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Associate Professor Liana Machado Research Interests

 Dr Liana Machado

Tel 64 3 479 7622
Email liana@psy.otago.ac.nz
Visit Associate Professor Machado's profile

Strategic Control Over Eye Movement Reflexes and Attention

My laboratory researches the mechanisms and machinery underlying healthy brain functions and the cognitive deficits that emerge as a result of brain disease and advanced aging.

Understanding Brain Function and Dysfunction

To this end, we study patients suffering from neurological conditions (such as stroke and Parkinson’s disease), as well as neurologically-healthy young and aging adults. We then combine the knowledge gained from each of these groups so that we can advance the current understanding of brain function and brain dysfunction.

Visual Orienting

My main interest is in visual orienting, including attention and eye movements, with a particular focus on how more advanced brain structures orchestrate the activities of more primitive brain structures in order to generate strategic behaviours.

Publications

Machado, L., Guiney, H., & Struthers, P. (2012). Identity-based inhibitory processing during focused attention. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. doi:10.1080/17470218.2012.701651

Wyatt, N., & Machado, L. (2012). Distractor inhibition: Principles of operation during selective attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. doi: 10.1037/a0027922

Machado, L., Devine, A., & Wyatt, N. (2009). Distractibility with advancing age and Parkinson's disease. Neuropsychologia, 47(7), 1756-1764.

van Koningsbruggen, M. G., Pender, T., Machado, L., & Rafal, R. D. (2009). Impaired control of the oculomotor reflexes in Parkinson's disease. Neuropsychologia, 47(13), 2909-2915.

Arend, I., Machado, L., Ward, R., McGrath, M., Ro, T., & Rafal, R. D. (2008). The role of the human pulvinar in visual attention and action:evidence from temporal order judgments, saccade decision, andantisaccade tasks. Progress in Brain Research, 171, 475-483

Machado, L., Wyatt, N., Devine, A., & Knight, B. (2007). Action planning in the presence of distracting stimuli: an investigation into the time course of distractor effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 33(5), 1045-1061.

Mari-Beffa, P., Hayes, A. E., Machado, L., & Hindle, J. V. (2005). Lack of inhibition in Parkinson's disease: evidence from a lexical decision task. Neuropsychologia, 43(4), 638-646.

Machado, L., & Rafal, R. D. (2004). Inhibition of return generated by voluntary saccades is independent of attentional momentum. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 57A(5), 789-796.

Machado, L., & Rafal, R. D. (2004). Control of fixation and saccades during an anti-saccade task: an investigation in humans with chronic lesions of oculomotor cortex. Experimental Brain Research, 156(1), 55-63.

Rafal, R., McGrath, M., Machado, L., & Hindle, J. (2004). Effects of lesions of the human posterior thalamus on ocular fixation during voluntary and visually triggered saccades. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, 75(11), 1602-1606.

Machado, L., & Rafal, R. D. (2004). Control of fixation and saccades in humans with chronic lesions of oculomotor cortex. Neuropsychology, 18(1), 115-123.

Rafal, R., McGrath, M., Machado, L., & Hindle, J. (2004). Effects of lesions of the human posterior thalamus on ocular fixation during voluntary and visually triggered saccades. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, 75(11), 1602-1606.

Müller, N. G., Machado, L., & Knight, R. T. (2002). Contributions of subregions of the prefrontal cortex to working memory: evidence from brain lesions in humans. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 14(5), 673-686.

Rafal, R., Danziger, S., Grossi, G., Machado, L., & Ward, R. (2002). Visual detection is gated by attending for action: evidence from hemispatial neglect. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U S A, 99(25), 16371-16375.

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