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TOUR101 Introduction to Tourism

Description

An introduction to the global principles that structure tourism, the nature and operation of the tourist industry and the impact, development and management issues that arise from tourism.
Topics include: tourism, globalisation and mobility; international and New Zealand trends; motivations and desires to travel; the role of international organisations and government in tourism; tourism as an international business; economic, technological, social, cultural, environmental and political dimensions; tourism and security issues; tourism and global environmental change.

Time Commitment

6 hours per week independent reading
10 hours per week on module material
2 to 4 hours per week on Discussion Board using Blackboard
25 hours on each assessed report

Note: This is a distance course run through Blackboard. Students must have access to a computer and must contact the lecturer/course coordinator in the first week of the course so that communication paths can be initiated. This is crucial to the successful completion of the paper.

Lecturer and Course Coordinator

Dr Susan Houge Mackenzie

Textbook

Recommended: Weaver, D. & Lawton, L. (2009), Tourism Management (Edition 4). Wiley: Milton, Australia.

Collier, A. (2011) Principles of Tourism: A New Zealand Perspective (Edition 8). Pearson Education: Auckland.

Recommended for more advanced readings on tourism and contemporary mobility:

Cornelissen, S. (2005), The Global Tourism System, Ashgate, Aldershot. Hall, C.M. (2004) Tourism: Rethinking the Social Science of Mobility. Pearson: Harlow, UK.

Assessment

Essay30%
Short answer questions20%
Discussion board10%
Final examination (via Blackboard, open book)40%

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Details

An introduction to the global principles that structure tourism, the nature and operation of the tourist industry and the impact, development and management issues that arise from tourism.

The tourism and hospitality sectors represent one of the world's largest industries. In New Zealand tourism is a $20 billion industry that generates 9% of GDP. As a highly diverse and innovative industry, as well as a significant source of employment, it is critical that the industry is served by high-quality graduates. TOUR 101 serves as the platform for the undergraduate degree in tourism. It provides future leaders of the industry, including policy-makers and managers, with critical understandings of the principles that structure tourism and the nature and operation of tourism businesses in New Zealand and globally.

Paper title Introduction to Tourism
Paper code TOUR101
Subject Tourism
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points 18 points 18 points
Teaching period(s) Summer School, First Semester, Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $829.65
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,993.30

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Restriction
TOUX 101
Schedule C
Commerce
Contact
tourism@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Summer School: Dr Susan Houge Mackenzie
First Semester: Professor James Higham
Second Semester: Dr Julia Albrecht
Paper Structure
The structure of TOUR 101 is derived from tourism systems theory. As such, the paper is organised into three parts in which the generating, transit and destination regions are addressed in relation to
  • Tourism destinations management
  • Tourism as a business enterprise
  • The tourist experience
This structure reflects the progression that students make to the 200-level of study.
Teaching Arrangements
This paper is taught via Distance Learning during Summer School. All course information will be available on Blackboard.For First Semester and Second Semester there are two 50-minute lectures per week and one tutorial fortnightly.
Textbooks
Recommended:
Weaver, D. & Lawton, L. (2009), Tourism Management (Edition 4). Wiley: Milton, Australia.
Collier, A. (2011) Principles of Tourism: A New Zealand Perspective (Edition 8). Pearson Education: Auckland.

For more advanced readings on tourism and contemporary mobility we recommend:
Cornelissen, S. (2005), The Global Tourism System, Ashgate, Aldershot.
Hall, C.M. (2004) Tourism: Rethinking the Social Science of Mobility. Pearson: Harlow, UK.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Upon successfully completing the paper students will be able to
  • Identify and discuss the theories and principles that structure tourism phenomena
  • Discuss the nature and the operation of the tourism industry and tourism firms in different environments, but particularly within the New Zealand context
  • Discuss tourism impacts, management, development and planning in different environments in a New Zealand and international context
Course outline
This will be available on Blackboard at the start of the paper.

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Timetable

Summer School

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught through Distance Learning
Learning management system
Blackboard

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 15:00-15:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 16:00-16:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Tuesday 11:00-11:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
T2 Tuesday 13:00-13:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
T3 Tuesday 16:00-16:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
T4 Wednesday 11:00-11:50 10, 12, 15-16, 19, 21
T5 Friday 11:00-11:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Monday 12:00-12:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
T2 Monday 15:00-15:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
T3 Tuesday 11:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
T4 Wednesday 16:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40