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Humanities podcasts

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Why Study Humanities? "I like it and it's important Aunty!" (266.05 MB)
Wednesday, 14 December 2016
Professor Jon Hall, Classics, gives the graduation address at the Arts, Music and Theology graduation ceremony on 14 December 2016.

CTPI: Why Theology Matters to Tree Frogs (233.62 MB)
Sunday, 20 November 2016
A Public Lecture with Rev. Peter Harris, Anglican Minister, Conservationist, and Co-Founder of Christian Conservation Organisation A Rocha. 24 November 2016

CTPI: Why Theology Matters to Tree Frogs (90.01 MB)
Sunday, 20 November 2016
A Public Lecture with Rev. Peter Harris, Anglican Minister, Conservationist, and Co-Founder of Christian Conservation Organisation A Rocha. 24 November 2016

CTPI & NCPACS: World Council of Churches' Response to Religious Violence (102.44 MB)
Friday, 7 October 2016
Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit addresses the World Council of Churches Central Committee’s recent ‘Statement on Religion and Violence’ (28 June 2016), which addresses the persistence and spread of extremist violence in the world, and its ambiguous connections with religion. 7 October 2016.

CTPI & NCPACS: World Council of Churches' Response to Religious Violence (276.49 MB)
Friday, 7 October 2016
Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit addresses the World Council of Churches Central Committee’s recent ‘Statement on Religion and Violence’ (28 June 2016), which addresses the persistence and spread of extremist violence in the world, and its ambiguous connections with religion. 7 October 2016.

Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture: The politics of compassion in a world of ruthless power (87.81 MB)
Wednesday, 28 September 2016
Professor Kevin Clements delivers the 2016 Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture. 28 September 2016

Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture: The politics of compassion in a world of ruthless power (155.65 MB)
Wednesday, 28 September 2016
Professor Kevin Clements delivers the 2016 Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture. 28 September 2016

IPL: Planning biodiverse cities for all ages (253.38 MB)
Tuesday, 20 September 2016
As an environmental planner, Claire Freeman’s research focuses on the intersection of the natural and built environment. She examines how environmental relationships can be enhanced through more effective planning policy, design and practice. In particular, she looks at how planning can help create urban environments that work better for children and young people, and for nature. It links across three major disciplinary fields; the social sciences, biological science and planning. Some current and recent projects she is involved with are: “Natural neighbourhoods for city children”, a Marsden-funded study exploring how children in Dunedin, Auckland and Wellington connect with nature in their daily lives; “the Dunedin Garden Study,” which investigates householders’ relationships with native biodiversity in their gardens; “Children and young people’s experiences following the Christchurch earthquake”; and a study of “Children’s experiences of neighbourhood” in New Zealand, Fiji and Kiribati. 20 September 2016

IPL: Planning biodiverse cities for all ages (75.54 MB)
Tuesday, 20 September 2016
As an environmental planner, Claire Freeman’s research focuses on the intersection of the natural and built environment. She examines how environmental relationships can be enhanced through more effective planning policy, design and practice. In particular, she looks at how planning can help create urban environments that work better for children and young people, and for nature. It links across three major disciplinary fields; the social sciences, biological science and planning. Some current and recent projects she is involved with are: “Natural neighbourhoods for city children”, a Marsden-funded study exploring how children in Dunedin, Auckland and Wellington connect with nature in their daily lives; “the Dunedin Garden Study,” which investigates householders’ relationships with native biodiversity in their gardens; “Children and young people’s experiences following the Christchurch earthquake”; and a study of “Children’s experiences of neighbourhood” in New Zealand, Fiji and Kiribati. 20 September 2016

IPL: Toitū te Whenua, Toitū te Mana (168.27 MB)
Monday, 12 September 2016
In this Inaugural Professorial Lecture, Professor Jacinta Ruru anchors her research journey within this Māori proverb to help bring alive the endurance and 'foreverness' of the Māori world in Aotearoa. Professor Ruru shares the ways in which she has sought to contribute towards challenging the law to more respectfully recognise and embrace Indigenous peoples’ authority, laws, values, rights and responsibilities to own, govern and manage land and water. 12 September 2016

IPL: Toitū te Whenua, Toitū te Mana (61.57 MB)
Monday, 12 September 2016
In this Inaugural Professorial Lecture, Professor Jacinta Ruru anchors her research journey within this Māori proverb to help bring alive the endurance and 'foreverness' of the Māori world in Aotearoa. Professor Ruru shares the ways in which she has sought to contribute towards challenging the law to more respectfully recognise and embrace Indigenous peoples’ authority, laws, values, rights and responsibilities to own, govern and manage land and water. 12 September 2016

Theology and Religion: Towards an Ecumenical Political Theology: Charisms Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist (44.85 MB)
Tuesday, 6 September 2016
Rev Dr Doug Gay is the Stuart Residence Halls Council Distinguished Visitor for 2016. In this public lecture, he traces the outline of an ecumenical political theology incorporating the Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist traditions of narrative, discipline and witness, with particular reference to the political and economic environment and events leading to the post 2008 economic crisis. 6 September 2016.

Theology and Religion: Towards an Ecumenical Political Theology: Charisms Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist (76.78 MB)
Tuesday, 6 September 2016
Rev Dr Doug Gay is the Stuart Residence Halls Council Distinguished Visitor for 2016. In this public lecture, he traces the outline of an ecumenical political theology incorporating the Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist traditions of narrative, discipline and witness, with particular reference to the political and economic environment and events leading to the post 2008 economic crisis. 6 September 2016.

National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies: Adam Curle Radical Peacemaker (23.33 MB)
Wednesday, 31 August 2016
Professor Kevin Clements gives a recorded presentation to the Adam Curle Symposium held at the University of Bradford

National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies: Adam Curle Radical Peacemaker (12.84 MB)
Wednesday, 31 August 2016
Professor Kevin Clements gives a recorded presentation to the Adam Curle Symposium held at the University of Bradford

Peace Lecture 2016: Between Law and Spirituality – Islam’s legal basis for its spirit of peaceful coexistence (303.99 MB)
Wednesday, 24 August 2016
Imam Afroz Ali is the founder and president of Al-Ghazzali Centre for Islamic Sciences & Human Development in Sydney, Australia, and an Australian Ambassador for the Charter of Compassion. He is also is a founding member of the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change and served as managing director for SeekersHub Global. This is the 13th annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group. 24 August 2016

Peace Lecture 2016: Between Law and Spirituality – Islam’s legal basis for its spirit of peaceful coexistence (101.35 MB)
Wednesday, 24 August 2016
Imam Afroz Ali is the founder and president of Al-Ghazzali Centre for Islamic Sciences & Human Development in Sydney, Australia, and an Australian Ambassador for the Charter of Compassion. He is also a founding member of the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change and served as managing director for SeekersHub Global. This is the 13th annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group. 24 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 6 (83.99 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in Modern Literature'. 4 August 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Graham Virgo - Conscience in Equity: a new Utopia (147.72 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Faculty of Law presents this public lecture by Professor Graham Virgo, 2016 NZ Law Foundation Distinguished Visiting Fellow, 2016 FW Guest Memorial Lecturer. In 1516 Sir Thomas More published 'Utopia', which identifies an attractive vision of law and society. As Lord Chancellor, More helped to develop Equity as a mechanism to secure justice which was not provided through the rigid interpretation of the Common Law. From the start, the equitable jurisdiction was founded on conscience. By tracing the historical development of conscience it is possible to identify the theoretical structure which justifies and explains the equitable jurisdiction and shows how it should develop in the future.

