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INDV302 Whakapapa and Marae

Exploration of whakapapa (genealogically ordered knowledge), its physical manifestation, the marae (ritual centre of tribal communities across the Pacific), relevance to a post-Treaty-settlement, modern-day Aotearoa/New Zealand.

This paper is taught in seminar style. Whakapapa (genealogically ordered knowledge) will be utilised as the underpinning epistemology. The paper is taught in English.

Paper title Whakapapa and Marae
Paper code INDV302
Subject Indigenous Development/He Kura Matanui
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
MAOR 202
Restriction
MAOR 302
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
maori.studies@otago.ac.nz
or
Tel: 03 479 8674
Teaching staff
Lecturer: Professor Paul Tapsell
Paper Structure
Internal assessment 100%
Textbooks
2010 Hokowhitu, B., Kermoal, N., Andersen, C., Petersen, A., Reilly, M., Altamirano-Jimenez, I and Rewi, P (eds.) Indigenous Identity and Resistance, Researching the Diversity of Knowledge. Dunedin: Otago University Press.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Lifelong learning, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of INDV 302 the student will:
  • Have a strong grounding in core indigenous cultural values, concepts, issues and practices primarily associated with genealogical accountability (whakapapa) from a Māori tribal community perspective (marae)
  • Have an understanding of contemporary cultural, social, intellectual and economic development of indigenous peoples (Māori) in a national context
  • Have the ability to identify, analyse and discuss the cultural, social, intellectual and economic development of Māori
  • Be able to apply what is learnt about the cultural, social, intellectual and economic development of Māori and other indigenous peoples through fieldwork or in appropriate cultural institutions, such as marae

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Wednesday 10:00-11:50 9-15, 17-22

Exploration of whakapapa (genealogically ordered knowledge), its physical manifestation, the marae (ritual centre of tribal communities across the Pacific), relevance to a post-Treaty-settlement, modern-day Aotearoa/New Zealand.

This paper is taught in seminar style. Whakapapa (genealogically ordered knowledge) will be utilised as the underpinning epistemology. The paper is taught in English.

Paper title Whakapapa and Marae
Paper code INDV302
Subject Indigenous Development/He Kura Matanui
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
MAOR 202
Restriction
MAOR 302
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
maori.studies@otago.ac.nz
or
Tel 03 479 8674
Teaching staff
Lecturer: Professor Paul Tapsell
Paper Structure
Internal assessment 100%
Textbooks
2010 Hokowhitu, B., Kermoal, N., Andersen, C., Petersen, A., Reilly, M., Altamirano-Jimenez, I and Rewi, P (eds.) Indigenous Identity and Resistance, Researching the Diversity of Knowledge. Dunedin: Otago University Press.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Lifelong learning, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of INDV 302 the student will:
  • Have a strong grounding in core indigenous cultural values, concepts, issues and practices primarily associated with genealogical accountability (whakapapa) from a Māori tribal community perspective (marae)
  • Have an understanding of contemporary cultural, social, intellectual and economic development of indigenous peoples (Māori) in a national context
  • Have the ability to identify, analyse and discuss the cultural, social, intellectual and economic development of Māori
  • Be able to apply what is learnt about the cultural, social, intellectual and economic development of Māori and other indigenous peoples through fieldwork or in appropriate cultural institutions, such as marae

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard