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Gerard Farrell

Thesis title

Manual Therapy treatment directed at the cervical spine in individuals with post-concussion syndrome

Area of study

  • Mechanisms of manual therapy
  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Neuroendocrine system
  • Post-concussion syndrome
  • Autonomic dysfunction

Supervisors

  • Associate Professor Steve Tumilty, School of Physiotherapy, Health Sciences, University of Otago
  • Dr. Cathy Chapple, Stanley Paris Research Fellow, School of Physiotherapy, Health Sciences, University of Otago

Education background

  • 2013: Bachelor of Physiotherapy, University of Otago
  • 2016: Post Graduate Certificate in Physiotherapy endorsed in Sports Physiotherapy, University of Otago
  • 2017: Post Graduate Diploma in Physiotherapy endorsed in Sports Physiotherapy, University of Otago
  • 2018: Master of Physiotherapy endorsed in Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapy, University of Otago

Publications

Farrell G, Watson L, & Devan H. (2019) Current evidence for nonpharmacological interventions and criteria for surgical management of persistent acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis: a systematic review. Shoulder Elbow. 2019. doi:10.1177/1758573219840673

Presentations

Farrell G, Watson L, & Devan H. Current evidence for nonpharmacological interventions and criteria for surgical management of persistent acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis: a systematic review. Australian Physiotherapy Association Transform Physiotherapy Conference, held at: Adelaide, Australia.

Awards

  • Mark Steptoe Memorial Prize, University of Otago, 2017
  • University of Otago Doctoral Scholarship 2020-2023
  • Stanley Paris PhD Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapy Scholarship 2020-2023

Why did you choose Otago?

The knowledge surrounding the neurophysiological effects of manual therapy taught to me by Associate Professor Steve Tumilty in the second year of my masters, on top of clinical experience of neurophysiological effects occurring in individuals with post-concussion syndrome treated with manual therapy, got me interested in this topic. I then approached Steve in early 2019 regarding starting a PhD. Steve explored funding opportunities that would suit my situation and urged me to apply.

I was fortunate enough to be successful in receiving a University of Otago Doctoral scholarship and the Stanley Paris PhD OMT scholarship. At the same time the School of Physiotherapy clinics were looking for clinicians and my wife found a position there. All in all with the combination of scholarships and work opportunities, we are fortunate for me to be able to complete my PhD studies and maintain a level of income to support our family.

The other reason that we chose Otago University is that my wife, Nicole, likes Dunedin.

Best things about study?

What I enjoy most about study is acquiring new knowledge and applying it to the clinical setting. I am inherently inquisitive and study for fun anyway. The best thing about study in this instance is that I am now getting paid to do something I love and would do anyway.