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 6 (141.79 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in Modern Literature'. 4 August 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Graham Virgo - Conscience in Equity: a new Utopia (59.09 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Faculty of Law presents this public lecture by Professor Graham Virgo, 2016 NZ Law Foundation Distinguished Visiting Fellow, 2016 FW Guest Memorial Lecturer. In 1516 Sir Thomas More published Utopia, which identifies an attractive vision of law and society. As Lord Chancellor, More helped to develop Equity as a mechanism to secure justice which was not provided through the rigid interpretation of the Common Law. From the start, the equitable jurisdiction was founded on conscience. By tracing the historical development of conscience it is possible to identify the theoretical structure which justifies and explains the equitable jurisdiction and shows how it should develop in the future.

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 5 (85.92 MB)
Wednesday, 3 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job Through the Eyes of Artists'. 3 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 5 (175.84 MB)
Wednesday, 3 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job Through the Eyes of Artists'. 3 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 4 (97.48 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job as a Contested Classic'. 2 August 2016

IPL: Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development (67.12 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
Professor Etienne Nel of the Department of Geography, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development”. Etienne has authored, co-authored or edited 10 books, and has written nearly 30 book chapters and more than 100 articles, primarily on economic development in Africa. 2 August 2016

IPL: Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development (143.84 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
Professor Etienne Nel of the Department of Geography, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development”. Etienne has authored, co-authored or edited 10 books, and has written nearly 30 book chapters and more than 100 articles, primarily on economic development in Africa. 2 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 4 (151.82 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job as a Contested Classic'. 2 August 2016

NCPACS: After Chilcot: The consequences of the Chilcot Report for armed intervention and war (61.83 MB)
Monday, 1 August 2016
This forum reflects on some of the global lessons to be learned from the Chilcot report. The report systematically and comprehensively demolishes Tony Blair and George Bush’s justifications for embroiling the UK in the most disastrous war of the modern era. It also raises some fundamental questions about international criminal accountability for acts of aggression and wider questions about where the responsibility for war should lie in Westminster-style democracies. The panel includes Professor Robert Patman (Politics), Associate Professor Lisa Ellis (Philosophy) and Mr Stephen Smith (Law), chaired by Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS). 1 August 2016

NCPACS: After Chilcot: The consequences of the Chilcot Report for armed intervention and war (189.00 MB)
Monday, 1 August 2016
This forum reflects on some of the global lessons to be learned from the Chilcot report. The report systematically and comprehensively demolishes Tony Blair and George Bush’s justifications for embroiling the UK in the most disastrous war of the modern era. It also raises some fundamental questions about international criminal accountability for acts of aggression and wider questions about where the responsibility for war should lie in Westminster-style democracies. The panel includes Professor Robert Patman (Politics), Associate Professor Lisa Ellis (Philosophy) and Mr Stephen Smith (Law), chaired by Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS). 1 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 3 (142.81 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Theological Conversations in Job'. 28 July 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 3 (87.72 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Theological Conversations in Job'. 28 July 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Jeremy Waldron - Death lists and death squads: Targeted killing and the character of the State (154.83 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
'My intention in this lecture is to urge critical reflection upon current US practices of targeted killing by considering, not just whether acts of targeted killing can be legally justified, but also what sort of state we are turning into when we organize the use of lethal force in this way -maintaining a list of named enemies of the state who are to be eliminated in this way.' A prolific scholar, Jeremy Waldron teaches legal and political philosophy at NYU School of Law. Until recently, he was also Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory at Oxford University (All Souls College).

Faculty of Law: Professor Jeremy Waldron - Death lists and death squads: Targeted killing and the character of the State (56.54 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
'My intention in this lecture is to urge critical reflection upon current US practices of targeted killing by considering, not just whether acts of targeted killing can be legally justified, but also what sort of state we are turning into when we organize the use of lethal force in this way -maintaining a list of named enemies of the state who are to be eliminated in this way.' A prolific scholar, Jeremy Waldron teaches legal and political philosophy at NYU School of Law. Until recently, he was also Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory at Oxford University (All Souls College).

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 2 (83.58 MB)
Wednesday, 27 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'The Artistry of the (Hebrew) Book of Job'. 27 July 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 2 (188.33 MB)
Wednesday, 27 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'The Artistry of the (Hebrew) Book of Job'. 27 July 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 1 (148.84 MB)
Tuesday, 26 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in the Cradle of World Literature'. 26 July 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 1 (81.12 MB)
Tuesday, 26 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in the Cradle of World Literature'. 26 July 2016

Meet the 2016 Otago Fellows (94.58 MB)
Sunday, 17 July 2016
The 2016 University of Otago Fellows: Victor Rodger (Robert Burns Fellow), Miranda Parkes (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Chris Gendall (Mozart Fellow), val smith (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Barbara Else (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts. 17 July 2016

Meet the 2016 Otago Fellows (307.01 MB)
Sunday, 17 July 2016
The 2016 University of Otago Fellows: Victor Rodger (Robert Burns Fellow), Miranda Parkes (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Chris Gendall (Mozart Fellow), val smith (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Barbara Else (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts. 17 July 2016

IPL: Hoka: Motivators of Time (142.47 MB)
Thursday, 14 July 2016
Professor Poia Rewi of Te Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture, "Hoka: Motivators of Time". Professor Rewi (Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Te Arawa) works on a regional and national level in multiple areas of Te Reo promotion, teaching and research. 14 July 2016.

IPL: Hoka: Motivators of Time (74.80 MB)
Thursday, 14 July 2016
Professor Poia Rewi of Te Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture, "Hoka: Motivators of Time". Professor Rewi (Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Te Arawa) works on a regional and national level in multiple areas of Te Reo promotion, teaching and research. 14 July 2016.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Professor Roger Clark (66.51 MB)
Thursday, 7 July 2016
Professor Roger Clark is a graduate of Victoria University of Wellington and of Columbia Law School in New York. He began his teaching career at Victoria in 1964 and has taught at Rutgers Law School in New Jersey since 1972. He represented Samoa at the International Court of Justice in the Advisory Proceedings on the Legality of the Use or Threat of use of Nuclear Weapons in 1995 and is currently a member of the team representing the Marshall Islands in its ICJ cases on nuclear weapons. The team has been nominated by the International Peace Bureau for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize. In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS), Professor Clark will discuss the influences that have determined the course of his life and career.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Professor Roger Clark (244.74 MB)
Thursday, 7 July 2016
Professor Roger Clark is a graduate of Victoria University of Wellington and of Columbia Law School in New York. He began his teaching career at Victoria in 1964 and has taught at Rutgers Law School in New Jersey since 1972. He represented Samoa at the International Court of Justice in the Advisory Proceedings on the Legality of the Use or Threat of use of Nuclear Weapons in 1995 and is currently a member of the team representing the Marshall Islands in its ICJ cases on nuclear weapons. The team has been nominated by the International Peace Bureau for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize. In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS), Professor Clark will discuss the influences that have determined the course of his life and career.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Ven. Robina Courtin (166.83 MB)
Friday, 3 June 2016
Venerable Robina Courtin has spent much of her life working for peace in various ways, initially as a left-wing feminist activist, and later as a Buddhist nun. In conversation with Joe Llewelyn she shares some of her wealth of knowledge and experience, including her work with prisoners and teaching around the world.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Ven. Robina Courtin (45.35 MB)
Friday, 3 June 2016
Venerable Robina Courtin has spent much of her life working for peace in various ways, initially as a left-wing feminist activist, and later as a Buddhist nun. In conversation with Joe Llewelyn she shares some of her wealth of knowledge and experience, including her work with prisoners and teaching around the world.

Faculty of Law: Pike River - How could this happen in this day and age? (107.88 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2016
Colin Smith, Chairman on the Pike River Families Group Committee and the Pike River 29 Legacy Trust, talks about the Pike River disaster and asks how could this happen in this day and age? Find out why the Pike River Families have fought so hard and for so long. Colin Smith is a law graduate from the University of Otago and is a partner with the Greymouth Law Firm Hannan & Seddon.

Faculty of Law: Pike River - How could this happen in this day and age? (59.86 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2016
Colin Smith, Chairman on the Pike River Families Group Committee and the Pike River 29 Legacy Trust, talks about the Pike River disaster and asks how could this happen in this day and age? Find out why the Pike River Families have fought so hard and for so long. Colin Smith is a law graduate from the University of Otago and is a partner with the Greymouth Law Firm Hannan & Seddon.

CTPI: Good Governance - Designing Democratic Institutions for a Sustainable Future (147.65 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Public Lecture with Professor Jonathan Boston from the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. He discusses the role of governance in sustainability and how to move from a short term focus at a governmental level to a longer term focus.

CTPI: Good Governance - Designing Democratic Institutions for a Sustainable Future (67.76 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Public Lecture with Professor Jonathan Boston from the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. He discusses the role of governance in sustainability and how to move from a short term focus at a governmental level to a longer term focus.

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2016 – Making the penalty fit the crime: the pros and cons of civil pecuniary penalties as a means of enforcing commercial law (97.41 MB)
Wednesday, 4 May 2016
Civil pecuniary penalties are an increasingly common feature of regulatory legislation such as the Commerce Act 1986 and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013. They have been both welcomed as a pragmatic “third way” between purely civil remedies and criminal charges and condemned as incompatible with human rights and the principles which underpin the criminal justice system. This lecture considers both sides of the debate and whether it is possible to reconcile the competing views. Presented by Jenny Cooper, who graduated from Otago in 1995 and now practices in Auckland as a commercial barrister with specialist expertise in company and securities law and fair trading and competition law.

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2016 – Making the penalty fit the crime: the pros and cons of civil pecuniary penalties as a means of enforcing commercial law (49.89 MB)
Wednesday, 4 May 2016
Civil pecuniary penalties are an increasingly common feature of regulatory legislation such as the Commerce Act 1986 and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013. They have been both welcomed as a pragmatic “third way” between purely civil remedies and criminal charges and condemned as incompatible with human rights and the principles which underpin the criminal justice system. This lecture considers both sides of the debate and whether it is possible to reconcile the competing views. Presented by Jenny Cooper, who graduated from Otago in 1995 and now practices in Auckland as a commercial barrister with specialist expertise in company and securities law and fair trading and competition law.

IPL: Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome (58.65 MB)
Tuesday, 3 May 2016
Professor Jon Hall, Head of the Department of Classics, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome”. Jon's research focuses on Cicero – in particular, Cicero's letters and speeches. Recently Jon completed a book on Cicero’s use of showmanship in the Roman law courts. 3 May 2016

IPL: Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome (130.78 MB)
Tuesday, 3 May 2016
Professor Jon Hall, Head of the Department of Classics, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome”. Jon's research focuses on Cicero – in particular, Cicero's letters and speeches. Recently Jon completed a book on Cicero’s use of showmanship in the Roman law courts. 3 May 2016

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Relational Self (48.50 MB)
Thursday, 21 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Relational Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the fourth of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Relational Self (105.61 MB)
Thursday, 21 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Relational Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the fourth of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

Faculty of Law: The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects (67.14 MB)
Tuesday, 19 April 2016
James and Jean Davis Prestige Visiting Fellow, Professor Don McRae C.C delivers a public lecture on 'The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects'. The lecture focuses on the changes that have occurred in the field of international law over the past 50 years, and the challenges that these developments pose for both the theory and practice of international law including its legitimacy.

Faculty of Law: The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects (155.88 MB)
Tuesday, 19 April 2016
James and Jean Davis Prestige Visiting Fellow, Professor Don McRae C.C delivers a public lecture on 'The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects'. The lecture focuses on the changes that have occurred in the field of international law over the past 50 years, and the challenges that these developments pose for both the theory and practice of international law including its legitimacy.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Abused Self (56.54 MB)
Thursday, 14 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Abused Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the third of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Abused Self (94.52 MB)
Thursday, 14 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Abused Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the third of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Caring Self (127.32 MB)
Tuesday, 12 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Caring Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the second of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Caring Self (69.16 MB)
Tuesday, 12 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Caring Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the second of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Vulnerable Self (121.92 MB)
Monday, 21 March 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Vulnerable Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the first of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Vulnerable Self (63.16 MB)
Monday, 21 March 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Vulnerable Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the first of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

IPL: "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre (206.11 MB)
Wednesday, 9 March 2016
Professor Stuart Young's Inaugural Professorial Lecture is entitled "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre. Professor Stuart Young is currently Head of the Department of Music (which incorporates the Theatre Studies programme and the Bachelor of Peforming Arts programme). His research interests include Documentary/Verbatim Theatre; Russian drama, in particular Chekhov, and its reception abroad; Translation Studies and translation for the theatre; Modern British drama and theatre; New Zealand drama and theatre; Gay and queer drama. 8 March 2016

IPL: "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre (69.02 MB)
Wednesday, 9 March 2016
Professor Stuart Young's Inaugural Professorial Lecture is entitled "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre. Professor Stuart Young is currently Head of the Department of Music (which incorporates the Theatre Studies programme and the Bachelor of Peforming Arts programme). His research interests include Documentary/Verbatim Theatre; Russian drama, in particular Chekhov, and its reception abroad; Translation Studies and translation for the theatre; Modern British drama and theatre; New Zealand drama and theatre; Gay and queer drama. 8 March 2016

Erica Chenoweth - Why civil resistance works (46.21 MB)
Thursday, 11 February 2016
Between 1900 and 2015, campaigns of nonviolent resistance were about twice as effective as violent insurgencies. In this talk, Professor Erica Chenoweth will review the impressive historical record of civil resistance in the 20th century and discuss the promise of unarmed struggle in the 21st century. She will expand upon her book (co-authored with Maria Stephan) 'Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict', which won the 2013 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.

Erica Chenoweth - Why civil resistance works (131.58 MB)
Thursday, 11 February 2016
Between 1900 and 2015, campaigns of nonviolent resistance were about twice as effective as violent insurgencies. In this talk, Professor Erica Chenoweth will review the impressive historical record of civil resistance in the 20th century and discuss the promise of unarmed struggle in the 21st century. She will expand upon her book (co-authored with Maria Stephan) 'Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict', which won the 2013 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.

Public Conversation with Professor Erica Chenoweth (171.06 MB)
Thursday, 4 February 2016
Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives, in 2014 she received the 2014 Karl Deutsch Award, given annually to the scholar under the age of 40 who has made the greatest impact on the field of international politics or peace research. In this conversation she discusses her life, influences and research with Dr Charles Butcher from the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Public Conversation with Professor Erica Chenoweth (70.32 MB)
Thursday, 4 February 2016
Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives, in 2014 she received the 2014 Karl Deutsch Award, given annually to the scholar under the age of 40 who has made the greatest impact on the field of international politics or peace research. In this conversation she discusses her life, influences and research with Dr Charles Butcher from the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Erica Chenoweth - 'Do Violent Flanks Help or Hurt Campaigns of Nonviolent Resistance?' (224.00 MB)
Tuesday, 2 February 2016
An open lecture by Erica Chenoweth, Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives.

Erica Chenoweth - 'Do Violent Flanks Help or Hurt Campaigns of Nonviolent Resistance?' (98.35 MB)
Tuesday, 2 February 2016
An open lecture by Erica Chenoweth, Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives.

NCPACS: Public Conversation - How wars end: Past trends and future prospects (311.29 MB)
Tuesday, 3 November 2015
Dr. Joakim Kreutz, Assistant Professor at the University of Uppsala, is an expert on how wars end, and what causes them to end. His research has focused on trends in war termination over the past 60 years, and more recently has examined the Colombian peace process and EU engagement in humanitarian intervention. This public conversation will explore Dr. Kreutz's pathway into this research area, some of the main findings in recent research on war termination, and how these insights might be applied to contemporary conflicts. 3 November 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation - How wars end: Past trends and future prospects (72.49 MB)
Tuesday, 3 November 2015
Dr. Joakim Kreutz, Assistant Professor at the University of Uppsala, is an expert on how wars end, and what causes them to end. His research has focused on trends in war termination over the past 60 years, and more recently has examined the Colombian peace process and EU engagement in humanitarian intervention. This public conversation will explore Dr. Kreutz's pathway into this research area, some of the main findings in recent research on war termination, and how these insights might be applied to contemporary conflicts. 3 November 2015

Michael King Memorial Lecture 2015: Sir Tipene O’Regan - A Wanaka Without Walls: A Kai Tahu Knowledge Base of our own (79.95 MB)
Thursday, 1 October 2015
Sir Tipene O’Regan is best known as a long serving chairman of the Ngai Tahu Maori Trust board and as a key figure in the leadership of the Ngai Tahu claim to the Waitangi tribunal and he has been very influential in many other roles. Here he illuminates very important aspects of our places’ past, present, and its future and reflects on key cultural and historical issues of particular pertinence of all New Zealander’s including history, knowledge and tribal identity. 1 October 2015

Michael King Memorial Lecture 2015: Sir Tipene O’Regan - A Wanaka Without Walls: A Kai Tahu Knowledge Base of our own (247.50 MB)
Thursday, 1 October 2015
Sir Tipene O’Regan is best known as a long serving chairman of the Ngai Tahu Maori Trust board and as a key figure in the leadership of the Ngai Tahu claim to the Waitangi tribunal and he has been very influential in many other roles. Here he illuminates very important aspects of our places’ past, present, and its future and reflects on key cultural and historical issues of particular pertinence of all New Zealander’s including history, knowledge and tribal identity. 1 October 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The Peace of Islam (219.84 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
Professor Richard Jackson talks to Dr Najibullah Lafraie, Department of Politics, who discusses a range of issues he is concerned about. Dr Lafraie discusses his family and growing up in Afghanistan, the effect of religion in his life and his early education through his study. After leaving Afghanistan for a short time, he returned to carry out his PhD study and continued on to join the resistance against the Soviet Union and continues with how he stayed in the country, in hiding, when the Taliban were present, to finally coming to live in New Zealand. 28 September 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The Peace of Islam (67.96 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
Professor Richard Jackson talks to Dr Najibullah Lafraie, Department of Politics, who discusses a range of issues he is concerned about. Dr Lafraie discusses his family and growing up in Afghanistan, the effect of religion in his life and his early education through his study. After leaving Afghanistan for a short time, he returned to carry out his PhD study and continued on to join the resistance against the Soviet Union and continues with how he stayed in the country, in hiding, when the Taliban were present, to finally coming to live in New Zealand. 28 September 2015

