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Flow cytometry applications in research

Flow cytometry contributes to many research publications and presentations. Sometimes the contribution is small and at other times it is a major factor in the success of the investigation. In many cases the expertise of our staff are called upon and we thank those authors who have acknowledged this contribution.

The projects below are a selection of health research projects using our FACSAria Fusion equipment as part of their investigations.

We welcome hearing from you about your projects and publications, and are happy to add your publication reference to our website.
Email michelle.wilson@otago.ac.nz

Acknowledgment format

If you wish to acknowledge OMNI in your publications, we recommend using the following statement:

The authors acknowledge the facilities, and scientific and technical assistance from flow cytometry staff, at Otago Micro and Nanoscale Imaging (OMNI), at the University of Otago.

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Flow cytometry in health research

Batten disease

Professor Ruth Empson and Associate Professor Stephanie Hughes will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort rare neuronal cell populations for analysis and manipulation.

Cancer

Researchers will use the FACSAria Fusion to measure: cancer drug efficacy, study the role of genetically engineered T cells (CAR T cells) to treat cancer, sort immune cells in the skin involved in fighting melanoma and cervical cancer, to develop new therapies for breast and prostate cancers, to sort B cells from cord blood to determine if these develop into acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and to sort tumour-infiltrating cells to determine the mechanisms of immune protection against colorectal cancer.

Diabetes

Dr Tim Hore will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort naïve embryonic stem cells to measure their regenerative properties.

Heart disease

Dr Tim Hore will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort naïve embryonic stem cells to measure their regenerative properties.

Infectious diseases

Researchers will use the FACSAria Fusion: to sort specific immune cell subsets to measure protection against tuberculosis, pneumonia and multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae, to develop methodology to sort mutants of bacteria that cause nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections, and to understand the disease process of the malaria merozoite.

Inflammatory bowel disease

Associate Professor Grant Butt will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort intestinal stem cells as they mature and differentiate to understand the factors influencing the development of inflammatory bowel disease.

Motor Neuron Disease

Professor Ruth Empson and Associate Professor Stephanie Hughes will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort rare neuronal cell populations for analysis and manipulation.

Neurological degeneration

Dr Tim Hore will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort naïve embryonic steam cells to measure their regenerative properties.

Stroke

Professor Ruth Empson and Associate Professor Stephanie Hughes will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort fluorescent-tagged pericytes for grafting into the stroke-lesioned brain.

Thrombocytopenia (low platelets)

Associate Professor Liz Ledgerwood will use the FACSAria Fusion to sort primary cells from people affected by thrombocytopenia.

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