac rehabilitation in her capacity as a young physiotherapy lecturer at the New Zealand School of Physiotherapy. She worked alongside Ted Nye, Medical School Senior Lecturer, who was instrumental in developing the cardiac programme in Dunedin. As a means of increasing their physical capacity, Gay supervised the first patients with coronary heart disease to undertake structured exercise classes in a community setting (under the umbrella name of the Coronary Club). The exercises were initially limited to land-based exercises in the Hanover Street Physiotherapy Gymnasium. Before long, hydrotherapy was added to the programme and patients enjoyed modified water polo in the Physiotherapy Pool. The Dunedin Phoenix Club was established in 1967 as way of ensuring community-led exercises for patients with varying degrees of coronary heart disease, who could then have access to appropriate gymnasium and hydrotherapy facilities under the supervision of physiotherapists. Otago-based physiotherapists continue to take on a supervisory role in their on-going support for the Phoenix Club, which has extended its activities to tramping and encouraging greater family involvement.


___, GAY WOOD (née Jameson) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1963, ___. 2013, Courtesy Gay Wood.

Exercise and the Coronary Patient

Exercise and the Coronary Patient

Ischaemic heart disease (also known as coronary heart disease) includes angina and heart attacks (myocardial infarction). The exercises recommended for individuals with this problem target the large muscle groups of the body. They are usually carried out in well supported positions such as sitting or lying.


E. R. Nye and P. Gay Wood, Exercise and the Coronary Patient, London: Wolfe Publishing Ltd. 1971, Medical WG 300 N994.

Phoenix Club members playing water polo

Phoenix Club members playing water polo

Modified water polo was introduced as a means of sustaining patient interest while undertaking exercise without too much physical exertion. This photograph was taken of the Dunedin Phoenix Club members enjoying a game of water polo in the Physiotherapy Pool in Hanover Street, Dunedin.


___, Phoenix Club members playing water polo, ___. c. 1968, Photograph: S13-566c Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago.

Phoenix Club members doing cardiac exercises

Phoenix Club members doing cardiac exercises

Double straight leg-raising was one of the cardiac exercises performed by members at the Dunedin Phoenix Club, which was located in the gymnasium at the Physiotherapy Outpatients Department, Hanover Street, Dunedin.


___, Phoenix Club members doing cardiac exercises, ___. c. 1968, Photograph S13-566a Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago.

Phoenix Club members enjoying a game of table tennis

Phoenix Club members enjoying a game of table tennis

Members of the Phoenix Club enjoying a sociable game of table tennis in the gymnasium at the Physiotherapy Outpatients Department, Hanover Street, Dunedin.


___, Phoenix Club members enjoying a game of table tennis, ___. c. 1968, Photograph: S13-566d Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago.

Julie Hamilton & Communicating Rehabilitation Messages

JULIE HAMILTON (née Christie) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1961

JULIE HAMILTON (née Christie) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1961

Much of Julie Hamilton’s physiotherapy career has involved rehabilitation in the global health community. As a consequence of her long standing interest in leprosy, she has worked in Papua New Guinea (PNG) for 20 years, during the 1960s to 1980s. Her first appointment in PNG was at Modilon Hospital, Madang. She then spent a further 14 years in Rabaul, East New Britain. Throughout her time in PNG she became increasingly aware of the important role that families and communities play in physical rehabilitation, and the possibility of using the written word with illustrations to communicate health messages. This communication was especially challenging because of the cultural diversity of PNG and the many different languages and dialects spoken there. Following further postgraduate education Julie wrote a series of books which were designed to develop awareness of disability. The people she worked with in PNG and those she came to know inspired the creation of these works. In more recent times, together with her surgeon husband, Julie has participated in short-term work in Timor Leste and in PNG, where former colleagues continue to contribute to her story writing.


___, JULIE HAMILTON (née Christie) - Graduate New Zealand School of Physiotherapy - class of 1961, ___. 2013, Courtesy of Julie Hamilton.

Please Hold My Hand

Please Hold My Hand

This is one book from a selection of by Julie Hamilton that spreads the word by telling stories about the serious health issues such as leprosy and the Aids virus that confront the children of Papua New Guinea today, and the hope of rehabilitation. Julie often writes in collaboration with her PNG colleagues to ensure that the traditional ways of dealing with disability are respected.


Julie Hamilton [and others], Please Hold My Hand, Alice Springs, Australia: The Author. 2007, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Pimo and the Golden Mango

Pimo and the Golden Mango

This is one book from a selection by Julie Hamilton that spreads the word by telling stories about the serious health issues such as leprosy and the Aids virus that confront the children of Papua New Guinea today, and the hope of rehabilitation. Julie often writes in collaboration with her PNG colleagues to ensure that the traditional ways of dealing with disability are respected.


Julie Hamilton, Pimo and the Golden Mango, Box Hill, Victoria, Australia: The Leprosy Mission Australia. 2000, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Iamavoko and Tokinakava

Iamavoko and Tokinakava

This is one book from a selection by Julie Hamilton that spreads the word by telling stories about serious health issues such as leprosy and the Aids virus that confront the children of Papua New Guinea today, and the hope of rehabilitation. Julie often writes in collaboration with her PNG colleagues to ensure that the traditional ways of dealing with disability are respected.


Julie Hamilton, Iamavoko and Tokinakava, Alice Springs, Northern Territory: The Author. 1996, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Mumbuari Dance!

Mumbuari Dance!

This is one book from a selection by Julie Hamilton that spreads the word by telling stories about the serious health issues such as leprosy and the Aids virus that confront the children of Papua New Guinea today, and the hope of rehabilitation. Julie often writes in collaboration with her PNG colleagues to ensure that the traditional ways of dealing with disability are respected.


Julie Hamilton [and others], Mumbuari Dance!, Alice Springs, Northern Territory: The Author. 2004, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

All I Could See Was Darkness

All I Could See Was Darkness

This is one book from a selection by Julie Hamilton that spreads the word by telling stories about the serious health issues such as leprosy and the Aids virus that confront the children of Papua New Guinea today, and the hope of rehabilitation. Julie often writes in collaboration with her PNG colleagues to ensure that the traditional ways of dealing with disability are respected.


Julie Hamilton [and others], All I Could See Was Darkness, Alice Springs, Northern Territory: The Autho. 2005, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

George's Story

George's Story

This is one book from a selection by Julie Hamilton that spreads the word by telling stories about the serious health issues such as leprosy and the Aids virus that confront the children of Papua New Guinea today, and the hope of rehabilitation. Julie often writes in collaboration with her PNG colleagues to ensure that the traditional ways of dealing with disability are respected.


Julie Hamilton, George's Story, Alice Springs, Northern Territory: The Author. 1997, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Rot Bilong Halivim Pikinini I Gat Serebrol Polsi

Rot Bilong Halivim Pikinini I Gat Serebrol Polsi

Rot Bilong Halivim Pikinini I Gat Serebrol Polsi is written in a combination of English and Pidgin English. It is intended as a graphic educational tool for health care workers and the wider family about the management of cerebral palsy. The cover and images contained in this book not only illustrate traditional Papua New Guinea beliefs regarding disability but also show ways in which disabled children can be helped.


Julie Hamilton, Rot Bilong Halivim Pikinini I Gat Serebrol Polsi, [Australia]: Rotary International. 2009, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Cerebral Palsy Clinic

Cerebral Palsy Clinic

This is the Cerebral Palsy Clinic, Rabaul, East New Britain, where Julie Hamilton worked as a physiotherapist. Between 1983 and 1990, there were almost two hundred children registered in the East New Britain region with cerebral palsy. Many of them travelled vast distances to receive treatment.


Julie Hamilton, Cerebral Palsy Clinic, ___. ___, Courtesy Julie Hamilton.

A traditional warrior, Papua New Guinea

A traditional warrior, Papua New Guinea

A traditional warrior from Papua New Guinea


___, A traditional warrior, Papua New Guinea, ___. ___, Private Collection.

Sara Drum & The Red Cross Physical Rehabilitation Programme

SARA DRUM - Graduate School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago - class of 1996

SARA DRUM - Graduate School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago - class of 1996

Sara Drum has spent a good deal of her professional life working under the umbrella of the Physical Rehabilitation Programme of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) providing physical rehabilitation services in some of the most dangerous cities and countries in the world: Pyongyang (Democratic Peoples’ Republic of Korea) Gaza City (Palestine), Peshawar (Pakistan), and Jalalabad and Mazar-I-Sharif (Afghanistan). Currently she is working for the ICRC in the cities of Asella and Mekelle (Ethiopia). In her various roles, Sara aims to improve the quality of physiotherapy and physical rehabilitation services within the ICRC centres. The main recipients of physical rehabilitation are those in need of prostheses, orthoses or mobility aids (walking aids, wheel chairs or assistive devices). She is also involved in management and administration of the centres. The rewards for working with the ICRC are many and varied. Sara acknowledges two: the ability to work alongside local physiotherapy staff in local communities where resources are often scarce, and as opportunities arise, developing new approaches to overcome challenging physical conditions.