CTPI: Faith and Wisdom in Science (331.35 MB)
Tuesday, 22 September 2015
In this talk Professor Tom McLeish, Professor of Physics at Durham University. Tom discusses themes from his recently published book ‘Faith and Wisdom in Science’ (Oxford University Press, 2014). In this book, Tom takes a scientist’s reading of the Old Testament’s Book of Job and uses this ancient text as a centrepiece to make the case for science as a deeply human and ancient activity, embedded in some of the oldest stories told about the human desire to understand the natural world. Drawing on stories from the modern science of chaos and uncertainty, alongside medieval, patristic, classical and Biblical sources, Faith and Wisdom in Science challenges much of the current “science and religion” debate as operating with the wrong assumptions and in the wrong space. There are immediate consequences for how we treat science in government, the media, in education and in churches. 22 September 2015

CTPI: Faith and Wisdom in Science (89.39 MB)
Tuesday, 22 September 2015
In this talk Professor Tom McLeish, Professor of Physics at Durham University. Tom discusses themes from his recently published book ‘Faith and Wisdom in Science’ (Oxford University Press, 2014). In this book, Tom takes a scientist’s reading of the Old Testament’s Book of Job and uses this ancient text as a centrepiece to make the case for science as a deeply human and ancient activity, embedded in some of the oldest stories told about the human desire to understand the natural world. Drawing on stories from the modern science of chaos and uncertainty, alongside medieval, patristic, classical and Biblical sources, Faith and Wisdom in Science challenges much of the current “science and religion” debate as operating with the wrong assumptions and in the wrong space. There are immediate consequences for how we treat science in government, the media, in education and in churches. 22 September 2015

2015 Archibald Baxter Memorial Trust Peace Lecture – Professor David Tombs (110.96 MB)
Monday, 21 September 2015
Professor David Tombs, Director, Centre for Theology and Public Issues, University of Otago, speaks about the US Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture (2014), which has strongly criticised the interrogation programme overseen by the CIA in the aftermath of 9/11. He connects this to studies of torture practices under authoritarian regimes in Latin America, and suggests that it is also relevant to the field punishment of Archibald Baxter, and other conscience objectors, in World War I. 21 September 2015

2015 Archibald Baxter Memorial Trust Peace Lecture – Professor David Tombs (73.66 MB)
Monday, 21 September 2015
Professor David Tombs, Director, Centre for Theology and Public Issues, University of Otago, speaks about the US Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture (2014), which has strongly criticised the interrogation programme overseen by the CIA in the aftermath of 9/11. He connects this to studies of torture practices under authoritarian regimes in Latin America, and suggests that it is also relevant to the field punishment of Archibald Baxter, and other conscience objectors, in World War I. 21 September 2015

Peace Lecture 2015: Pursuing peace in a time of peace and a time of war (92.41 MB)
Wednesday, 9 September 2015
The twelfth annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group, is given by Rabbi Fred Morgan, Professorial Fellow, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne. In this talk Rabbi Fred Morgan will address a number of questions – Does the notion of pursuing peace have to be modified according to the time in which we find ourselves? How do the dynamics of pursuing peace change from one context to the other? What is the role of religions in times of peace and times of war? And how do the dynamics of pursuing peace under different circumstances impact on interfaith relations? 9 September 2015

Peace Lecture 2015: Pursuing peace in a time of peace and a time of war (343.46 MB)
Wednesday, 9 September 2015
The twelfth annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group, is given by Rabbi Fred Morgan, Professorial Fellow, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne. In this talk Rabbi Fred Morgan will address a number of questions – Does the notion of pursuing peace have to be modified according to the time in which we find ourselves? How do the dynamics of pursuing peace change from one context to the other? What is the role of religions in times of peace and times of war? And how do the dynamics of pursuing peace under different circumstances impact on interfaith relations? 9 September 2015

IPL: Latin American Liberation Theology and its Ongoing Legacy (180.77 MB)
Tuesday, 8 September 2015
Professor David Tombs holds the Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues and is Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at the University of Otago. His Inaugural Professorial Lecture discusses Latin American liberation theology and its ongoing legacy. 8 September 2015

IPL: Latin American Liberation Theology and its Ongoing Legacy (64.90 MB)
Tuesday, 8 September 2015
Professor David Tombs holds the Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues and is Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at the University of Otago. His Inaugural Professorial Lecture discusses Latin American liberation theology and its ongoing legacy. 8 September 2015

CTPI: Can there be a unified theory of religious freedom? (69.96 MB)
Wednesday, 19 August 2015
In this talk Professor Peter Danchin, Professor of Law and Director of the International and Comparative Law Program at the University of Maryland School of Law discusses the three key concepts in modern religious freedom discourse – neutrality, universality and legality. What is increasingly recognised, however, is the extent to which these concepts are inextricably entangled, historically and substantively, with theological concepts and categories. In drawing out these connections and assessing their implications for three central questions concerning the subject, object and justification of the right to religious liberty, this talk asks whether there can be a unified theory of religious freedom and in what sense we can say the right is independent of religious traditions and the contested notions of freedom within them. 19 August 2015

CTPI: Can there be a unified theory of religious freedom? (242.97 MB)
Wednesday, 19 August 2015
In this talk Professor Peter Danchin, Professor of Law and Director of the International and Comparative Law Program at the University of Maryland School of Law discusses the three key concepts in modern religious freedom discourse – neutrality, universality and legality. What is increasingly recognised, however, is the extent to which these concepts are inextricably entangled, historically and substantively, with theological concepts and categories. In drawing out these connections and assessing their implications for three central questions concerning the subject, object and justification of the right to religious liberty, this talk asks whether there can be a unified theory of religious freedom and in what sense we can say the right is independent of religious traditions and the contested notions of freedom within them. 19 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Katherine Runswick-Cole (35.83 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
Katherine Runswick-Cole, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, discusses her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’ which she completed in collaboration with Dan Goodley of the University of Sheffield, UK. In this paper they seek to develop an understanding of social policy driven by a commitment to the politics of disability, especially the politics of people labeled with learning disabilities. 12 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Katherine Runswick-Cole (26.88 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
Katherine Runswick-Cole, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, discusses her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’ which she completed in collaboration with Dan Goodley of the University of Sheffield, UK. In this paper they seek to develop an understanding of social policy driven by a commitment to the politics of disability, especially the politics of people labeled with learning disabilities. 12 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Paul Gibson (153.36 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
This presentation given by Paul Gibson, Disability Rights Commissioner, follows on from Katherine Runswick-Cole’s talk on her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’. In this talk he focuses on the journey of understanding, and the role of research in making disability rights real. 12 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Paul Gibson (49.50 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
This presentation given by Paul Gibson, Disability Rights Commissioner, follows on from Katherine Runswick-Cole’s talk on her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’. In this talk he focuses on the journey of understanding, and the role of research in making disability rights real. 12 August 2015

