Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Research projects

Te Hau Kāinga: Histories and Legacies of the Māori Home Front, 1939–45

Māori participation in World War II was significant. For Māori, their experience instigated significant social, economic and demographic transitions, and stimulated calls for equality of treatment in all areas of life in the post-war decades. Yet, the wartime experience is one of the least understood changes in Māori society. This project will provide the first sustained examination of the Māori home front from the perspectives of women, young people, whānau and communities who experienced the war at home, addressing how ordinary Māori mobilised for wartime economic needs, and made a distinctive contribution to post-war aspirations for political and economic self-determination.

Expected research output/s and timeframes

  • Conference: Pacific History Association, Suva, 2020
  • Book: a co-authored monograph by the lead investigators and postdoctoral fellow
  • Other: a symposium in 2021 on the indigenous home-front from an international perspective, to be attended by scholars from a range of countries (Australia, Pacific and North America). An edited collection is planned from this event
  • This research will fund up to five internships for Māori students to return to their own hau kāinga to undertake research on the impacts of the Second World War on their own

Collaborators

Lead Investigators: Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla (History, University of Otago) and Professor Lachy Paterson; Postdoctoral Fellow: Sarah Christie

Funding source

Marsden Fund/Te Pūtea Rangahau a Marsden (Social Sciences Panel) – $746,000

Researcher

Professor Lachy Paterson
Email lachy.paterson@otago.ac.nz
Also a member of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture

^ Top of page

Te Iwi Māori me te Pukapuka: Māori and the Book 

This project investigates Māori engagement with literacy and print, especially in the nineteenth century. While the acquisition of literacy is of course relevant, a more productive area of study is how Māori used these skills in their social, political and economic lives. Print was introduced as Māori were gaining their literacy skills. This project also investigates how various historical actors, including the state, churches and pan-Māori organisations, marshalled this new technology to promulgate their own discourses and advance their own agenda.

Expected research output/s and timeframes

  • Conference: New Zealand Studies Conference, Marseille, 2020
  • Book: a sole authored monograph, to be completed in 2021

Researcher

Professor Lachy Paterson
Email lachy.paterson@otago.ac.nz
Also a member of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture

^ Top of page

He Tuhinga nō Neherā: Texts, Contexts and Resonances

A number of New Zealand academics came together to discuss historical texts written by a Māori man, woman, or group during the colonial period. The focus was on the text, and historical context from which it was produced, but also how the text might resonate today, with whānau, hapū or iwi, with te iwi Māori, or with Aotearoa-New Zealand more generally. I am now collaborating with several Te Tumu colleagues to publish an edited collection of essays from this project.

Expected research output/s and timeframes

  • Book: a co-edited collection, to be completed in 2021

Collaborators

Dr Paerau Warbrick (Te Tumu) and Dr Megan Potiki (Te Tumu)

Funding source

Centre for Research on Colonial Culture – $8,000

Researcher

Professor Lachy Paterson
Email lachy.paterson@otago.ac.nz
Also a member of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture

^ Top of page

Indigenous Textual Cultures

A number of New Zealand and international academics came together to discuss aspects of text and print history relating to indigenous peoples, in Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific, Africa and North America, with particular regard to textual culture. I am now collaborating with several Otago colleagues to publish an edited collection of essays from this project.

Expected research output/s and timeframes

Book: a co-edited collection, to be completed in 2020.

Collaborators

Professor Tony Ballantyne (History, University of Otago) and Professor Angela Wanhalla (History, University of Otago)

Funding source

Centre for Research on Colonial Culture – $6,000

Researcher

Professor Lachy Paterson
Email lachy.paterson@otago.ac.nz
Also a member of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture