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HIST217 Russia: Reform to Revolution

Russia from the emancipation of the serfs in 1861 to the revolutions of 1917.

This paper examines the political events of the period - those who ruled and by what means their power was upheld and reproduced - but focuses equally on social history and the lives of workers, peasants, families, communities, ethnic groups, men and women. This dual approach leads to the consideration of the major issues arising in Russian history. To what extent was Russian society different from that of Western Europe? Was the development of capitalism and parliamentary democracy possible in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? Why did the revolutions occur?

Paper title Russia: Reform to Revolution
Paper code HIST217
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
One 100-level HIST paper or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
alexander.trapeznik@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Associate Professor Alexander Trapeznik
Textbooks
Recommended: Waldron, Peter, The End of Imperial Russia, 1855-1917, Macmillan, London, 1997.

In addition, course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Environmental literacy, Information literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
After completing the paper students should:
  • Understand the principal features of Russian history during this period through an examination of social classes, institutions and ideas
  • Understand why there were two revolutions in 1917 and the historical significance of the October 1917 Revolution

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 12:00-12:50 9-15, 18-22
Thursday 12:00-12:50 9-15, 17-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Monday 09:00-09:50 10, 12, 14, 18, 20
T2 Thursday 10:00-10:50 10, 12, 14, 18, 20

Russia from the emancipation of the serfs in 1861 to the revolutions of 1917.

This paper examines the political events of the period - those who ruled and by what means their power was upheld and reproduced - but focuses equally on social history and the lives of workers, peasants, families, communities, ethnic groups, men and women. This dual approach leads to the consideration of the major issues arising in Russian history. To what extent was Russian society different from that of Western Europe? Was the development of capitalism and parliamentary democracy possible in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? Why did the revolutions occur?

Paper title Russia: Reform to Revolution
Paper code HIST217
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One 100-level HIST paper or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
alexander.trapeznik@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Associate Professor Alexander Trapeznik
Textbooks
Recommended: Waldron, Peter, The End of Imperial Russia, 1855-1917, Macmillan, London, 1997.

In addition, course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Environmental literacy, Information literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
After completing the paper students should:
  • Understand the principal features of Russian history during this period through an examination of social classes, institutions and ideas
  • Understand why there were two revolutions in 1917 and the historical significance of the October 1917 Revolution

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard