Recent Additions to Special Collections is an exhibition that started on 20 December 2013 in the de Beer Gallery, Special Collections, University of Otago Library. The exhibition offers a wide variety of materials on display that have been added to Special Collections by purchase or donation over the last three to four years. Not only is it an admirable opportunity to reveal what is actually collected in Special Collections, but importantly, it is an opportunity to thank all the donors for their kind generosity in giving materials to us, and to all those dealers and individuals who have supplied rare and interesting books to the collection.

The old favourites such as 18th century literature, garden history, art and architecture, travel, and works by and about John Evelyn, John Locke, and the English poet Robert Graves are present. There are also new fields of collecting such as pulp fiction and science fiction (SF); the latter 'teleported' through the generosity of Prof. Fred Fastier, and the family of the late Dr Hal Salive (Waikanae). Other items have been acquired because of their historical significance or because they fill a visible gap in the existing collection.

Items of note on display include a first edition of Mungo Park's Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa (1799); a 1792 edition of Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man; Fanny Burney's Evelina (1784); a third edition of Thomas de Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-eater (1823); a limited edition of Bram Stoker's Dracula (2008); a facsimile of William Blake's 'Satan, Sin, and Death: Satan Comes to the Gates of Hell' from Thirteen Watercolor Drawings by William Blake illustrating Paradise Lost by John Milton. (2004); a facsimile of Carl Gustav Jung's famed The Red Book (2009); and a wonderful selection of SF and Pulp titles like Thomas Blanchard Dewey's The Girl with the Sweet Plump Knees (1963), Brett Halliday's Murder is My Business (1945), and H. G. Wells's The Invisible Man (2004).

There is slow and steady growth in Special Collections. In this way Special Collections not only maintains collecting relevance for the future, but also it continues to provide choice materials of interest to researchers in and outside the University, as well as to the wider reading public.

Poster (5.1MB in PDF format)

Handlist (3.8MB in PDF format)

Introduction

‘Satan, Sin, and Death: Satan Comes to the Gates of Hell’ from Thirteen Watercolor Drawings by William Blake illustrating Paradise Lost by John Milton

‘Satan, Sin, and Death: Satan Comes to the Gates of Hell’ from Thirteen Watercolor Drawings by William Blake illustrating Paradise Lost by John Milton

William Blake (1757-1827) regarded John Milton’s Paradise Lost as an important English epic poem. Twice he was commissioned to illustrate it, applying his own unique interpretation to the text. This is the full-scale colour facsimile of Satan, Sin, and Death: Satan Comes to the Gates of Hell, which Blake completed in 1806. This Arion Press publication of 2004 also contains the first series of 12 images commissioned by Joseph Thomas in 1807, including another watercolour of Satan, Sin, and Death: Satan Comes to the Gates of Hell that differs slightly from the image here. This limited edition publication – no. 29 of 400 copies – is a significant addition to the materials already held in Special Collections of this important British artist-poet.

William Blake, ‘Satan, Sin, and Death: Satan Comes to the Gates of Hell’ from Thirteen Watercolor Drawings by William Blake illustrating Paradise Lost by John Milton. San Francisco: Arion Press, 2004. Special Collections NC242 B55 A77 2004

Paradise Lost: a Poem in Twelve Books

Paradise Lost: a Poem in Twelve Books

John Milton (1608-1674) was blind when he completed the text of Paradise Lost. Over the years, scribal and transmission errors, variant spellings, punctuation, capitalizations, and additions have cast doubt on the text’s reliability. By modernizing the text, reducing inconsistencies, and applying judicious attention to various words and phrases, John T. Shawcross has provided a new and ‘definitive’ edition for Milton scholars. In printing this edition, Andrew Hoyem (of Arion Press) pays tribute to the John Baskerville edition of 1759, and the second edition of Paradise Lost of 1674, the year that Milton died. This was when the poem was divided into 12 books.

John Milton, Paradise Lost: a Poem in Twelve Books. San Francisco: Printed by Andrew Hoyem at The Arion Press, 2002. Special Collections PR3560 2002

Paradise Lost: a Poem in Twelve Books

Paradise Lost: a Poem in Twelve Books

John Milton (1608-1674) was blind when he completed the text of Paradise Lost. Over the years, scribal and transmission errors, variant spellings, punctuation, capitalizations, and additions have cast doubt on the text’s reliability. By modernizing the text, reducing inconsistencies, and applying judicious attention to various words and phrases, John T. Shawcross has provided a new and ‘definitive’ edition for Milton scholars. In printing this edition, Andrew Hoyem (of Arion Press) pays tribute to the John Baskerville edition of 1759, and the second edition of Paradise Lost of 1674, the year that Milton died. This was when the poem was divided into 12 books. Here is a portion of the text that provided Blake with the inspiration to produce his Satan, Sin, and Death image.

John Milton, Paradise Lost: a Poem in Twelve Books. San Francisco: Printed by Andrew Hoyem at The Arion Press, 2002. Special Collections PR3560 2002

John Buckland Wright: Illustrator

John Buckland Wright: Illustrator

John Buckland Wright (JBW) was born in Dunedin in 1897. He left New Zealand in 1908 and eventually became one of the world’s best book engravers of the 1930s, 40s and 50s. Special Collections aims to amass a comprehensive collection of his works, especially in book-format. Although published in 1960, the 14 engravings made to illustrate Iwan Gilkin’s Le Sphinx actually antedate his first published work, The Collected Sonnets by John Keats (1930). Thus they are JBW’s first book-illustrations, and apart from two, were never previously published. This limited edition portfolio of 250 copies was purchased locally.

Alexander A. M. Stols, John Buckland Wright: Illustrator. Antwerp: Graphia, 1960. Special Collections NE1147.6 B83 SV56

The Red Book = Liber Novus. First edition

The Red Book = Liber Novus. First edition

‘Do you not hear something?’; ‘I’m not aware of anything, what should I hear?’ So begins the portion headed ‘The Gift of Magic’ in this full colour facsimile of C. G. Jung’s The Red Book. Jung created this ‘book’ between 1914 and 1930, it being the end-result of a period of self-examination which he termed his ‘confrontation with the unconscious.’ This is the first appearance of what is claimed to be an integral part of the psychologist’s own oeuvre, and as such is regarded by many as the most important publication for psychology in the 21st century. An English translation accompanies the text, which apart from documenting Jung’s own thought-processes, also reveals his abilities as a calligrapher and artist. This facsimile was donated to Special Collections.

Carl Gustav Jung, The Red Book = Liber Novus. First edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2009. Special Collections BF109 J8 A3 2009

The Red Book = Liber Novus. First edition

The Red Book = Liber Novus. First edition

‘Do you not hear something?’; ‘I’m not aware of anything, what should I hear?’ So begins the portion headed ‘The Gift of Magic’ in this full colour facsimile of C. G. Jung’s The Red Book. Jung created this ‘book’ between 1914 and 1930, it being the end-result of a period of self-examination which he termed his ‘confrontation with the unconscious.’ This is the first appearance of what is claimed to be an integral part of the psychologist’s own oeuvre, and as such is regarded by many as the most important publication for psychology in the 21st century. An English translation accompanies the text, which apart from documenting Jung’s own thought-processes, also reveals his abilities as a calligrapher and artist. This facsimile was donated to Special Collections.

Carl Gustav Jung, The Red Book = Liber Novus. First edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2009. Special Collections BF109 J8 A3 2009

Architecture

A Parallel of the Antient Architecture with the Modern: in a Collection of Ten Principal Authors. Third Edition

A Parallel of the Antient Architecture with the Modern: in a Collection of Ten Principal Authors. Third Edition

Dr Esmond de Beer collected books by John Evelyn (1620-1706), diarist, gardener, and Fellow of the Royal Society. In 1983, de Beer gave to Special Collections his Evelyn Collection of some 1000 works, which included his own meticulously edited The Diary of John Evelyn (1955) and a first English edition of Roland Fréart’s A Parallel of the Antient Architecture with the Modern (1664), which was translated by John Evelyn. In October 2009, a third edition (1723) of this classic work by the French architectural theorist was donated to Special Collections. It arrived somewhat circuitously via a Canterbury bookseller, a Dunedin bookseller, and the Office of the Vice Chancellor. It is in superb condition.

Roland Fréart, A Parallel of the Antient Architecture with the Modern: in a Collection of Ten Principal Authors. Third Edition. London: Printed by T. W. for D. Browne, [and six others], 1723. de Beer Ec 1723 F

Palladio’s Homes

Palladio’s Homes

There are 27 titles relating to Andrea Palladio (1508-1580) in Special Collections, including Descriptio Brevissima Priscae Urbis Romae (1544), his famous I Qvattro Libri dell ‘Architettvra (1581), and an English version called The Elements of Civil Architecture (1864). Palladio is very important in the history of Western architecture, and was well known for his designs of villas. This limited edition publication by The Old School Press of Palladio’s Homes (2009) was a certainty for inclusion. Colourful, with a bi-lingual text, it offers succinct Palladian principles of design and form on the domestic home. Villa Godi (Vicenza) was one of the first projects undertaken by Palladio; it is now designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

___, Palladio’s Homes. Bath, England: Old School Press , 2009. Special Collections NA1123 P2 A35 2009

Travel

Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa

Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa

On arriving in Africa in 1795, Mungo Park (1771-1806) had one major aim: to discover the source of the Niger River. With two guides, a horse, a compass, an umbrella, and a tall hat (where he kept his notes), he crossed the Senegal basin, and desert regions of Kaarta. Imprisoned for four months, he escaped and eventually reached the Niger River at Segou on 21 July 1796; he was the first European to do so. Park’s Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa first appeared in 1799. An honest and unadorned account of his expedition, it was an instant success. Part of the route Park took is displayed here (the double line of dots, coloured red) in this first edition. As an acknowledged classic in the travel genre, it was a worthy purchase.

Mungo Park, Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa. London: Printed by W. Bulmer and Co. for the Author, 1799. de Beer Eb 1799 P

Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa

Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa

Some 45 years after Park’s first expedition, fellow Scot and ‘medical missionary’ David Livingstone (1813-1873) embarked on his own explorations into ‘Darkest Africa’. Although Livingstone was wrong about the source of the Nile, he (re)-discovered other important geographical features such as Lake Ngami (1849), the Zambezi River (1851), and Victoria Falls (November 1855), named after Queen Victoria but previously known as Mosi-oa-Tunya (‘the smoke that thunders’). Livingstone’s Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa (1857) carries a striking lithograph of the Falls and the classic statement within: ‘Scenes so lovely must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight.’ Livingstone was the first European to see the Falls. This first edition was purchased locally.

David Livingstone, Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa. London: John Murray, 1857. de Beer Eb 1857 L

Donations

An Universal Dictionary of the Marine. New ed. corrected

An Universal Dictionary of the Marine. New ed. corrected

In 2012 some 30 architectural books were donated to Special Collections by the family of the late Niel Wales (1927-2011). They included Edward Blore’s Monumental Remains of Noble and Eminent Persons (1826); Thomas Chippendale’s Gentleman & Cabinet-makers Director. 3rd ed. [1862]; and Matthew Dubourg’s Views of the Remains of Ancient Buildings in Rome (1820); each in their own way must have helped Wales in his work as a partner in Mason and Wales, the oldest practising architectural firm in New Zealand. This is a page from Falconer’s Dictionary, which is rich in engravings of the structural details of wooden ships.

William Falconer, An Universal Dictionary of the Marine. New ed. corrected. London: Printed for T. Cadell, 1776. de Beer Eb 1776 F

[Drawings of architectural detailing]

[Drawings of architectural detailing]

In 2012 some 30 architectural books were donated to Special Collections by the family of the late Niel Wales (1927-2011). They included Edward Blore’s Monumental Remains of Noble and Eminent Persons (1826); Thomas Chippendale’s Gentleman & Cabinet-makers Director. 3rd ed. [1862]; and Matthew Dubourg’s Views of the Remains of Ancient Buildings in Rome (1820); each in their own way must have helped Wales in his work as a partner in Mason and Wales, the oldest practising architectural firm in New Zealand. This is a page from a scrapbook that contains numerous illustrations of English buildings and hand-drawn architectural ornaments.

___, [Drawings of architectural detailing]. Dunedin, c. 1890s. Special Collections NA2841 D728 1890

Purchases & Gifts

Rights of Man: Being an Answer to Mr. Burke’s Attack on the French Revolution: Part I & II

Rights of Man: Being an Answer to Mr. Burke’s Attack on the French Revolution: Part I & II

Following the purchase of a 1794 edition of Thomas Paine’s The Age of Reason, Special Collections recently obtained his The Rights of Man (1792), a controversial work written as an answer to Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France. Paine was an advocate of republicanism and this work contains his belief that men had ‘natural rights’. He also urged that individuals had every right to free themselves from governmental tyranny. Such seditious talk caused Paine to be labelled an outlaw in England; he was forced to flee to France.

Thomas Paine , Rights of Man: Being an Answer to Mr. Burke’s Attack on the French Revolution: Part I & II. London: Printed for the Booksellers, 1792. de Beer Eb 1792

Notorious Frauds of the Romish Priests and Jesuits, Discovered in the Tragical History of Jetzer, an Imposture. 4th ed.

Notorious Frauds of the Romish Priests and Jesuits, Discovered in the Tragical History of Jetzer, an Imposture. 4th ed.

In 2009, Special Collections accepted the transfer of over 200 pre-1800 printed books from Waikato University, Hamilton. The books received were particularly strong in 18th century literature, religion (especially religious controversies), science (especially optics) and philosophy. Notorious Frauds of the Romish Priests and Jesuits (1692) is but one title received. This ‘rant’ was anonymously penned by politician Sir William Waller (1639-1699), a reprint of his earlier Tragedy of Jetzer (1680). Waller was himself a ‘notorious’ anti-Catholic. This 4th edition copy is of particular interest. It was once owned by a 17th century female reader – ‘Jane Gray, 1695’ – and there are only two surviving copies: one at Otago; the other at the British Library.

[Sir William Waller], Notorious Frauds of the Romish Priests and Jesuits, Discovered in the Tragical History of Jetzer, an Imposture. 4th ed.. London: Printed for the Booksellers of London and Westminster, 1692. de Beer Eb 1692 N

Almanzor and Almahide, or, The Conquest of Granada by the Spaniards: a Tragedy

Almanzor and Almahide, or, The Conquest of Granada by the Spaniards: a Tragedy

As a poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright, John Dryden (1631-1700) played a dominant literary role in Restoration England. Indeed, the period in which he lived is often styled the Age of Dryden, a phrase familiar to many literary students. Some of the 18th century titles received from Waikato were dis-bound and needed conservation treatment. Others, like this illustrated edition of Almanzor and Almahide, or, The Conquest of Granada (1735), were much sturdier. Dryden’s heroic tragedy was first staged from December 1670 to January 1671 and eventually printed in 1672. ‘Pretty, witty Nell’ Gwyn, Charles II’s mistress, played Almahide.

John Dryden, Almanzor and Almahide, or, The Conquest of Granada by the Spaniards: a Tragedy. London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, 1735. de Beer Eb 1735 D

Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on Morals and Happiness. 2nd ed. corrected

Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on Morals and Happiness. 2nd ed. corrected

As a complement to the 3rd edition of Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1796), Special Collections secured a 2nd edition of William Godwin’s Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on Morals and Happiness (1796), a work that openly attacked political institutions. Godwin (1756–1836), a radical philosopher who believed that humanity will inevitably progress, married Wollstonecraft in 1797. In the third person, he wrote in the Preface: ‘It is now twelve years since he became satisfied that monarchy was a species of government essentially corrupt. He owed this conviction to the political writings of Swift and to a perusal of the Latin historians.’ Godwin remains an influential figure in 18th century British literature and literary culture.

William Godwin, Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on Morals and Happiness. 2nd ed. corrected. London: Printed for G. G. and J. Robinson, 1796. de Beer Eb 1796 G

Pulps

Case of the Vanishing Beauty

Case of the Vanishing Beauty

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This title is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Richard S. Prather, Case of the Vanishing Beauty. London: Muller, 1963. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3531 R14 C37 1963

The Girl with the Sweet Plump Knees

The Girl with the Sweet Plump Knees

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Thomas Blanchard Dewey, The Girl with the Sweet Plump Knees. New York: Dell, 1963. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3507 E883 G57 1963

Murder is My Business

Murder is My Business

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Brett Halliday, Murder is My Business. New York: Dell, 1945. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3507 R615 M87 1945

The Burglar who studied Spinoza

The Burglar who studied Spinoza

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Lawrence Block, The Burglar who studied Spinoza. Harpenden, Herts, England: No Exit Press, 1993. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3552 L63 B87 1993

The Burglar in the Library

The Burglar in the Library

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Lawrence Block , The Burglar in the Library. Harpenden, Herts, England: No Exit Press, 1998. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3552 L63 B845 1998

The Burglar who thought He was Bogart

The Burglar who thought He was Bogart

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Lawrence Block, The Burglar who thought He was Bogart. Harpenden, Herts, England: No Exit Press, 1996. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3552 L63 B875 1996

The Paperback Art of James Avati

The Paperback Art of James Avati

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Piet Schreuders and Kenneth Fulton, The Paperback Art of James Avati. Hampton Falls, New Hampshire: Donald M. Grant, 2005. Special Collections Oversize ND237 A84 SC14

Kiss Me, Deadly

Kiss Me, Deadly

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Mickey Spillane, Kiss Me, Deadly. New York: New American Library, 1953. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3537 P652 K57 1953

The Colorado Kid

The Colorado Kid

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Stephen King, The Colorado Kid. New York: Dorchester Pub., 2005. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3561 I483 C64 2005

I, the Jury

I, the Jury

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

Mickey Spillane , I, the Jury. London: Arthur Barker, 1952. Pulp (Special Collections) PS3537 P652 I2 1952

You Never Know with Women

You Never Know with Women

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

James Hadley Chase, You Never Know with Women. Chatswood, Australia: Harlequin Mills & Boon, 2009. Pulp (Special Collections) PR6005 H36 Y68 2009

Jilted

Jilted

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years. Rachael Johns’s Jilted was a book that was given away free to Qantas Executive Club flyers in 2012. It was a joint promotion with Harlequin (Australia).

Rachael Johns, Jilted. Chatswood, Australia: Harlequin Mira, 2012. Pulp (Special Collections) PR9612 J653 J54 2012

I’ll Bury My Dead

I’ll Bury My Dead

Since the acquisition of the Australian Pulp Fiction Collection in 2005, Special Collections has been steadily obtaining new pulp fiction titles and pertinent reference works. This is just one of a small number of titles garnered over the last four to five years.

James Hadley Chase, I’ll Bury My Dead. Chatswood, Australia: Harlequin Mills & Boon, 2009. Pulp (Special Collections) PR6005 H36 I44 2009

Transfers - Monro Medical rare books and Expedition reports

Dissertatio Secunda. de Sede et Caussa Coloris Aethiopum et Caeterorum Hominum. Accedunt Icones Coloribus Distinctae

Dissertatio Secunda. de Sede et Caussa Coloris Aethiopum et Caeterorum Hominum. Accedunt Icones Coloribus Distinctae

The Monro Collection of medical rare books and manuscripts once belonged to Alexander Monro Primus (1697-1767), and following generations AM Secundus (1733-1817) and AM Tertius (1773-1859). Together these men monopolised the teaching of anatomy at the University of Edinburgh for well over 100 years. Monro Tertius bequeathed the collection to his son Sir David Monro (1813-1877), who emigrated to New Zealand. In 1929, Dr Charles Monro Hector, a graduate of Otago Medical School, and Sir David’s grandson, encouraged the transfer of the collection to the Medical School Library. In 2012 it was transferred to Special Collections. This is a treatise by the Dutch anatomist, Bernhard Siegfried Albinus (1697-1770). The coloured plate depicts a partially dissected scrotum and urethra.

Bernhard Siegfried Albinus , Dissertatio Secunda. de Sede et Caussa Coloris Aethiopum et Caeterorum Hominum. Accedunt Icones Coloribus Distinctae. [Leiden: With Theodore Haak…], [1737]. Monro Collection M4

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’, under the Command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross, R.N., F.R.S, during the years 1839-1843. Volume I: Mammalia, Birds

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’, under the Command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross, R.N., F.R.S, during the years 1839-1843. Volume I: Mammalia, Birds

In 2013, some 250 Scientific Expedition Reports were transferred to Special Collections from the Science Library. These Reports range in date from 1832 to 1960, and detail expeditions made to the Arctic, the Antarctic, Uganda, Patagonia, and Arnhem Land. This image depicts Strigops habroptilus, or the Kakapo, New Zealand’s flightless parrot and is from the Reports of the Erebus and Terror expedition that set sail from Chatham in Kent, England on 29 September, 1839. Led by Captain Sir James Clark Ross, the ships took a circuitous route to the South Pole, visiting many islands in the Atlantic, and Australia and New Zealand.

Edited by John Richardson and John Edward Grey , The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’, under the Command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross, R.N., F.R.S, during the years 1839-1843. Volume I: Mammalia, Birds. London: E. W. Janson,, 1844-1875. Expeditions (Special Collections) Q115 E67 1839

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’, under the Command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross, R.N., F.R.S, during the years 1839-1843. Volume I: Mammalia, Birds

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’, under the Command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross, R.N., F.R.S, during the years 1839-1843. Volume I: Mammalia, Birds

In 2013, some 250 Scientific Expedition Reports were transferred to Special Collections from the Science Library. These Reports range in date from 1832 to 1960, and detail expeditions made to the Arctic, the Antarctic, Uganda, Patagonia, and Arnhem Land. This image shows three shrew-like marsupials found in Australia and is from the Reports of the Erebus and Terror expedition that set sail from Chatham in Kent, England on 29 September, 1839. Led by Captain Sir James Clark Ross, the ships took a circuitous route to the South Pole, visiting many islands in the Atlantic, and Australia and New Zealand.

Edited by John Richardson and John Edward Grey, The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’, under the Command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross, R.N., F.R.S, during the years 1839-1843. Volume I: Mammalia, Birds. London: E. W. Janson, 1844-1875. Expeditions (Special Collections) Q115 E67 1839

Moderns

Cards, Women and Wine

Cards, Women and Wine

The 19th century French novelist Charles Paul de Kock (1791-1871) wrote about 100 titles, many of them depicting urban life in Paris. Once extremely popular, they soon lost favour with readers. Indeed, by 1905 they were described as ‘rather vulgar, but not immoral, demanding no literary training and gratifying no delicate taste’ (New International Encyclopedia). Bree Narran, the pseudonym of the Australian politician William Nicholas Willis, translated de Kock’s work under the imprint of his own London-based Anglo-Eastern Publishing Company. He too wrote ‘racy’ romances, many of them selling well during the years 1910 and 1923. This title and other de Kock ‘pulps’ were donated to Special Collections in 2012.

Paul de Kock , Cards, Women and Wine. London: Anglo-Eastern Pub. Co., [c.1920?] . Pulp Fiction (Special Collections) PR 9610 N37 C37

Dracula

Dracula

‘3 May. Bistritz. – Left Munich at 8.35 p.m. on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6.46, but the train was an hour late.’ So begins Bram Stoker’s Dracula, an epistolary novel that features Count Dracula, ‘a tall old man, clean shaven save for a long white moustache’. Stoker initially called the novel ‘The Dead Un-Dead’ and had Dracula as ‘Count Wampyr’. This Folio Society edition, illustrated by Abigail Rorer, is based on the first edition of 1897.

