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Human body's response to neck treatment following concussion

Neck health male imageMoving the joints in your neck is a common, and effective, treatment for concussion symptoms. However, the reason for its positive effect is not fully understood. The 'Human response to neck treatment following concussion' study will help answer this question.

Therefore, the goal of this study to determine whether a different response happens after moving the joints at the top or bottom of the neck in people with persistent concussion symptoms.

Seeking:

Males (21–35 years) who own an iPhone (required for one of the measurements) with concussion symptoms of more than 14 days (headache, dizziness, fatigue, etc) are invited to participate in a research study to determine whether a different response happens after moving the joints at the top or bottom of the neck.

To participate, you will be required to:

1. Take some baseline, and after treatment, saliva samples and measurements through an iPhone application (Camera HRV iPhone application will be provided to you at no cost).

You will also be required to attend:

1. A 30-minute introductory session at the School of Physiotherapy where you will learn about the study, be asked some questions to make sure you are safe to participate, and be taught how to use the required measurement tools.

2. A one-hour treatment session at the School of Physiotherapy where an experienced physiotherapist will gently push on the upper or lower part of your neck and measure your response.

To recognise the actual or reasonable costs involved with participating in this project, all participants will be reimbursed with a $20 petrol voucher for completing all measurements and attending all sessions.

Learn more about the study:

Contact

To register your interest please contact: ('neck study')
Tel +64 27 728 3013
Email gerard.farrell@otago.ac.nz

This project has been reviewed and approved by the Health and Disability Ethics Committee (Health). Reference: 2022 EXP 12201