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Otago Medical School staff profiles

Dr Emily Macleod

PositionLecturer
DepartmentDepartment of Psychological Medicine (DSM)
QualificationsBA(Hons) PhD PGDipClPs
Research summaryDevelopmental and clinical psychology
ClinicalAssessment and treatment of hyperactive and inattentive children

Research

  • Psychological assessment interviews with children
  • The use of drawing with children and adolescents in clinically- and forensically-relevant settings
  • Ostracism in social networks
  • Adolescent suicide prevention in schools

Publications

Macleod, E., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2016). Drawing conclusions: The effect of instructions on children's confabulation and fantasy errors. Memory, 24(1), 21-31. doi: 10.1080/09658211.2014.982656

Macleod, E., Nada-Raja, S., Beautrais, A., Shave, R., & Jordan, V. (2015). Primary prevention of suicide and suicidal behaviour for adolescents in school settings (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 12, CD007322. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007322.pub2

Woolford, J., Patterson, T., Macleod, E., Hobbs, L., & Hayne, H. (2015). Drawing helps children to talk about their presenting problems during a mental health assessment. Clinical Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 20(1), 68-83. doi: 10.1177/1359104513496261

Macleod, E., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2013). The clinical and forensic value of information that children report while drawing. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 27, 564-573. doi: 10.1002/acp.2936

Crawford, E., Gross, J., Patterson, T., & Hayne, H. (2012). Does children’s colour use reflect the emotional content of their drawings? Infant & Child Development, 21(2), 198-215. doi: 10.1002/icd.742

Journal - Research Article

Macleod, E., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2016). Drawing conclusions: The effect of instructions on children's confabulation and fantasy errors. Memory, 24(1), 21-31. doi: 10.1080/09658211.2014.982656

Woolford, J., Patterson, T., Macleod, E., Hobbs, L., & Hayne, H. (2015). Drawing helps children to talk about their presenting problems during a mental health assessment. Clinical Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 20(1), 68-83. doi: 10.1177/1359104513496261

Macleod, E., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2013). The clinical and forensic value of information that children report while drawing. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 27, 564-573. doi: 10.1002/acp.2936

Crawford, E., Gross, J., Patterson, T., & Hayne, H. (2012). Does children’s colour use reflect the emotional content of their drawings? Infant & Child Development, 21(2), 198-215. doi: 10.1002/icd.742

Crawford, E., Gross, J., Brown, D., & Hayne, H. (2011). Does drawing aid communication with adolescents in interviews. Journal of the New Zealand College of Clinical Psychologists, 21(2), 24-25.

Strange, D., Hoynck Van Papendrecht, H., Crawford, E., Candel, I., & Hayne, H. (2010). Size doesn't matter: Emotional content does not determine the size of objects in children's drawings. Psychology, Crime & Law, 16(6), 459-476. doi: 10.1080/10683160902862213

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Journal - Research Other

Macleod, E., Nada-Raja, S., Beautrais, A., Shave, R., & Jordan, V. (2015). Primary prevention of suicide and suicidal behaviour for adolescents in school settings (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 12, CD007322. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007322.pub2

More publications...