Bram Stoker, Dracula. London: Folio Society, 2008. Special Collections PR6037 T617 D7 2008

On the Road

On the Road

The first draft of what was to become Jack Kerouac’s On the Road was written on a scroll, some 120 feet of tracing paper that the author cut and taped together. Written over a three week period in 1951, it was tapped out single-spaced, with no margins or paragraph breaks. It was eventually published by Viking Press in 1957. Depicting the exploits of Salvatore Paradise (Kerouac) and Dean Moriarty (Neal Cassady), the book is now regarded as the high-point representative of the ‘Beat Generation’; a must-read for those interested in post-war America.

Jack Kerouac, On the Road. London: Folio Society, 2010. Special Collections PS3521 E735 O5 2010

On the Road

On the Road

The first draft of what was to become Jack Kerouac’s On the Road was written on a scroll, some 120 feet of tracing paper that the author cut and taped together. Written over a three week period in 1951, it was tapped out single-spaced, with no margins or paragraph breaks. It was eventually published by Viking Press in 1957. Depicting the exploits of Salvatore Paradise (Kerouac) and Dean Moriarty (Neal Cassady), the book is now regarded as the high-point representative of the ‘Beat Generation’; a must-read for those interested in post-war America. This evocative photograph in this Folio Society edition is of Times Square, New York.

Jack Kerouac, On the Road. London: Folio Society, 2010. Special Collections PS3521 E735 O5 2010

My Life and Loves. Vol. I

My Life and Loves. Vol. I

Frank Harris’s My Life and Loves was purchased to form part of the ‘modern’ contingent in the very successful ‘Banned Books’ exhibition in Special Collections in 2009. Privately printed in Paris in 1925, this particular edition was not allowed to be imported into England or the U.S.A. Often shipped in plain brown wrappers, it was, if discovered, summarily destroyed; having been judged indecent. John Sumner, zealous member of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, called it the ‘most obscene book published in the present century.’

Frank Harris, My Life and Loves. Vol. I. Paris: Obelisk Press Books; Les Editions du chêne, 1949. Special Collections PR4759 H37 M9 1949

James Hogg & Robert Graves

The Mountain Bard: Consisting of Ballads and Songs, Founded on Facts and Legendary Tales

The Mountain Bard: Consisting of Ballads and Songs, Founded on Facts and Legendary Tales

During the 1960s and 70s, the Gilkison family of Dunedin gifted to the University of Otago Library numerous books by and manuscripts related to the Scottish poet James Hogg (1770-1835), widely known as the Ettrick Shepherd. Manuscript letters from John G. Lockhart, Thomas Pringle, and Sir Walter Scott sit with first and second editions, including The Spy, a rare volume. The Mountain Bard was Hogg’s first collection of poetry, and on Sir Walter Scott’s recommendation, it was published by Constable in February 1807. In an effort to complete our Hogg holdings, this first edition was obtained. Note the re-use of the engraving dated 1803 for the ‘Highland Heroism’ frontispiece.

James Hogg, The Mountain Bard: Consisting of Ballads and Songs, Founded on Facts and Legendary Tales. Edinburgh: Printed by J. Ballantyne for Arch. Constable and John Murray, London, 1807. Special Collections – Hogg Collection PR4791 M68 1807

Mador of the Moor: a Poem

Mador of the Moor: a Poem

Another Hogg title that Special Collections lacked was Mador of the Moor, an historical romance in five cantos which was published in 1816 by William Blackwood. Most of this love-story about a farmer’s daughter being wooed by the King of Scotland (in disguise) was written by Hogg in 1813 when he was staying at Kinnaird House, the home of his friend Eliza Izett, near Dunkeld, Perthshire. Somewhat unfairly, it has been compared to Scott’s outpourings, deemed by some as a ‘second-hand Lady of the Lake’. This particular copy was once in the library of Ian Jack (b.1945), the Scottish journalist and editor.

James Hogg, Mador of the Moor: a Poem. Edinburgh: William Blackwood, 1816. Special Collections – Hogg Collection PR4791 M3 1816

Dear Robert, Dear Spike: the Graves-Milligan Correspondence

Dear Robert, Dear Spike: the Graves-Milligan Correspondence

As Pauline Scudamore writes in her introduction: ‘You could not, at first glance, find a more unlikely pair than the erudite poet Robert Graves, classical scholar, writer and late professor of Poetry at Oxford and the apparently crazy ex-Goon Spike Milligan.’ Their correspondence began in 1964 and their friendship lasted until Graves died in 1985. Charles Brasch liked Graves as a poet and funded the University of Otago Library to buy first and second editions of his works. This title adds to the existing strength of the Graves Collection in Special Collections.

___, Dear Robert, Dear Spike: the Graves-Milligan Correspondence. Stroud, Gloucestershire: A. Sutton, 1991. Special Collections PR6013 R35 Z5 A45 1991

A Trojan Ending

A Trojan Ending

Laura (Riding) Jackson (1901-1991) was an American writer who, according to biographer Richard Perceval Graves, played a crucial role in the development of Robert Graves’ thoughts, especially during the years when he created his classic The White Goddess. Indeed, at one stage Riding was Muse to Graves. While in London they started Seizin Press, a private press set up to publish their works. A Trojan Ending (1937) was Riding’s first novel and it retells in a very personal way, the story of the siege of Troy from the point of view of the Trojans and the Greek invaders. This is the Random House first edition which was also co-published by Constable and Seizin Press in England.

Laura Riding, A Trojan Ending. New York: Random House, 1937. Special Collections PS3519 A363 T76 1937

When collecting meets scholarship

The Anatomy of the Human Body. 6th edition

The Anatomy of the Human Body. 6th edition

William Bowyer (1663-1737) was apprenticed to the London printer Miles Flesher in 1679. After a fire destroyed his premises in White Friars, Bowyer relocated to Temple Lane in October 1713. His son, William Bowyer Jr, joined the printing business in June 1722. One very important aspect concerning the firm is the survival of their ledgers that detail the books printed during 1710 and 1777. Dunedin-based academic Keith Maslen, along with John Lancaster, diligently deciphered the Bowyer Ledgers (1991). Primary resources were vital for this undertaking, so Maslen collected a number of Bowyer printings. Cheselden’s The Anatomy of the Human Body was once in his library.

William Cheselden , The Anatomy of the Human Body. 6th edition. London: Printed by William Bowyer, 1741. de Beer Eb 1741 C

The Bowyer Ledgers

The Bowyer Ledgers

Maslen and Lancaster’s The Bowyer Ledgers offers a vast amount of information to researchers on book production and book distribution in 18th century London. More than 5,000 works by some 1,000 authors were commissioned by some 500 customers, including booksellers, institutions and private gentlemen. Copies were delivered to more than 1,500 people, members of the trade or representatives of the reading public at large. The ledgers record what happened to the text as it moved through the printing house, noting paper, types, format, corrections, number printed and the like. The bibliographical details for Cheselden’s The Anatomy of the Human Body (1741) are registered at entry no. 2914.

Keith Maslen and John Lancaster, editors, The Bowyer Ledgers. The Printing Accounts of William Bowyer, Father and Son. London: The Bibliographical Society; New York: The Bibliographical Society of America, 1991. Special Collections Z232 B79 BS59

The History of Sir Charles Grandison. 2nd edition

The History of Sir Charles Grandison. 2nd edition

Samuel Richardson (1689-1761) was an 18th century writer best known for his epistolary novels Pamela (1740), Clarissa (1748), and The History of Sir Charles Grandison (1753). Richardson was also a printer. With meticulous detective work on some 500 ornaments, Keith Maslen was able to identify titles printed by Richardson, which numbered some 2300 individual works. Maslen’s Samuel Richardson of London Printer: A Study of his Printing based on Ornament Use and Business Accounts was published in 2001. This copy of Sir Charles Grandison – printed by Richardson – was part of a large 18th century collection owned by Maslen that was eventually acquired by Special Collections.

