Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Otago researchers develop high definition tissue 3D printing resin

Wednesday 13 June 2018 2:50pm

Beau Jackson of 3D Printing Industry explains a University of Otago bioprinting study recently published in the Biofabrication journal.

The CReaTE research group and collaborators report an important breakthrough in their efforts to synthesise viable living tissue. They have developed a new bioprinting resin which eliminates cell-damaging ingredients used in other 3D printing resins. Dr Khoon Lim, the lead author, explains, “To make our resins ‘bio’, we employed a combination of macromers (photo-responsive PVA-MA and GelMA) and the photo-initiator ruthenium. All these components are water soluble and not cytotoxic to cells.”

The new material is also capable of printing 3D structures at a micro-scale unrivalled by other bioprinting techniques, according to lead researcher Tim Woodfield. This offers researchers opportunities to better mimic the micro-architecture of living tissues.

The recent study proved the printed light-cured resin is capable of forming bone and cartilage tissue containing cells that remained alive over a period of 21 days. The next phase of the study is to apply the material to 3D printed liver and cancer models for drug testing and further research.

Bioprinted hydrogel showing finely curved structures inspired by the tissue organisation of bio-photonics
Bioprinted hydrogel showing finely curved structures inspired by the tissue organisation of bio-photonics.

Read the full article on the 3D Printing Industry website
Read the paper in the Biofabrication journal