2015 Hocken Lecture: 'Archives, Public Memory and the work of history' (94.89 MB)
Thursday, 6 August 2015
Professor Tony Ballantyne, former Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, Chair of the Hocken Collections Committee and Director of the University’s Centre for Research on Colonial Culture has been engaged in a long-running research project on the production of colonial culture. This lecture explores the nature of archives, the possibilities of digitisation, and the role of both archival collections and historical writing in the making and remaking of cultural memory. 6 August 2015

2015 Hocken Lecture: 'Archives, Public Memory and the work of history' (292.42 MB)
Thursday, 6 August 2015
Professor Tony Ballantyne, former Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, Chair of the Hocken Collections Committee and Director of the University’s Centre for Research on Colonial Culture has been engaged in a long-running research project on the production of colonial culture. This lecture explores the nature of archives, the possibilities of digitisation, and the role of both archival collections and historical writing in the making and remaking of cultural memory. 6 August 2015

CTPI: Changing our mind on the LGBT issue (54.94 MB)
Thursday, 30 July 2015
Dr. David P. Gushee is a Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. His research interests focus on the ethical teachings of Jesus Christ and the Christian theological-ethical tradition, together with its contemporary implications for Christian discipleship and public witness. In this talk he speaks on his personal journey toward a change of his own heart and mind in becoming an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender inclusion in the Church, and his recent book ‘Changing Our Mind’ and the impact that it is having. 30 July 2015

CTPI: Changing our mind on the LGBT issue (146.45 MB)
Thursday, 30 July 2015
Dr. David P. Gushee is a Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. His research interests focus on the ethical teachings of Jesus Christ and the Christian theological-ethical tradition, together with its contemporary implications for Christian discipleship and public witness. In this talk he speaks on his personal journey toward a change of his own heart and mind in becoming an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender inclusion in the Church, and his recent book ‘Changing Our Mind’ and the impact that it is having. 30 July 2015

Philosophy: 2015 Dan & Gwen Taylor Lecture: Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity (196.32 MB)
Tuesday, 28 July 2015
Professor Jeremy Waldron, Professor of Law at New York University speaks on the topic of ‘Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity’. What does it mean to say we are all one another’s equals? Does a sense of equality distinguish humans from other animals? On what is this human equality based? Is it a religious idea? Is it a practical commitment? Is it just a matter of human rights? Is there supposed to be some shared feature that all human beings have in common? And if we take that approach, what are we to say about our brothers and sisters who suffer from profound disability—whose human claims seem to outstrip any particular description that they satisfy or any capacity that they have? 28 July 2015

Philosophy: 2015 Dan & Gwen Taylor Lecture: Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity (55.66 MB)
Tuesday, 28 July 2015
Professor Jeremy Waldron, Professor of Law at New York University speaks on the topic of ‘Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity’. What does it mean to say we are all one another’s equals? Does a sense of equality distinguish humans from other animals? On what is this human equality based? Is it a religious idea? Is it a practical commitment? Is it just a matter of human rights? Is there supposed to be some shared feature that all human beings have in common? And if we take that approach, what are we to say about our brothers and sisters who suffer from profound disability—whose human claims seem to outstrip any particular description that they satisfy or any capacity that they have? 28 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Magna Carta in a Handcart, From 1215 to 2015 and Far Beyond (90.51 MB)
Tuesday, 21 July 2015
What’s Magna Carta — legal icon, myth, or misconception? When was Magna Carta —1215, say the historians, the lawyers (were they to agree) might say 1297. In this talk Dr Nigel Jamieson, Faculty of Law at the University of Otago discusses what Magna Carta might mean for us today — being in Latin most modernists would shrug it off; some cynics say it means nothing much, since it’s only called the Great Charter because in 1215 they couldn’t text it down to twenty words; others say it’s not for us today because we’re far more up with the political play; and then there are those today who extol it to divert our attention away from the fact that they’re fiddling the books behind our backs. 21 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Magna Carta in a Handcart, From 1215 to 2015 and Far Beyond (204.97 MB)
Tuesday, 21 July 2015
What’s Magna Carta — legal icon, myth, or misconception? When was Magna Carta —1215, say the historians, the lawyers (were they to agree) might say 1297. In this talk Dr Nigel Jamieson, Faculty of Law at the University of Otago discusses what Magna Carta might mean for us today — being in Latin most modernists would shrug it off; some cynics say it means nothing much, since it’s only called the Great Charter because in 1215 they couldn’t text it down to twenty words; others say it’s not for us today because we’re far more up with the political play; and then there are those today who extol it to divert our attention away from the fact that they’re fiddling the books behind our backs. 21 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Against Written Constitutionalism (238.81 MB)
Wednesday, 15 July 2015
Professor Jim Allan is the Garrick Professor of Law at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland and previously belonged to the University of Otago Faculty of Law for 11 years. In this talk Professor Allan discusses four key points, what an unwritten constitution amounts to, the point of written constitutionalism and what you are being promised when offered a written constitution. Finally he explains why a written constitution has limited choice and the process of making a decision between a written and unwritten constitution. 15 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Against Written Constitutionalism (82.18 MB)
Wednesday, 15 July 2015
Professor Jim Allan is the Garrick Professor of Law at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland and previously belonged to the University of Otago Faculty of Law for 11 years. In this talk Professor Allan discusses four key points, what an unwritten constitution amounts to, the point of written constitutionalism and what you are being promised when offered a written constitution. Finally he explains why a written constitution has limited choice and the process of making a decision between a written and unwritten constitution. 15 July 2015

Meet the 2015 Otago Fellows (86.93 MB)
Sunday, 12 July 2015
The 2015 University of Otago Fellows: Louise Wallace (Robert Burns Fellow), John Ward Knox (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Uzoamaka Nwankpa (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Robyn Belton (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. Jennifer Beck who is sharing the University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence, was unable to attend. 12 July 2015

Meet the 2015 Otago Fellows (307.71 MB)
Sunday, 12 July 2015
The 2015 University of Otago Fellows: Louise Wallace (Robert Burns Fellow), John Ward Knox (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Uzoamaka Nwankpa (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Robyn Belton (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. Jennifer Beck who is sharing the University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence, was unable to attend. 12 July 2015

NCPACS & CTPI: Non-Toxic Religion: The Churches in the Peace Movement in 1980’s New Zealand (188.16 MB)
Thursday, 28 May 2015
Reverend Dr Peter Matheson studied in Otago, (History) Edinburgh, and Tübingen (Theology); edited Critic and taught religious history in New College Edinburgh, Otago and Melbourne. He has been active in the peace movement in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Germany and New Zealand and is the author of fifteen books and countless articles on reforming movements, radical and women's history in the Early Modern Period in Germany, and on aspects of New Zealand and Third Reich history. He is a Presbyterian minister and Honorary Fellow of the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Otago. In this talk, he discusses the churches in the peace movement in 1980’s New Zealand. 28 May 2015

NCPACS & CTPI: Non-Toxic Religion: The Churches in the Peace Movement in 1980’s New Zealand (55.84 MB)
Thursday, 28 May 2015
Reverend Dr Peter Matheson studied in Otago, (History) Edinburgh, and Tübingen (Theology); edited Critic and taught religious history in New College Edinburgh, Otago and Melbourne. He has been active in the peace movement in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Germany and New Zealand and is the author of fifteen books and countless articles on reforming movements, radical and women's history in the Early Modern Period in Germany, and on aspects of New Zealand and Third Reich history. He is a Presbyterian minister and Honorary Fellow of the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Otago. In this talk, he discusses the churches in the peace movement in 1980’s New Zealand. 28 May 2015

NCPACS: Heart and mind in the quest for justice and peace (362.32 MB)
Wednesday, 20 May 2015
Professor Peter Matheson has led a rich life of theological and historical scholarship, reflection, pastoral care and radical activism. He has urged Churches and States in the UK, Germany and New Zealand to confront violence and war and to work for peace, justice and a more compassionate world while also engaging many of the major issues of the 20th century. In this talk with Professor Kevin Clements, he discusses his life growing up, his experiences in peacemaking and the heart and mind in the quest for justice. 20 May 2015

NCPACS: Heart and mind in the quest for justice and peace (67.41 MB)
Wednesday, 20 May 2015
Professor Peter Matheson has led a rich life of theological and historical scholarship, reflection, pastoral care and radical activism. He has urged Churches and States in the UK, Germany and New Zealand to confront violence and war and to work for peace, justice and a more compassionate world while also engaging with many of the major issues of the 20th century. In this talk with Professor Kevin Clements, he discusses his life growing up, his experiences in peacemaking and the heart and mind in the quest for justice. 20 May 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation with Kennedy Graham, Green Party MP (219.74 MB)
Wednesday, 13 May 2015
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Dr Kennedy Graham discusses the subject of 'Human Security and Global Order: A 21st Century Agenda'. Kennedy Graham served in the New Zealand Foreign Service for 16 years, and has lectured on International Politics and International Law at both the University of Canterbury and Victoria University. He was elected to Parliament for the Greens in 2008 and re-elected in 2011, and holds portfolios of Global Affairs, Defence and Disarmament, and Constitutional Affairs. 13 May 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation with Kennedy Graham, Green Party MP (68.37 MB)
Wednesday, 13 May 2015
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Dr Kennedy Graham discusses the subject of 'Human Security and Global Order: A 21st Century Agenda'. Kennedy Graham served in the New Zealand Foreign Service for 16 years, and has lectured on International Politics and International Law at both the University of Canterbury and Victoria University. He was elected to Parliament for the Greens in 2008 and re-elected in 2011, and holds portfolios of Global Affairs, Defence and Disarmament, and Constitutional Affairs. 13 May 2015

IPL: Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history (217.52 MB)
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
Professor Takashi Shogimen of the Department of History & Art History delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history”. 21 April 2015

IPL: Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history (66.28 MB)
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
Professor Takashi Shogimen of the Department of History & Art History delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history”. 21 April 2015

CTPI: Faith and Reconciliation: Insights from the South African Experience (140.82 MB)
Thursday, 16 April 2015
Piet Meiring, Emeritus Professor of Theology and Missiology at the University of Pretoria, and a former member of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission chaired by Desmond Tutu, speaks about the role of faith and theology in the post-apartheid reconciliation process, and offers insights from the South African experience. 16 April 2015

CTPI: Faith and Reconciliation: Insights from the South African Experience (65.17 MB)
Thursday, 16 April 2015
Piet Meiring, Emeritus Professor of Theology and Missiology at the University of Pretoria, and a former member of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission chaired by Desmond Tutu, speaks about the role of faith and theology in the post-apartheid reconciliation process, and offers insights from the South African experience. 16 April 2015

NCPACS: What constitutes a hero? A discussion with author Linda Hansen (43.45 MB)
Wednesday, 15 April 2015
Linda Hansen is a New Zealand author and professional storyteller whose most recent book, “An Unexpected Hero” tells of a young boy’s encounter with the story of Archibald Baxter and the other conscientious objectors in World War I. Linda has worked extensively in the communications industry, as a lecturer and trainer and in this seminar, aims to challenge participants to reflect on what constitutes a hero. 15 April 2015

Faculty of Law: Advocacy to Expand Autonomy at the End of Life in the US: Evolving Law, Medicine and Policy (51.40 MB)
Tuesday, 17 March 2015
Professor Kathryn Tucker, Executive Director of The Disability Rights Legal Center, Los Angeles, discusses the rights of terminally ill patients to make choices to ensure a dying process that is consistent with their values and beliefs; these rights have been rapidly evolving in the US. Professor Tucker, a veteran of nearly every effort to protect and expand end of life choice in the US for more that two decades, will share insight on advocacy strategies, progress, challenges and predictions. She also discusses advocacy in the courthouse, the statehouse and in various policy forums. 17 March 2015

Faculty of Law: Advocacy to Expand Autonomy at the End of Life in the US: Evolving Law, Medicine and Policy (96.56 MB)
Tuesday, 17 March 2015
Professor Kathryn Tucker, Executive Director of The Disability Rights Legal Center, Los Angeles, discusses the rights of terminally ill patients to make choices to ensure a dying process that is consistent with their values and beliefs; these rights have been rapidly evolving in the US. Professor Tucker, a veteran of nearly every effort to protect and expand end of life choice in the US for more that two decades, will share insight on advocacy strategies, progress, challenges and predictions. She also discusses advocacy in the courthouse, the statehouse and in various policy forums. 17 March 2015

Faculty of Law: Global Animal Law and New Project (113.27 MB)
Monday, 16 March 2015
In this talk, Sabine Brels explores these questions in providing a global overview of animal law at three levels: National, European and International. What is animal law, where does it come from, and how is it evolving? Why can we say that it is progressing worldwide? What are its main strengths and weaknesses in order to protect the welfare of animals against cruelty and suffering, either legally or illegally perpetrated? She also looks at current efforts to set up a universal protection of animal welfare. Lastly, she presents the new Global Animal Law (GAL) Project, aiming to improve the law for animals all around the world. 16 March 2015

