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Recent PhD submissions at Surveying

Monday 24 February 2020 3:08pm

Surveying postgrads went along with James to submit his thesis image 2020
Surveying postgrads went along with James to submit his thesis (with supervisors Lyn Carter and David Goodwin).

Recently Surveying PhD candidates Todd Redpath and James Berghan both submitted their PhD manuscripts. It’s an exciting time as they now wait for feedback from their examiners.

Todd’s thesis A multi-scale approach to assessing the spatio-temporal variability of seasonal snow in the Clutha Catchment, New Zealand utilises remotely sensed data from satellite and drone to map seasonal snow and examine how it varies in time and space. Geospatial analysis allows variability in space and time to be characterised and quantified, revealing the importance of climate processes and topography in influencing seasonal snow processes at scales from metres to hundreds of kilometres. Given the historical lack of observations of seasonal snow in New Zealand, the remote sensing and geospatial techniques applied in this research provide new insights into our seasonal snow processes and guidance for modelling efforts. Todd was supervised by Dr Pascal Sirguey (Surveying), Assoc. Prof. Nicolas Cullen (Geography) and Prof. Sean Fitzsimons (Geography).

Todd and James at the Clocktower (preparing to ring the University bell) image 2020
Todd and James at the Clocktower (preparing to ring the University bell)

James’ thesis Ecology of community: Exploring principles of socially-based tenure in urban papakāinga and cohousing communities compares papakāinga (Māori villages) and cohousing developments through the eyes of their residents, to understand how each model succeeds in a contemporary urban setting. His findings culminated in a conceptual model, He rākai whai hua, as a means of understanding four key factors that enable socially-connected communities to flourish. James was supervised by Dr David Goodwin (Surveying) and Dr Lyn Carter (Te Tumu).

As part of the submission process Todd and James were given the traditional chocolate fish from the Graduate Research School and invited to ring the historic University bell located by the iconic Clocktower building – a tradition created in mid-2019.

Ka pai Todd and James!