Sara Drum, SARA DRUM - Graduate School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago - class of 1996, ___. 2013, Courtesy of Sara Drum .

Sara Drum giving assessment to a patient

Sara Drum giving assessment to a patient

Often a patient has trouble sitting in a wheelchair or even standing unassisted. Here Sara is reviewing a patient’s lower limb range of motion, prior to his attempting to stand in the walking frame. The photograph was taken at the ICRC Spinal Cord Injury Home Care unit, Peshawar, Pakistan.


Sara Drum, Sara Drum giving assessment to a patient, ___. 2007, Courtesy of Sara Drum.

Sara Drum assessing needs of patient in Peshawar

Sara Drum assessing needs of patient in Peshawar

Sara Drum and an assistant from the Peshawar Workplace Assessment team are assessing a patient for the right size chair, which will give him the necessary support in sitting. After receiving orthoses, a walking frame, and some training on how to mobilize, this patient opened a small shop.


Sara Drum, Sara Drum assessing needs of patient in Peshawar, ___. 2009, Courtesy of Sara Drum.

Sara Drum and colleagues at Rakrang Rehabilitation Centre, Pyongyang, North Korea

Sara Drum and colleagues at Rakrang Rehabilitation Centre, Pyongyang, North Korea

Patient assessment is a vital component of any restorative therapy. Here Sara Drum is assessing a patient with a trans-tibial amputation. A translator and one of the physiotherapy staff at Rakrang Physical Rehabilitation Centre, Pyongyang, North Korea is providing assistance.


___, Sara Drum and colleagues at Rakrang Rehabilitation Centre, Pyongyang, North Korea, ___. 2007, Courtesy of Sara Drum.

Sara Drum and North Korean colleagues

Sara Drum and North Korean colleagues

Of course it is not all work. Physiotherapist Sara Drum enjoys a lighter moment with her Korean colleagues at Rakrang Physical Rehabilitation Centre, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2007.


Sara Drum, Sara Drum and North Korean colleagues, ___. 2007, Courtesy of Sara Drum.

Towards Social Inclusion. Physical Rehabilitation Programme

Towards Social Inclusion. Physical Rehabilitation Programme

The Physical Rehabilitation Programme administered by the ICRC strives to bolster local physical rehabilitation services in order to make the services more accessible and sustainable. Rehabilitation is viewed in the wider context of vocational training, social support networks, social support and economic self-reliance to ensure those with disabilities can maximize their independence. At the practical level regaining mobility via access to walking aids and prostheses is the first and important step towards this goal. In some countries, where rehabilitation services are all but non-existent, the ICRC rehabilitation projects have been the foundation for new national services.


International Committee of the Red Cross, Towards Social Inclusion. Physical Rehabilitation Programme, Geneva, Switzerland: The Committee. 2012, http://www.icrc.org/eng/assets/files/publications/icrc-002-4160.pdf .

Towards Social Inclusion. Physical Rehabilitation Programme

Towards Social Inclusion. Physical Rehabilitation Programme

The Physical Rehabilitation Programme administered by the ICRC strives to bolster local physical rehabilitation services in order to make the services more accessible and sustainable. Rehabilitation is viewed in the wider context of vocational training, social support networks, social support and economic self-reliance to ensure those with disabilities can maximize their independence. At the practical level regaining mobility via access to walking aids and prostheses is the first and important step towards this goal. In some countries, where rehabilitation services are all but non-existent, the ICRC rehabilitation projects have been the foundation for new national services.


International Committee of the Red Cross, Towards Social Inclusion. Physical Rehabilitation Programme, Geneva, Switzerland: The Committee. 2012, http://www.icrc.org/eng/assets/files/publications/icrc-002-4160.pdf.