Samuel Richardson, The History of Sir Charles Grandison. 2nd edition. London: Printed for S. Richardson, and sold by C. Hitch and L. Hawes [and 5 others], 1754. de Beer Eb 1754 R

The French

Candide

Candide

Voltaire’s satirical novel, Candide, was first published in 1759 when he was 65 years old. Upon publication it caused widespread scandal and was subsequently banned. The introduction to this Nonesuch Press edition by French author Paul Morand (1888-1976) describes Voltaire’s Candide as ‘a sequence of burlesque, breath-taking catastrophes’. Richard Aldington (1892-1962) supplied the translation for this edition and the French artist, Sylvain Sauvage (1888-1948) produced the colourful illustrations. The volume not only complements our French holdings in Special Collections, but also our private press items.

François-Marie Arouet de Voltaire, Candide. London: Nonesuch Press, 1939. Special Collections PQ2082 C3 E5 1939

Britannicus: Tragedie

Britannicus: Tragedie

This ‘pint-sized’ 17th century Racine volume was purchased locally, from retired French and Art History lecturer, Dr Roger Collins. Pierre Corneille (1606-84) and Jean Racine (1639-1699) were two of the most popular and successful authors of their time and both writers drew heavily on ancient Greek and Roman history and literature for their works of tragedy and comedy. Special Collections has almost one hundred works by or concerning Corneille and Racine.

Jean Racine, Britannicus: Tragedie. [Paris], [1680?]. de Beer Fb 1680 R

Le Menteur: Comedie

Le Menteur: Comedie

This ‘pint-sized’ 17th century Corneille volume was purchased locally, from retired French and Art History lecturer, Dr Roger Collins. Pierre Corneille (1606-84) and Jean Racine (1639-1699) were two of the most popular and successful authors of their time and both writers drew heavily on ancient Greek and Roman history and literature for their works of tragedy and comedy. Special Collections has almost one hundred works by or concerning Corneille and Racine.

Pierre Corneille , Le Menteur: Comedie. [Paris: Abraham Wolfgang?], [1663]. de Beer Fa 1663 C

Salambo

Salambo

Described in his Correspondance as ‘un travail archéologique’, Gustave Flaubert’s Salambo is an historical novel. Flaubert (1821- 1880) relied heavily on Polybius’s Histories (2nd cent. BC) and his visits to Carthage, in modern-day Tunisia, as sources for this work set in Carthage, after the First Punic War (3rd cent. BC). Named for the female character, Salambo, priestess and daughter of the Carthaginian general, Hamilcar, this novel has been described as ‘exotic’ and ‘decadent’ and is highly descriptive. This Golden Cockerel edition contains attractive wood engravings by the Irish artist and author Robert Gibbings (1889-1958).

Gustave Flaubert, Salambo. Waltham Saint Lawrence, Berkshire: Golden Cockerel Press, [1931]. Special Collections PQ2246 S3 E5 1931

Gardening

Of Gardens

Of Gardens

‘God Almighty first planted a garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures’. This is the much-quoted first line from Sir Francis Bacon’s essay Of Gardens, first published in 1625. Of Gardens, essay 46 in a series of 58, was meant to be read in conjunction with essay 45, Of Buildings, in which Bacon (1561-1626) describes the ideal position and lay-out of a palace. He advises a garden should be no less than 30 acres and should be divided into three areas: the green area or lawn, the main garden, and ‘a heath or desert’. This edition was printed by Simon Lawrence, owner-operator of Fleece Press, Yorkshire. The engravings are by English artist Betty Pennell.

Francis Bacon, Of Gardens. Netherton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire: Fleece Press, 1993. Special Collections SB455.3 B317 1993

A New Orchard and Garden

A New Orchard and Garden

English gardener and historian, Eleanour Sinclair Rohde (1885-1950) describes William Lawson’s A New Orchard and Garden as a classic of ‘English garden literature’. Lawson’s treatise advises on all facets of orchard development, care and management, with especial reference to his own experience gardening in the north of England. Lawson (c. 1553-1635), a Protestant priest, who lived in Yorkshire, also wrote The Country House-Wife’s Garden (published with New Orchard and Garden in 1618) – a gardening volume exclusively for women. This Cresset Press edition is copy 56 of 650.

William Lawson, A New Orchard and Garden. London: Cresset Press Limited, 1927. Special Collections SB97 LD52 1927

The Eighteenth Century

Evelina, or, The History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World

Evelina, or, The History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World

In 1958, Esmond de Beer purchased a large collection of 18th century verse from Iolo Williams and gave it to Special Collections. This helped forge a strong base for teaching and research in 18th century literature in the English Department. Eighteenth century prose has also been sort after, particularly by women writers such as Fanny Burney. Although not the first edition of 1778, this anonymous ‘new edition’ of Fanny Burney’s Evelina (1784) was a significant purchase. Evelina was Burney’s first novel, for which she received 20 guineas from Lowndes the publisher. It was a critical success when it first appeared.

Fanny Burney, Evelina, or, The History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World. London: Printed for T. and W. Lowndes, 1784. de Beer Eb 1784 B

The Tatler, No. 203<br />

The Tatler, No. 203

Various reprints of The Spectator and The Tatler are housed in Special Collections, but until quite recently no original issues were present. Through the kindness of the University of the Third Age (U3A) this original Tatler – and other single leaf issues of The Spectator – were purchased to support teaching and learning in the English Department.

[Isaac Bickerstaff], The Tatler, No. 203
. ___, 25-27 July 1710. de Beer Ec 1709 T

The Whole Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner

The Whole Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner

Lucky happenstance had John Walter (1739-1812), a coal merchant, an underwriter for Lloyds of London, and bankrupt, purchasing the patent for ‘logography’ from one Henry Johnson. Logography was a new form of type-setting that was supposedly faster and more accurate than conventional type-setting because it allowed more than one letter – sometimes whole words and short phrases – to be set at a time. By May 1784 Walter was in business, printing some 40 titles by this process, including this edition of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1785). Logography was not a success. The exercise did, however, lead him to establish The Daily Universal Register, which was re-launched on 1 January 1788 as The Times. This Crusoe volume (one of two) is not only a fine example of an innovative printing process, but it adds greatly to the 18th century materials already in Special Collections.

Daniel Defoe, The Whole Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner. London: Printed at the Logographic Press, and sold by J. Walter, Printing-House Square, Black-Friars, 1785. de Beer Eb 1785 D

The Nineteenth Century

English Bards, and Scotch Reviewers: a Satire. 3rd edition

English Bards, and Scotch Reviewers: a Satire. 3rd edition

Special Collections is not strong in its holdings of 19th century literature; that period not being the focus of collecting by Esmond de Beer (mainly 17 and 18th centuries) or Charles Brasch (mainly 20th century Moderns). It is important to boost our holdings, and so when an important or seminal work is advertised through a catalogue or a dedicated book-site (abebooks.com; bookfinder.com), every attempt is made to secure it. This most recent addition is the 3rd edition of Lord Byron’s first great success, a satire originally written in response to the scathing notice of his Hours of Idleness in the Edinburgh Review for January 1808. It was once owned by an Irishman called William La Touche.

Lord Byron, English Bards, and Scotch Reviewers: a Satire. 3rd edition. London: Printed for James Cawthorn, 1810. de Beer Eb 1810 B

Queen Mab

Queen Mab

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) is one of the most important English Romantic poets, perhaps best known for works such as Ozymandias, To a Skylark, and The Masque of Anarchy. Early editions of Shelley’s are not well represented at Otago. Perhaps this fine lyrical poet, who steadily gained fame after his death, was seen as too radical for students in the early days of the University? Queen Mab was his first major poem, first printed in 1813. Some copies remained unsold, while pirated editions were confiscated by the Society for the Prevention of Vice. Despite fear of prosecution, the bookseller Richard Carlile published this edition in 1822.

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Queen Mab. London: Printed and published by R. Carlile, 1822. Special Collections PR5417 A1 1822

Confessions of an English Opium-eater. 3rd edition

Confessions of an English Opium-eater. 3rd edition

Thomas de Quincey’s autobiographical account of his laudanum (opium mixed with alcohol) addiction was first published in serial form in the London Magazine during September and October 1821. It was published in book format the following year. His Confessions – dealing with the pleasures and pain of the drug – struck a chord with many 19th century readers and it won him enduring fame. In the 1850s he re-wrote this ‘record of a remarkable period in my life’, destroying the essence of the earlier versions. This is the 3rd edition of 1823, which does not suffer from the re-write.

Thomas de Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-eater. 3rd edition. London: Printed for Taylor and Hessey, 1823. Special Collections PR4534 C6 1823

The Devil’s Walk: a Poem

The Devil’s Walk: a Poem

In June 1794, Samuel Taylor Coleridge met Robert Southey and a fast friendship was formed. With a shared vision of pantisocracy (equal government by all), collaboration was in the air. They co-wrote a play called The Fall of Robespierre (1795), and dabbled in political propaganda, and lectures on politics and history. Although their relationship fell apart, they did reconcile some years later. One fruit of this renewed friendship was The Devil’s Walk: A Poem (1830), published under the guise of ‘Professor Porson’. An additional plus to this 1830s satire are the illustrations by Richard Cruikshank (1789-1856), caricaturist, portrait miniaturist, and brother of artist George Cruikshank.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey, The Devil’s Walk: a Poem. London: Marsh and Miller; Edinburgh: Constable and Co., 1830. de Beer Eb 1830 C

Illustrations

Southern Cross: a Novel of the South Seas told in Wood Engravings

Southern Cross: a Novel of the South Seas told in Wood Engravings

Southern Cross is a true graphic novel; all images and no text. Loosely based on the nuclear testing that took place on Bikini Atoll in the 1940s, the book was described by Rockwell Kent in the introduction as ‘a story of love and happiness culminating in immeasurable disaster’. It contains 118 images all printed from the original wood engravings by English-born Laurence Hyde (1914-87), who immigrated to Canada, aged 12. The multi-talented Hyde, a wood engraver, artist and film maker, designed postage stamps for Canada’s Postal Service. Southern Cross has a New Zealand connection; Hyde consulted Sir Peter Buck (Te Rangi Hiroa) on facts about Polynesia.

Laurence Hyde, Southern Cross: a Novel of the South Seas told in Wood Engravings. Los Angeles: Ward Ritchie Press, 1951. Special Collections NE1112 H92 A74 1951

Beowulf

Beowulf

The epic Scandinavian poem Beowulf is an exciting but somewhat violent tale of the warrior and hero of its title. The tale recounts how Beowulf defeats the monster Grendel and Grendel’s mother and how fifty years later he must take up his sword, Naegling, again to defend his people against a dragon. This Random House edition contains Rockwell Kent’s interpretation of Beowulf and his companion, Wiglaf, fighting the dragon. Kent (1882-1971) studied architecture at Colombia University and art at the New York School of Art. An early modernist, his work complements those held within Special Collections by British artists Robert Gibbings and Eric Gill, and Lynd Ward, another American artist.

___, Beowulf. New York: Random House, 1932. Special Collections PR1583 L466 1932

Private Press

Agnes Miller Parker, Wood-engraver and Book Illustrator, 1895-1980

Agnes Miller Parker, Wood-engraver and Book Illustrator, 1895-1980

Fleece Press owner Simon Lawrence began printing and publishing books in Yorkshire, England in 1980. Over the years he has printed about 80 separate titles, most handset in metal type with images supplied from engraved woodblocks. His private press business has been described as ‘the highest quality private publishing firm in the country’ (Spectator, 2009). This volume features the work of Scottish born artist and wood-engraver, Agnes Miller Parker (1895-1980). Her talent as a wood-engraver came to the fore in her mid-30s and she had a particular artistic affinity for animals. Exquisitely designed and printed, this Fleece Press volume is a wonderful example of one of the Special Collections private press holdings.

Ian Rogerson, Agnes Miller Parker, Wood-engraver and Book Illustrator, 1895-1980. Wakefield, West Yorkshire: Fleece Press, 1990. Special Collections NE1147.6 P37 RQ33

Dress: Being an Essay in Masculine Vanity and an Exposure of the UnChristian Apparel Favoured by Females

Dress: Being an Essay in Masculine Vanity and an Exposure of the UnChristian Apparel Favoured by Females

The year 1978 was a significant one for Iowa-born Neil Shaver: he began his printing career after taking a course at the University of Nebraska; he also issued his first Yellow Barn Press book. Over 27 years Shaver printed some 30 separate publications, including works illustrated by the New York wood engraver, John de Pol (1913-2004). The press closed in 2005. De Pol’s engraving of Eric Gill features on the frontispiece of this work. The Gill theme continues with Shaver’s use of Joanna and Perpetua, typefaces designed by Gill. Special Collections continues to add private press material to its already extensive holdings in this area.

Eric Gill, Dress: Being an Essay in Masculine Vanity and an Exposure of the UnChristian Apparel Favoured by Females. Council Bluffs, Iowa: The Yellow Barn Press , 1986. Special Collections BJ1697 GF47 1986

T. E. Lawrence and Siegfried Sassoon: A Friendship

T. E. Lawrence and Siegfried Sassoon: A Friendship

T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), or Lawrence of Arabia as he became known, and Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) met in 1918 and struck up a firm friendship which lasted until Lawrence’s untimely death in 1935. Dennis Silk, a teacher and international cricketer, met Sassoon at a Cambridge cricket ground in 1953 and the text of this edition comes from a speech given by Silk in 2007, which chronicled Lawrence and Sassoon’s close friendship. Dr Miles Wigfield, owner of the Reading Room Press (now in Quenington, Gloucestershire), commissioned Jim Westergard, an American-born artist living in Canada, to render the wood-engraving of Lawrence and Sassoon. It is thought to be the first published image of the pair together. This attractive volume is copy 53 of 120.

Dennis Silk , T. E. Lawrence and Siegfried Sassoon: A Friendship. Quenington, Gloucestershire: The Reading Room Press, 2010. Special Collections PR6023 A937 Z5 SK32

A Cry to Kerouac

A Cry to Kerouac

Auckland poet Brian Gregory’s A Cry to Kerouac was printed by Tara McLeod, owner-operator of Pear Tree Press, Auckland, and purchased in 2013.

Brian Gregory, A Cry to Kerouac. Auckland: Pear Tree Press, 2013. Special Collections PR9641 G74 C79 2013

Vathek

Vathek

William Beckford (1760-1844), novelist, art collector and politician, wrote his orientalist gothic tale, Vathek, in French in the 1780s. This Nonesuch Press edition appeared in 1929 with illustrations by the American Marion V. Dorn (1896-1964), who was a successful designer in London in the 1920s and 30s. She specialised in textile design; this edition of Vathek was her only foray into books. Nonesuch Press was founded in London in 1922 by Francis Meynell, who believed that good quality books could be designed and produced by commercial printers who were capable of producing fine quality printing. Meynell’s ‘farming out’ of his books meant they were cheaper and more accessible to the wider public. This copy was purchased by Special Collections in 2013.

William Beckford , Vathek. London: Nonesuch Press, 1929. Special Collections PR4091 V37 1929

Like a Tree: Poems

Like a Tree: Poems

This large landscape private press book, Like a Tree, is a rare book, printed in 1993 in a limited edition of only 8 copies. It was a collaborative affair, between Tara McLeod, owner-operator of Pear Tree Press; John Mitchell, artist, printmaker and papermaker; and Judith Haswell, a librarian at Auckland University. Haswell wrote the poem and supplied the yellow calico cover; Mitchell made the paper from composite materials including banana skins; and McLeod performed his usual magic on the printing and layout. The work was donated to Special Collections by Judith Haswell.

Judith Haswell, Like a Tree: Poems. Auckland: Pear Tree Press, 1993. Special Collections PR9641 H3757 L54

Like a Tree: Poems

Like a Tree: Poems

This large landscape private press book, Like a Tree, is a rare book, printed in 1993 in a limited edition of only 8 copies. It was a collaborative affair, between Tara McLeod, owner-operator of Pear Tree Press; John Mitchell, artist, printmaker and papermaker; and Judith Haswell, a librarian at Auckland University. Haswell wrote the poem and supplied the yellow calico cover; Mitchell made the paper from composite materials including banana skins; and McLeod performed his usual magic on the printing and layout. The work was donated to Special Collections by Judith Haswell.

Judith Haswell, Like a Tree: Poems. Auckland: Pear Tree Press, 1993. Special Collections PR9641 H3757 L54

Red Square: the Next Word

Red Square: the Next Word

Alan Loney (b. 1940) printed his first book in New Zealand in 1971. A poet, printer and publisher, Loney worked at the Holloway Press at the University of Auckland before moving to Melbourne at the end of the 1990s. Loney’s works are significant in the development of the private press scene in both Australia and New Zealand, and Special Collections makes every effort to collect all his publications. In 2008, he was Printer-in-Residence at Otakou Press, University of Otago, when he printed Ruth Dallas’s Open Sky. Through his Melbourne imprint, Electio Editions, he printed Red Square: the Next Word. It was purchased by Special Collections in 2013.

Alan Loney, Red Square: the Next Word. St Malvern East, Victoria, Australia: Electio Editions, 2012. Special Collections PR9641 L6 R43 2012

Science Fiction

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science

Founded in America in 1949, the Fantasy & Science Fiction (F&SF) magazine has been published either monthly or bi-monthly ever since. Notable contributors have included Isaac Asimov (1920-92), Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), Stephen King (b. 1947) and Ursula Le Guin (b. 1929). This is just one of the F&SF magazines from an extensive SF collection of magazines donated in 2013 by University of Otago alumnus, Trevor Agnew. The cover art is truly fantastic.

___, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science. New York: Mercury, January 1991. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections.

The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction

The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction

Founded in America in 1949, the Fantasy & Science Fiction (F&SF) magazine has been published either monthly or bi-monthly ever since. Notable contributors have included Isaac Asimov (1920-92), Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), Stephen King (b. 1947) and Ursula Le Guin (b. 1929). This is just one of the F&SF magazines from an extensive SF collection of magazines donated in 2013 by University of Otago alumnus, Trevor Agnew. The cover art is truly fantastic.

___, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. New York: Mercury, September 1970. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

Founded in America in 1949, the Fantasy & Science Fiction (F&SF) magazine has been published either monthly or bi-monthly ever since. Notable contributors have included Isaac Asimov (1920-92), Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), Stephen King (b. 1947) and Ursula Le Guin (b. 1929). This is just one of the F&SF magazines from an extensive SF collection of magazines donated in 2013 by University of Otago alumnus, Trevor Agnew. The cover art is truly fantastic.

___, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. New York: Spilogale, Inc. , August 2005. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

Founded in America in 1949, the Fantasy & Science Fiction (F&SF) magazine has been published either monthly or bi-monthly ever since. Notable contributors have included Isaac Asimov (1920-92), Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), Stephen King (b. 1947) and Ursula Le Guin (b. 1929). This is just one of the  F&SF magazines from an extensive SF collection of magazines donated in 2013 by University of Otago alumnus, Trevor Agnew. The cover art is truly fantastic.

___, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. New York: Mercury, December 1990. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

Founded in America in 1949, the Fantasy & Science Fiction (F&SF) magazine has been published either monthly or bi-monthly ever since. Notable contributors have included Isaac Asimov (1920-92), Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), Stephen King (b. 1947) and Ursula Le Guin (b. 1929). This is just one of the  F&SF magazines from an extensive SF collection of magazines donated in 2013 by University of Otago alumnus, Trevor Agnew. The cover art is truly fantastic.

___, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. New York: Mercury, May 1988. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

Looking Backward

Looking Backward

Fred Fastier (b. 1920), inaugural Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Otago, began collecting Science Fiction (SF) in the 1950s when he was based in New York. At the end of 2010, Fastier donated his collection of 1200 SF titles to Special Collections. Edward Bellamy‘s Looking Backward: 2000-1887 was first published in 1888. It became one of the most popular American novels of its time and had a huge influence on contemporary intelligentsia. This Limited Editions Club volume (1941) was purchased in 2013.

Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward. New York: Limited Editions Club, 1941. Special Collections PS1086 L6 1941

Looking Backward

Looking Backward

Fred Fastier (b. 1920), inaugural Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Otago, began collecting Science Fiction (SF) in the 1950s when he was based in New York. At the end of 2010, Fastier donated his collection of 1200 SF titles to Special Collections. Edward Bellamy‘s Looking Backward: 2000-1887 was first published in 1888. It became one of the most popular American novels of its time and had a huge influence on contemporary intelligentsia. This Lancer Books paperback edition (1968) comes from the Fastier SF collection.

Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward. New York: Lancer Books, 1968. Science Fiction PS1086 L6 1968

The Time Machine, and The Island of Doctor Moreau

The Time Machine, and The Island of Doctor Moreau

Although Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) also wrote in other genres such as history and politics, he is best known as a writer of Science Fiction (SF). In 2004, The Folio Society published three of his best known SF novels: The Time Machine (1895), The Invisible Man (1897) and War of the Worlds (1898). Started by Charles Ede in 1947, the Folio Society is known for producing attractively illustrated and bound editions of classic works, as these three adequately demonstrate. Through donations and purchases of Science Fiction material, Special Collections at Otago is fast becoming a major player in Science Fiction holdings in New Zealand.

H. G. Wells, The Time Machine, and The Island of Doctor Moreau. London: Folio Society, 2004. Special Collections PR5774 T5 2004

The War of the Worlds

The War of the Worlds

Although Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) also wrote in other genres such as history and politics, he is best known as a writer of Science Fiction (SF). In 2004, The Folio Society published three of his best known SF novels: The Time Machine (1895), The Invisible Man (1897) and War of the Worlds (1898). Started by Charles Ede in 1947, the Folio Society is known for producing attractively illustrated and bound editions of classic works, as these three adequately demonstrate. Through donations and purchases of Science Fiction material, Special Collections at Otago is fast becoming a major player in Science Fiction holdings in New Zealand.

H. G. Wells , The War of the Worlds. London: Folio Society, 2004. Special Collections PR5774 W3 2004

The Invisible Man: A Grotesque Romance

The Invisible Man: A Grotesque Romance

Although Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) also wrote in other genres such as history and politics, he is best known as a writer of Science Fiction (SF). In 2004, The Folio Society published three of his best known SF novels: The Time Machine (1895), The Invisible Man (1897) and War of the Worlds (1898). Started by Charles Ede in 1947, the Folio Society is known for producing attractively illustrated and bound editions of classic works, as these three adequately demonstrate. Through donations and purchases of Science Fiction material, Special Collections at Otago is fast becoming a major player in Science Fiction holdings in New Zealand.

H. G. Wells, The Invisible Man: A Grotesque Romance. London: Folio Society, 2004. Special Collections PR5774 I55 2004

Astounding Stories of Super-Science

Astounding Stories of Super-Science

There are now over 3500 Science Fiction (SF) items in Special Collections. This is just one of the hundreds of Astounding/Analog magazines that were donated by Rachel Salive, wife of the SF collector Hal Salive. Dr Salive was born in the United States and lived in Waikanae, near Wellington. During his career as a collector, he lectured on SF. Astounding Science Fiction was first published in January 1930 and later morphed into Analog. The issues donated extend from March 1930 to September 2012, and features stories by writers such as Robert A. Heinlein (1907-88), L. Ron Hubbard (1911-86), Harlan Ellison (b. 1934), and Harry Turtledove (b. 1949). They are proving to be a great and colourful resource.

