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2015 Science Wānanga

July 2015, Maungatapu Marae, Tauranga

In July 2015 Science Wānanga delivered a Wānanga to year 9-11 students at Maungatapu Marae, Tauranga. The Wānanga focussed on water chemistry, resource management, and hauora māori.

Water is an important resource and traditional focal point for Māori communities. In the modern world it is under threat from a variety of activities. To preserve natural waterways for future generations it is important to monitor their condition so problems can be identified early and dealt with. This chemistry project will involve looking at some of the key things that can be monitored in water and testing for them in local waterways.

Pressures on the land and sea need to be managed to support existing environmental, cultural and economic values. In this resource management theme we will explore the effects of harbour activities and adjacent land use practices on coastal ecosystems and cultural values. Measurement techniques, mapping, position fixing, and data gathering all contribute to Geographic Information Systems which inform resource management decisions.

The heart and the brain are two of the most well-known and interesting organs in the body. The heart is the driving force behind keeping the body well perfused, while the brain is the chief: it makes all of the decisions. Unfortunately, things can go wrong with these organs so it is important we know how to monitor them. The hauora māori theme will involve workshops where we investigate some classical examination techniques for assessing the heart and brain.

The Wānanga attendees included:

  • 37 year 10-11 students
  • 7 teachers
  • 8 postgraduate students and academics

The Wānanga was delivered in collaboration with Te Rūnanga o Ngai te Rangi Maungatapu Marae.

August 2015, Houngarea Marae, Hastings

August saw the Science Wānanga team travel to Houngarea Marae, Hastings to deliver a Wānanga to year 8-10 students. The Wānanga had three themes: wetlands restoration, chemistry, and conservation of flora & fauna.

The chemistry theme involved extracting dye and medicines from native plants, making ice cream using liquid nitrogen and also a chemistry "magic show" to demonstrate the power and properties of compounds and energy of elements.

Wetlands function to improve water quality, control floods, regulate global carbon levels and provide habitat for a diverse range of plants and animals. Unfortunately, many of our indigenous wetland species are threatened due to a decline in habitat and water quality in many of our rivers, streams and lakes. This wetland restoration wānanga looks at the importance of wetlands, what lives in them and why we need to restore them.

The Wānanga attendees included:

  • 45 year 8-10 students
  • 13 teachers
  • 8 postgraduate students and academics

The Wānanga was delivered in collaboration with Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga Houngarea Marae.

November 2015, Puketeraki Marae, Karitane

In November 2015 Science Wānanga delivered a Wānanga to year 10-11 students at Puketeraki Marae, Karitane. The Wānanga investigated biological soft and shore surveying, coastal water monitoring, navigation and water safety, and waka paddling/sailing. The Wānanga attendees included:

  • 37 year 10-11 students
  • 7 teachers
  • 13 postgraduate students and academics

The Wānanga was delivered in collaboration with Kati Huirapa Rūnaka ki Puketeraki and Puketeraki Marae.