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Development and application of the Pacific Identity and Wellbeing Scale: A culturally-appropriate self-report measure for Pacific peoples in New Zealand

About Dr Sam Manuelam, School of Psychology, University of Auckland

Dr Sam Manuela is an early career researcher based in the School of Psychology at The University of Auckland. Sam’s research interests focus primarily on the relationships between ethnic identity, health and wellbeing for Pacific peoples in New Zealand. Sam’s background is in scale development where he developed the Pacific Identity and Wellbeing Scale – a tool that blends psychological and Pacific research for a psychometric tool that is centred on Pacific concepts of the self. Sam’s other research interests include mental health literacy, stigma, discrimination, and Indigenous Psychologies.

About the talk

Pacific peoples are a diverse, growing and vibrant collection of communities throughout New Zealand. Psychological research with Pacific peoples is growing, and a key factor for the growth and success of research is by utilising our indigenous Pacific epistemologies within psychology. In this talk, I will present research on the development and application of the Pacific Identity and Wellbeing Scale (Manuela & Sibley, 2015), a unique psychometric tool grounded on Pacific cultural values. Further to this, I will discuss ideas on a framework for approaching psychological research with Pacific peoples that draws upon multiple knowledges and methodologies to best suit the needs of Pacific communities.

Date Monday, 20 May 2019
Time 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Audience Public
Event Category Sciences
Event Type Seminar
CampusDunedin
DepartmentPsychology
LocationWilliam James Seminar Room 103, William James Building, 275 Leith Walk, Otago Campus
CostFree
Contact NameJoanna Ling
Contact Phone03 479 7631
Contact Emailpsychology@otago.ac.nz
Websitehttp://www.otago.ac.nz/psychology

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