Physiotherapy at Otago Today

The School of Physiotherapy, Te Kura Kōmiri Pai, University of Otago, 2013. Dunedin staff

The School of Physiotherapy, Te Kura Kōmiri Pai, University of Otago, 2013. Dunedin staff

Professor David Baxter is the Dean of the School of Physiotherapy, which includes 22 academic and 15 general staff members located across the Dunedin, Wellington and Christchurch centres. Collectively, the staff comprises a substantial body of expertise covering a wide range of physiotherapy-related research, clinical and teaching areas. The School is proud of the high quality of the Otago Bachelor of Physiotherapy (BPhty) degree, and those students who enroll in it. Indeed, in 2013 some 300 students are enrolled in Years II to IV of the programme. This centennial year is also a landmark year, with the new Bachelor of Physiotherapy with Honours (BPhty Hons) programme. Five of the top achievers from Year III 2012 are undertaking this programme and will be the first to graduate in December 2013. The School also enjoys an international reputation of excellence in research and postgraduate education. The current postgraduate programme has 54 students (distance or those on campus) enrolled in doctoral, masters and post-graduate clinical programmes covering a wide range of physiotherapy-related research, and clinical skills.


Kelk Photography, Dunedin, The School of Physiotherapy, Te Kura Kōmiri Pai, University of Otago, 2013. Dunedin staff, ___. August 2012, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

School of Physiotherapy Staff, Wellington Centre

School of Physiotherapy Staff, Wellington Centre

Staff Wellington Centre of the School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, School of Physiotherapy Staff, Wellington Centre, ___. 2012, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

School of Physiotherapy Staff, Christchurch Centre<em> <br /></em>

School of Physiotherapy Staff, Christchurch Centre

School of Physiotherapy staff, University of Otago, 2012


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, School of Physiotherapy Staff, Christchurch Centre
, ___. 2012, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

The School of Physiotherapy Student Executive Association 2013

The School of Physiotherapy Student Executive Association 2013

The School of Physiotherapy Student Executive Association 2013


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, The School of Physiotherapy Student Executive Association 2013, ___. 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Barrington Physiotherapy Clinic brochure

Barrington Physiotherapy Clinic brochure

The School of Physiotherapy Clinics are located in the Dunedin, Christchurch and Wellington campuses of the University of Otago. They each form a tangible link between the School and the community by offering a wide range of physiotherapy treatment options to the general public. The clinics also provide the opportunity for undergraduate and postgraduate students to practice hands-on assessment and treatment of patients under the supervision of physiotherapy clinical educators. Peer learning is also an important component of this training. The clinics undergo practice accreditation processes which not only serve as exemplars of ‘best practice’ for students, but also for the community in which they are based. One example of the clinics’ responses to community needs is evident in post-earthquake Christchurch, where massive rebuilding is taking place. The Occupational Health physiotherapy services offered by the Christchurch Centre’s Barrington Clinic have recently been expanded to cope with the increased demand.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Barrington Physiotherapy Clinic brochure, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. 2008, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

School of Physiotherapy Clinics brochure

School of Physiotherapy Clinics brochure

The School of Physiotherapy Clinics are located in the Dunedin, Christchurch and Wellington campuses of the University of Otago. They each form a tangible link between the School and the community by offering a wide range of physiotherapy treatment options to the general public. The clinics also provide the opportunity for undergraduate and postgraduate students to practice hands-on assessment and treatment of patients under the supervision of physiotherapy clinical educators. Peer learning is also an important component of this training. The clinics undergo practice accreditation processes which not only serve as exemplars of ‘best practice’ for students, but also for the community in which they are based. One example of the clinics’ responses to community needs is evident in post-earthquake Christchurch, where massive rebuilding is taking place. The Occupational Health physiotherapy services offered by the Christchurch Centre’s Barrington Clinic have recently been expanded to cope with the increased demand.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, School of Physiotherapy Clinics brochure, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. 2008, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Research Report, 2007-2011

Research Report, 2007-2011

Academic and research staff at the School of Physiotherapy are engaged in high quality, internationally recognised research carried out under the umbrella of the Centre for Health, Physical Activity and Rehabilitation. The research focus of the Centre is directed towards understanding disability from the perspectives of impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions so as to improve and optimize the quality of life for different patient populations including those with musculoskeletal, neurological and chronic health conditions. The recognition of the importance of physical activity is reflected in a number of studies which are investigating walking as a therapeutic intervention for low back pain, and gymnasium access issues for physically disabled children. Another strong field is applied and biomechanical research, with projects undertaken to identify movement patterns associated with musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain and osteoarthritis.


School of Physiotherapy, Centre for Physiotherapy Research, University of Otago, Research Report, 2007-2011, School of Physiotherapy, Centre for Physiotherapy Research, University of Otago. July, 2012, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Rehabilitation and Disability Research Theme, 2007-2011: Ability in Everybody RDRT Colloquium, 2011

Rehabilitation and Disability Research Theme, 2007-2011: Ability in Everybody RDRT Colloquium, 2011

Academic and research staff at the School of Physiotherapy are engaged in high quality, internationally recognised research carried out under the umbrella of the Centre for Health, Physical Activity and Rehabilitation. The research focus of the Centre is directed towards understanding disability from the perspectives of impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions so as to improve and optimize the quality of life for different patient populations including those with musculoskeletal, neurological and chronic health conditions. The recognition of the importance of physical activity is reflected in a number of studies which are investigating walking as a therapeutic intervention for low back pain, and gymnasium access issues for physically disabled children. Another strong field is applied and biomechanical research, with projects undertaken to identify movement patterns associated with musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain and osteoarthritis.


University of Otago, Rehabilitation and Disability Research Theme, 2007-2011: Ability in Everybody RDRT Colloquium, 2011, University of Otago. 2011, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Report, 2005/2006

Report, 2005/2006

Academic and research staff at the School of Physiotherapy are engaged in high quality, internationally recognised research carried out under the umbrella of the Centre for Health, Physical Activity and Rehabilitation. The research focus of the Centre is directed towards understanding disability from the perspectives of impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions so as to improve and optimize the quality of life for different patient populations including those with musculoskeletal, neurological and chronic health conditions. The recognition of the importance of physical activity is reflected in a number of studies which are investigating walking as a therapeutic intervention for low back pain, and gymnasium access issues for physically disabled children. Another strong field is applied and biomechanical research, with projects undertaken to identify movement patterns associated with musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain and osteoarthritis.


Centre for Physiotherapy Research, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Report, 2005/2006, Centre for Physiotherapy Research, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. [2007], School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Centre for Health, Activity, and Rehabilitation Research

Centre for Health, Activity, and Rehabilitation Research

Academic and research staff at the School of Physiotherapy are engaged in high quality, internationally recognised research carried out under the umbrella of the Centre for Health, Physical Activity and Rehabilitation. The research focus of the Centre is directed towards understanding disability from the perspectives of impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions so as to improve and optimize the quality of life for different patient populations including those with musculoskeletal, neurological and chronic health conditions. The recognition of the importance of physical activity is reflected in a number of studies which are investigating walking as a therapeutic intervention for low back pain, and gymnasium access issues for physically disabled children. Another strong field is applied and biomechanical research, with projects undertaken to identify movement patterns associated with musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain and osteoarthritis.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Centre for Health, Activity, and Rehabilitation Research, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. [2013], School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Research Activity 2012

Research Activity 2012

Academic and research staff at the School of Physiotherapy are engaged in high quality, internationally recognised research carried out under the umbrella of the Centre for Health, Physical Activity and Rehabilitation. The research focus of the Centre is directed towards understanding disability from the perspectives of impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions so as to improve and optimize the quality of life for different patient populations including those with musculoskeletal, neurological and chronic health conditions. The recognition of the importance of physical activity is reflected in a number of studies which are investigating walking as a therapeutic intervention for low back pain, and gymnasium access issues for physically disabled children. Another strong field is applied and biomechanical research, with projects undertaken to identify movement patterns associated with musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain and osteoarthritis.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Research Activity 2012, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. 2012, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

School of Physiotherapy post-graduate and distance learning programme brochures

School of Physiotherapy post-graduate and distance learning programme brochures

The School of Physiotherapy offers a range of postgraduate programmes intended for practising physiotherapists who wish to extend their learning and enhance their clinical practice skills. There are four levels of study: the Postgraduate Certificate, the Postgraduate Diploma, Master’s, and Doctor of Philosophy. The School offers a mix of residential and distance learning options. In 2013, clinical postgraduate programmes include acupuncture, neurorehabilitation, manipulative therapy, occupational health, and sports physiotherapy.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, School of Physiotherapy post-graduate and distance learning programme brochures, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago. 2010, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Walls

De humani corporis fabrica

De humani corporis fabrica

Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) is the Latinized name of Flemish-born anatomist and physician Andries van Wezel. Vesalius taught at Padua University in Northern Italy where he instructed in anatomy and surgery and dissected corpses during classes for the increased benefit of his students learning, a practice traditionally frowned upon. His hugely influential anatomical treatise De humani corporis fabrica (‘On the structure of the human body’), published in 1543, was highly regarded for the meticulous attention to detail in its engravings and it contained the first published true to life depictions of the complex anatomical structure of the human body.


