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EDUC430 Junior and Young Adult Literature in Cultural Contexts

Examines the origins and development of literature produced for children and young adults. Investigates the socially constructed notion of childhood and critiques texts using the intersections between gender, class and race as categories of analysis.

This paper is designed to familiarise students with the discourses emerging from local and international scholarship in the field of children's literature research. By evaluating a range of historical and contemporary texts you will be well equipped to determine how notions of quality are mediated within learning contexts. This relatively new area of inquiry will open up for you a vast array of literatures produced for children and deepen your understandings about the role of children's literature as a vehicle for relaying and confronting dominant societal constructions. You will also have the opportunity to explore contemporary debates in relation to digital, print and film media and have your enhancement of children's literature expanded.

Paper title Junior and Young Adult Literature in Cultural Contexts
Paper code EDUC430
Subject Education
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2017
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $904.01
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,267.52

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Prerequisite
54 300-level EDUX or EDUC points
Notes
Students who have not passed the normal prerequisite may be admitted with approval from the Dean of the College of Education.
Eligibility
This paper would be suitable for those students who have completed a Bachelor of Teaching degree or a Bachelor of Education Studies degree to a high standard and for librarians and teachers with the appropriate qualifications who have an interest in developing their expertise in the area of children's literature.
Contact
Dr Keryn Pratt (College of Education), keryn.pratt@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Trish Brooking
Paper Structure
This paper examines the origins and development of literature produced for children and young adults. It investigates the socially constructed notion of childhood and critiques texts using the intersections between gender, class and race as categories of analysis.

The modules cover:
  • Origins in children's literature - mythology
  • Fairytales and folklore
  • Humour
  • Literary theory
  • Categories of analysis
  • Global literature and literature of migration
  • Children and society
  • Verbal and visual codes in picturebooks
  • Notions of quality and selection issues
  • Mixed media and multimodal texts
Textbooks
Students will be expected to access required readings via the library and the Internet and to source their own relevant readings.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper will be able
  • To critique national and international literature to develop an area of research interest
  • To critically examine a range of historical and contemporary children's texts to examine notions of quality
  • To appraise the role of critical and theoretical perspectives in text analysis

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Timetable

Not offered in 2017

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught through Distance Learning
Learning management system
Blackboard

Examines the origins and development of literature produced for children and young adults. Investigates the socially constructed notion of childhood and critiques texts using the intersections between gender, class and race as categories of analysis.

This paper is designed to familiarise students with the discourses emerging from local and international scholarship in the field of children's literature research. By evaluating a range of historical and contemporary texts you will be well equipped to determine how notions of quality are mediated within learning contexts. This relatively new area of inquiry will open up for you a vast array of literatures produced for children and deepen your understandings about the role of children's literature as a vehicle for relaying and confronting dominant societal constructions. You will also have the opportunity to explore contemporary debates in relation to digital, print and film media and have your enhancement of children's literature expanded.

Paper title Junior and Young Adult Literature in Cultural Contexts
Paper code EDUC430
Subject Education
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
54 300-level EDUX or EDUC points
Notes
Students who have not passed the normal prerequisite may be admitted with approval from the Dean of the College of Education.
Eligibility
This paper would be suitable for those students who have completed a Bachelor of Teaching degree or a Bachelor of Education Studies degree to a high standard and for librarians and teachers with the appropriate qualifications who have an interest in developing their expertise in the area of children's literature.
Contact
postgrad.education@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Trish Brooking
Textbooks
Students will be expected to access required readings via the library and the Internet and to source their own relevant readings.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Paper Structure
This paper examines the origins and development of literature produced for children and young adults. It investigates the socially constructed notion of childhood and critiques texts using the intersections between gender, class and race as categories of analysis.

The modules cover:
  • Origins in children's literature - mythology
  • Fairytales and folklore
  • Humour
  • Literary theory
  • Categories of analysis
  • Global literature and literature of migration
  • Children and society
  • Verbal and visual codes in picturebooks
  • Notions of quality and selection issues
  • Mixed media and multimodal texts
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper will be able
  • To critique national and international literature to develop an area of research interest
  • To critically examine a range of historical and contemporary children's texts to examine notions of quality
  • To appraise the role of critical and theoretical perspectives in text analysis

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught through Distance Learning
Learning management system
Blackboard