___, Astounding Stories of Super-Science. New York: Clayton, March 1930. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

Astounding Science Fiction

Astounding Science Fiction

There are now over 3500 Science Fiction (SF) items in Special Collections. This is just one of the hundreds of Astounding/Analog magazines that were donated by Rachel Salive, wife of the SF collector Hal Salive. Dr Salive was born in the United States and lived in Waikanae, near Wellington. During his career as a collector, he lectured on SF. Astounding Science Fiction was first published in January 1930 and later morphed into Analog. The issues donated extend from March 1930 to September 2012, and feature stories by writers such as Robert A. Heinlein (1907-88), L. Ron Hubbard (1911-86), Harlan Ellison (b. 1934), and Harry Turtledove (b. 1949). They are proving to be a great and colourful resource.

___, Astounding Science Fiction. New York: Street and Smith, September 1949. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

Analog: Science Fact/Science Fiction

Analog: Science Fact/Science Fiction

There are now over 3500 Science Fiction (SF) items in Special Collections. This is just one of the hundreds of Astounding/Analog magazines that were donated by Rachel Salive, wife of the SF collector Hal Salive. Dr Salive was born in the United States and lived in Waikanae, near Wellington. During his career as a collector, he lectured on SF. Astounding Science Fiction was first published in January 1930 and later morphed into Analog. The issues donated extend from March 1930 to September 2012, and features stories by writers such as Robert A. Heinlein (1907-88), L. Ron Hubbard (1911-86), Harlan Ellison (b. 1934), and Harry Turtledove (b. 1949). They are proving to be a great and colourful resource.

___, Analog: Science Fact/Science Fiction. New York: Conde Nast Publications, November 1964. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

Analog: Science Fiction and Fact

Analog: Science Fiction and Fact

There are now over 3500 Science Fiction (SF) items in Special Collections. This is just one of the hundreds of Astounding/Analog magazines that were donated by Rachel Salive, wife of the SF collector Hal Salive. Dr Salive was born in the United States and lived in Waikanae, near Wellington. During his career as a collector, he lectured on SF. Astounding Science Fiction was first published in January 1930 and later morphed into Analog. The issues donated extend from March 1930 to September 2012, and features stories by writers such as Robert A. Heinlein (1907-88), L. Ron Hubbard (1911-86), Harlan Ellison (b. 1934), and Harry Turtledove (b. 1949). They are proving to be a great and colourful resource.

___, Analog: Science Fiction and Fact. Connecticut: Crosstown Publications, September 2012. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

Analog: Science Fiction/Science Fact

Analog: Science Fiction/Science Fact

There are now over 3500 Science Fiction (SF) items in Special Collections. This is just one of the hundreds of Astounding/Analog magazines that were donated by Rachel Salive, wife of the SF collector Hal Salive. Dr Salive was born in the United States and lived in Waikanae, near Wellington. During his career as a collector, he lectured on SF. Astounding Science Fiction was first published in January 1930 and later morphed into Analog. The issues donated extend from March 1930 to September 2012, and features stories by writers such as Robert A. Heinlein (1907-88), L. Ron Hubbard (1911-86), Harlan Ellison (b. 1934), and Harry Turtledove (b. 1949). They are proving to be a great and colourful resource.

___, Analog: Science Fiction/Science Fact. New York: Davis Publications, July 1991. Fastier-Salive Sci Fi Collection, Special Collections

Walls

The Hereford World Map: Mappa Mundi

The Hereford World Map: Mappa Mundi

Purchased in 2010, with help from the University of the Third Age, this Hereford World Map facsimile is an important addition to Special Collections holdings. The only surviving large medieval map of the world, the original, dating from the end of the 13th century, is housed in the library of Hereford Cathedral, England. The colours of the facsimile have been restored to what the original colours would have been – for example – green for the seas and blue for the rivers. Unusually for the time, the name of the map-maker appears in the bottom left hand corner – Richard of Holdingham or Sleaford. Also the continents, Europe and Africa have been mixed up.

___, The Hereford World Map: Mappa Mundi. London: Folio Society, 2010. Special Collections GA304 R4 HH66

De humani corporis fabrica

De humani corporis fabrica

This image is from a 16th century printing of Andreas Vesalius’s (1514-1564) De humani corporis fabrica (‘On the structure of the human body’), which is part of the Monro Collection transferred from the Medical Library to Special Collections in 2013. Vesalius taught at Padua University in Northern Italy where he instructed in anatomy and surgery and dissected corpses during classes for the increased benefit of his students learning. His influential anatomical treatise was highly regarded for the meticulous attention to detail in its engravings and it contained the first published true to life depictions of the complex anatomical structure of the human body. It is a very impressive work.

Andreas Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica. [Basel: Joannis Oporini], [1555]. Monro Collection M306

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. ‘Samarang’

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. ‘Samarang’

This wonderful image of an Ourang Outan or Pongo is from a volume in the Scientific Expedition Reports transferred to Special Collections from the Science Library in 2013. HMS Samarang left England in February 1843 to make a ‘survey of the various coasts and islands in the Eastern Seas’ (Arthur Adams, preface to Zoology of the Voyage of HMS Samarang). The expedition party travelled to Borneo, Brunei, Hong Kong, Singapore, Manila, Japan, Mauritius and many places in between. Published in 1850, this volume contains many beautiful coloured plates of the animals observed in these spots.

John Edward Gray, et al, The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. ‘Samarang’. London: Reeve and Benham, 1850. Expeditions (Special Collections) Q115 S238 1843

Time to Teleport

Time to Teleport

Gordon R. Dickson’s Time to Teleport is just one of his stories in this Ace Double Novel Book from the Salive Science Fiction (SF) collection. Ace Books was founded by Aaron A. Wyn in 1952 and although he initially concentrated on westerns and gangster thrillers, Wyn realised the potential in SF. In their now famous tête-bêche (French, ‘head-to-toe’) format, the titles were marketed as ‘two for one’ and priced at 35 cents. Almost any SF writer of worth appeared in the Ace Double Novel Book series: A. E van Vogt (1912-2000); Robert E. Howard (1906-36), creator of Conan the Barbarian; Marion Zimmer Bradley (1930-99); and Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929) among others.

Gordon R. Dickson, Time to Teleport. New York: Ace Books, 1960. Salive Science Fiction Collection (Special Collections)

Astounding Stories

Astounding Stories

The cover art of this October 1931 issue of the Astounding Stories science fiction (SF) magazine was executed by Hans Waldemar Wessolowski (c. 1894-1948), better known as Wesso. Born in Prussia, now Germany, Wesso ‘jumped ship’ to the States in about 1914. He executed some 41 covers for Astounding Stories between 1930 and 1939. This issue is from the Salive SF collection.

___, Astounding Stories. New York: Clayton , October, 1931. Salive Science Fiction Collection (Special Collections)

Astounding Stories

Astounding Stories

Howard V. Brown (1878-1945) studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and became a prolific producer of Science Fiction (SF) art from the 1930s. This cover was Brown’s second for Astounding Stories magazine. This magazine is from the Salive SF collection.

___, Astounding Stories. New York: Street and Smith, November, 1933. Salive Science Fiction Collection (Special Collections)

Another Country

Another Country

The blurb of this 1963 edition of James Baldwin’s Another Country (1962) describes the novel ‘as born out of intense fury, rage and, above all, compassion’. Baldwin (1924-87), an African American writer brought up in Harlem, New York, often addressed the complex social issues of race and sexuality in his writing. Written at a time of great social turmoil in the United States, this controversial novel was a best seller. It tells the tale of a group of people living in Greenwich Village and explores the relationships ‘between black and white, between man and woman, [and] between man and man’. This book was purchased in 2010.

James Baldwin, Another Country. London: The Book Club, 1963. Special Collections PS3552 A45 A66 1963

A Book of Hours

A Book of Hours

Donald Culross Peattie’s, A Book of Hours, contains 24 essays, each describing one hour of a day. Educated at Harvard, Peattie (1898-1964) was one of the most prominent nature writers of his time. Each essay in this 1937 publication is accompanied by an image by the American wood engraver and artist, Lynd Ward (1905-85). Purchased in 2012 this volume adds to our collection of works by Ward.

Donald Culross Peattie, A Book of Hours. New York: G P Putnam, 1937. Special Collections PS3531 E254 B66

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