Andreas Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica, [Basel: Joannis Oporini]. 1555, Monro Collection M306.

Bachelor of Physiotherapy with Honours Students 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago

Bachelor of Physiotherapy with Honours Students 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago

The five students enrolled in the BPHTY with Honours programme, offered for the first time by the School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago in 2013. From left: Jennifer A. Milford, Carla Cameron, Anita L. Krammer, Hannah L. Walker and Tayler L. Walter.


School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Bachelor of Physiotherapy with Honours Students 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, ___. 2013, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago .

Muscles Testing and Function

Muscles Testing and Function

This muscle chart used to evaluate the strength in the abdominal wall was typical of those designed for patients suffering from poliomyelitis (polio). Such charts were used to determine the kind and amount of exercise therapy for an individual. They also provided a quick visual reference for the physiotherapist as to their patient’s progress.


H. O and P. O Kendall, Muscles Testing and Function, Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins Company. 1949, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

'An exercise programme for patients with ischaemic heart disease' : New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, volume 3

'An exercise programme for patients with ischaemic heart disease' : New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, volume 3

This stick figure diagram illustrates the range of exercises recommended for individuals with ischaemic heart disease.


P. Wood and E. Nye, 'An exercise programme for patients with ischaemic heart disease' : New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, volume 3, ___. 1970, Image courtesy Physiotherapy New Zealand.

Leonard Ring video series

Leonard Ring video series

The cover images from the series of videos produced by physiotherapist and ergonomist Leonard Ring about safe lifting techniques and correct use of the spine in the work place.


Leonard Ring, Leonard Ring video series, ___. ___, Courtesy Polly Ring.

Phoenix Club cartoon

Phoenix Club cartoon

This cartoon featured in the Otago Daily Times in 1977 depicts the extensive and varied tramping trips undertaken by members of the Dunedin Phoenix Club and the difficulty that family members often had in keeping up. The accompanying article by physiotherapist Nancy Grant (née Galloway) detailed recent tramping trips undertaken by the Club to the Milford, Routeburn and Hollyford Walks. As testimony to the cartoon, a further tramp, accompanied by the University Army Medical Corps, was planned to the Carrick Ranges near Queenstown.


Sid Scales, Phoenix Club cartoon, Otago Daily Times. 10 October, 1977, Image: S13-584. Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena, University of Otago.

De Beer Gallery, University of Otago

De Beer Gallery, University of Otago

Wall posters in the Reaching Out:Celebrating 100 years of Otago Physiotherapy Graduates, 1913-2013 exhibition.


___, De Beer Gallery, University of Otago, ___. October 2013, Special Collections.

Vitrines

Vitrine One: Scholarship by Graduates of the School of Physiotherapy

Vitrine One: Scholarship by Graduates of the School of Physiotherapy

A selection of the many books authored and/or edited by current and former staff and graduates from the School of Physiotherapy reflect the wide span of professional interests of these individuals.


___, Vitrine One: Scholarship by Graduates of the School of Physiotherapy, ___. October 2013, University of Otago Library Books.

Vitrine Two: Physiotherapy Electrical Equipment

Vitrine Two: Physiotherapy Electrical Equipment

Electrotherapy came into vogue in physiotherapy from the 1920s and is now used for a variety of therapeutic purposes such as stimulating muscles, providing pain relief via various forms of heating and the selective stimulation of sensory nerves. The large glass tube (triode valve), bottom left, is from a short-wave diathermy machine and is designed to produce high frequency electromagnetic waves. Short-wave diathermy was primarily used to produce heat in the tissues and its premise was based on the physiological effects resulting from the rise in temperature. The Lewis Jones Induction Coil (top right) operates on two dry cells. The device is designed to produce an uneven induced (faradic current) current with impulses each lasting up to one millisecond at a rate of approximately 50 cycles per second. The resulting contraction has the closest resemblance to a voluntary contraction that can be produced by electrical stimulation. The Smart-Bristow Faradic Coil (bottom right) was a highly popular form of physiotherapy treatment used to stimulate nerves supplying non-paralysed muscles in the polio era from the 1920s to 1960s. One of the special features of this device was the method of regulating the strength of the current for the comfort of the patient by varying the depth of insertion of the iron core on the side of the box. The portable cold quartz lamp (top left) is designed to produce short ultraviolet rays for antibacterial effects with the various shaped glass rods used in the treatment of infection of the skin as well as of the mucous membranes.


