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Bioresin helps print biological tissue

Monday 11 June 2018 3:56pm

Physics World magazine summarises innovations in tissue construction recently published by the University of Otago’s CReaTE research group and its collaborators at the University Medical Centre Utrecht in the Netherlands.

Physics World’s Belle Dumé summarises innovations in tissue construction recently published by the University of Otago’s CReaTE research group and its collaborators at the University Medical Centre Utrecht in the Netherlands.

3D printing using digital-light processing (DLP) offers an attractive alternative to extrusion bioprinting. It can create more intricate printed patterns, better mimicking complex biological tissue architecture, whilst still making use of commercial printing machines.

A new bioresin developed by the team allows DLP to be used to bioprint sophisticated cell-laden hydrogel structures with high-resolution features ranging in size from 25 to 50 micron. High cell viability has been achieved in the printed resin-structures without the problem of cell settling.

A 3D-printed hydrogel fashioned in a woven-mat structure for use in tissue engineering
A 3D-printed hydrogel fashioned in a woven-mat structure for use in tissue engineering.

Read the full article on the Physics World website
Read the paper in the Biofabrication journal