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HIST225 Totalitarian Regimes: Europe 1922-1945

A comparative exploration of attempts to create totalitarian regimes between 1922 and 1945 in Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia, and elsewhere.

Between World War I and World War II, several major European nations, under the leadership of men such as Mussolini, Stalin and Hitler, shunned democracy to open new historic paths towards 'totalitarianism' - the ideal of state control over all aspects of citizens' lives. This paper examines the pre-history and history of the principal regimes that aspired to totalitarian rule, as well as historical interpretations of their emergence and demise.

Paper title Totalitarian Regimes: Europe 1922-1945
Paper code HIST225
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
One 100-level HIST paper or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
May not be credited together with HIST 231 passed in 2004.
Contact
mark.seymour@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Christopher Barber
Textbooks
Course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Appreciation of the intellectual currents and historical circumstances favouring totalitarian styles of rule
  • Understanding of the similarities and differences among historical attempts to create totalitarian regimes
  • An understanding of totalitarian regimes as political experiments
  • An appreciation of historical responses to systematic human atrocities
  • An understanding of the historical fragility of democracy.

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 15:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 15:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Monday 13:00-13:50 29-30, 32, 34, 37, 39
T2 Monday 14:00-14:50 29-30, 32, 34, 37, 39
T3 Tuesday 12:00-12:50 29-30, 32, 34, 37, 39
T4 Tuesday 13:00-13:50 29-30, 32, 34, 37, 39

A comparative exploration of attempts to create totalitarian regimes between 1922 and 1945 in Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia, and elsewhere.

Between World War I and World War II, several major European nations, under the leadership of men such as Mussolini, Stalin and Hitler, shunned democracy to open new historic paths towards 'totalitarianism' - the ideal of state control over all aspects of citizens' lives. This paper examines the pre-history and history of the principal regimes that aspired to totalitarian rule, as well as historical interpretations of their emergence and demise.

Paper title Totalitarian Regimes: Europe 1922-1945
Paper code HIST225
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One 100-level HIST paper or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
May not be credited together with HIST 231 passed in 2004.
Contact
mark.seymour@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Christopher Barber
Textbooks
Course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Appreciation of the intellectual currents and historical circumstances favouring totalitarian styles of rule
  • Understanding of the similarities and differences among historical attempts to create totalitarian regimes
  • An understanding of totalitarian regimes as political experiments
  • An appreciation of historical responses to systematic human atrocities
  • An understanding of the historical fragility of democracy.

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 15:00-15:50 8-13, 15-22
Thursday 15:00-15:50 8-13, 15-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Monday 12:00-12:50 10-11, 13, 16, 18, 20
T2 Monday 14:00-14:50 10-11, 13, 16, 18, 20
T3 Tuesday 12:00-12:50 10-11, 13, 16, 18, 20
T4 Tuesday 13:00-13:50 10-11, 13, 16, 18, 20