___, Vitrine Two: Physiotherapy Electrical Equipment, ___. October 2013, Equipment from the School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Vitrine Three: Early Children's Toys from the Vera Hayward Clinic

Vitrine Three: Early Children's Toys from the Vera Hayward Clinic

In many ways these toys serve to symbolise one end of the age range of individuals who seek treatment from physiotherapists. The toys date from the 1960s and are part of a collection which is permanently housed in the Vera Hayward Child Development Centre at Dunedin Hospital. Vera Hayward, the person after whom the clinic is named, was a strong political advocate for physiotherapy education in Dunedin in her role as a member on the Dunedin Hospital Board. Vera was also renowned for being a generous host for Sunday high teas to numerous physiotherapy students. Since its opening in 1974, the Vera Hayward Clinic has served children in Otago with disabilities and special needs and has maintained strong links with the School of Physiotherapy by providing paediatric clinical placements for students from the School.


___, Vitrine Three: Early Children's Toys from the Vera Hayward Clinic, ___. October 2013, Toy Collection courtesy of Jill Maslin, Vera Hayward Child Development Centre, Dunedin Hospital; Early rocking toy courtesy of Shirley Holdaway .

Vitrine Four: Suspension Therapy

Vitrine Four: Suspension Therapy

Suspension therapy as a rehabilitative treatment has had a long history. Indeed, Roman medical scholar Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – 50 AD) advocated it long ago in his work De Medicina. Francis Guthrie-Smith, a British trained physiotherapist at St Mary’s Hospital, London, was largely responsible for realising the therapeutic potential of suspension therapy in physiotherapy. To this end, Guthrie-Smith and Arthur Porritt (1900-94), orthopedic surgeon and former Governor General of New Zealand, published a paper in the British Medical Journal (1931) describing the use of suspension therapy in rehabilitation for conditions such as poliomyelitis (polio) and fractures. Here is a range of suspension therapy equipment which has played its part in the time honoured approach to facilitating movement.


___, Vitrine Four: Suspension Therapy, ___. October 2013, Suspension Therapy Equipment: School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago.

Suspension Therapy in Rehabilitation

Suspension Therapy in Rehabilitation

Advocated by Roman medical scholar Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – 50 AD), in his work De Medicina, suspension therapy as a rehabilitative treatment has a long history. Olive Frances Guthrie Smith (1883-1956), a British trained physiotherapist at St Mary’s Hospital, London, was largely responsible for realising the therapeutic potential of suspension therapy in physiotherapy. To this end, Guthrie Smith and Arthur Porritt (1900-94), orthopaedic surgeon and former Governor General of New Zealand, published a paper in the British Medical Journal (1931) describing the use of suspension therapy in rehabilitation for conditions such as poliomyelitis (polio) and fractures.


Margaret Hollis and Margaret H. S. Roper, Suspension Therapy in Rehabilitation, London: Ballière, Tindall and Cox. 1958, Private Collection.

Suspension Therapy in Rehabilitation

Suspension Therapy in Rehabilitation

Advocated by Roman medical scholar Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – 50 AD), in his work De Medicina, suspension therapy as a rehabilitative treatment has a long history. Olive Frances Guthrie Smith (1883-1956), a British trained physiotherapist at St Mary’s Hospital, London, was largely responsible for realising the therapeutic potential of suspension therapy in physiotherapy. To this end, Guthrie Smith and Arthur Porritt (1900-94), orthopaedic surgeon and former Governor General of New Zealand, published a paper in the British Medical Journal (1931) describing the use of suspension therapy in rehabilitation for conditions such as poliomyelitis (polio) and fractures.


Margaret Hollis and Margaret H. S. Roper, Suspension Therapy in Rehabilitation, London: Ballière, Tindall and Cox. 1958, Private Collection.