Faculty of Law: Global Animal Law and New Project (53.12 MB)
Monday, 16 March 2015
In this talk, Sabine Brels explores these questions in providing a global overview of animal law at three levels: National, European and International. What is animal law, where does it come from, and how is it evolving? Why can we say that it is progressing worldwide? What are its main strengths and weaknesses in order to protect the welfare of animals against cruelty and suffering, either legally or illegally perpetrated? She also looks at current efforts to set up a universal protection of animal welfare. Lastly, she presents the new Global Animal Law (GAL) Project, aiming to improve the law for animals all around the world. 16 March 2015

Matariki Humanities Colloquium 2014: Communicating the Humanities: a perspective from the University of Otago (204.27 MB)
Monday, 8 December 2014
This lecture, given by Professor Tony Ballantyne, Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, explores some of the challenges and opportunities that are facing scholars in the Humanities in New Zealand. It is particularly concerned with questions of communication, from the classroom to policy debates, from the changing infrastructure for publication and review to questions of language itself. In exploring these issues, it argues for the continued importance of some key aspects of the traditional idea of the University (especially 'the lecture'), makes the case for a much more co-ordinated drive to make Humanities research accessible and also identifies some significant ways forward for the Humanities in New Zealand in a 'digital age'. 8 December 2014

Matariki Humanities Colloquium 2014: Communicating the Humanities: a perspective from the University of Otago (74.49 MB)
Monday, 8 December 2014
This lecture, given by Professor Tony Ballantyne, Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, explores some of the challenges and opportunities that are facing scholars in the Humanities in New Zealand. It is particularly concerned with questions of communication, from the classroom to policy debates, from the changing infrastructure for publication and review to questions of language itself. In exploring these issues, it argues for the continued importance of some key aspects of the traditional idea of the University (especially 'the lecture'), makes the case for a much more co-ordinated drive to make Humanities research accessible and also identifies some significant ways forward for the Humanities in New Zealand in a 'digital age'. 8 December 2014

NCPACS: A Rights Based Approach to Food Security: An Urgent Challenge (146.62 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
Professor Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on Right to Food, evaluates the human rights based approach in relation to the right to adequate and healthy food given the reality and impact of the political, environmental and economic challenges of the 21st century. Professor Elver discusses the strong resistance by global market forces to rights based approach to food security as it supposedly interferes with free market principles; and moreover, the right to food as embedded in the Covenant of the Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights is not taken nearly as seriously by many developed countries as is the companion treaty, Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. 10 November 2014

NCPACS: Prospects for Peace in the Middle East (68.41 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
In 2008, despite active opposition from Jewish groups, the United Nations Human Rights Council appointed Professor Richard Falk to a six-year term as a United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. Professor Falk, Emeritus Professor of International Law at Princeton University, is described as ‘a critical analyst of the role of international law in global politics’. In this talk he discusses prospects for peace in the Middle East. 10 November 2014

NCPACS: Prospects for Peace in the Middle East (175.23 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
In 2008, despite active opposition from Jewish groups, the United Nations Human Rights Council appointed Professor Richard Falk to a six-year term as a United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. Professor Falk, Emeritus Professor of International Law at Princeton University, is described as ‘a critical analyst of the role of international law in global politics’. In this talk he discusses prospects for peace in the Middle East. 10 November 2014

NCPACS: A Rights Based Approach to Food Security: An Urgent Challenge (38.67 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
Professor Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on Right to Food, evaluates the human rights based approach in relation to the right to adequate and healthy food given the reality and impact of the political, environmental and economic challenges of the 21st century. Professor Elver discusses the strong resistance by global market forces to rights based approach to food security as it supposedly interferes with free market principles; and moreover, the right to food as embedded in the Covenant of the Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights is not taken nearly as seriously by many developed countries as is the companion treaty, Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. 10 November 2014

Faculty of Law: From Hypatia to Victor Hugo to Larry and Sergey: “All the world’s knowledge” and Universal Authors’ Rights (118.32 MB)
Thursday, 23 October 2014
Professor Jane C. Ginsburg of the Columbia University School of Law discusses two utopian goals: universal access to knowledge, and universal authors’ rights. She also addresses the clash of utopias epitomised by the Google book-scanning programme and the legal responses it has inspired, including the recent decision by the SDNY upholding Google’s fair use defence. 23 October 2014

Faculty of Law: From Hypatia to Victor Hugo to Larry and Sergey: “All the world’s knowledge” and Universal Authors’ Rights (57.19 MB)
Thursday, 23 October 2014
Professor Jane C. Ginsburg of the Columbia University School of Law discusses two utopian goals: universal access to knowledge, and universal authors’ rights. She also addresses the clash of utopias epitomised by the Google book-scanning programme and the legal responses it has inspired, including the recent decision by the SDNY upholding Google’s fair use defence. 23 October 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana campaign (86.44 MB)
Monday, 20 October 2014
In this conversation, panellists Claire Carey, Gregor Morgan and Allan Cumming join Professor Kevin Clements to discuss the role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana Campaign and the lessons for other communities around the world. 20 October 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana campaign (438.04 MB)
Monday, 20 October 2014
In this conversation, panellists Claire Carey, Gregor Morgan and Allan Cumming join Professor Kevin Clements to discuss the role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana Campaign and the lessons for other communities around the world. 20 October 2014

CTPI: 2014 Quaker Lecture: Standing in this Place (73.36 MB)
Friday, 17 October 2014
In Aotearoa New Zealand many Quakers have been involved in supporting, in diverse ways, the achievement of Maori self-determination, or tino rangatiratanga, as guaranteed by Te Tiriti o Waitangi. In this lecture David James, Jillian Wychel, Murray Short and Linda Wilson, reflect on their own experiences working as allies with Maori. The term working as allies has been used by author Jen Margaret to describe ways that non-indigenous persons work for and support justice for indigenous peoples. Together these four Quakers explore opportunities for Pakeha to work for justice for indigenous people through political and social change in very different ways on a day-to-day basis. 17 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Compared to What? (196.39 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the fourth and final lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Compared to What? The basic argument is that comparative literature grew from interdisciplinarity in the late eighteenth/early nineteenth centuries, struggled to become an autonomous field and in the process lost its interdisciplinary dimensions, then has been recovering them on new bases, but in an academic environment that is slow to reward risk-taking, unlike the moment immediately after the French Revolution when the gesture of sweeping the slate clean and inventing new sciences came naturally to so many of our predecessors. 10 October 2014

CCCS: Comparison and Ethics (64.81 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Through discussion of the conceptual metaphor of facing a crossroads, Professor Zhang Longxi of City University of Hong Kong will first establish the necessity of comparison in a general sense, and then will use another conceptual metaphor of killing a Chinese mandarin to explore the ethics of comparison, the issue of the relationship with one’s own group versus relationship, or the lack of it, with outsiders and strangers. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the physical and psychological distance of human beings from one another is shrinking, and so is the possibility of moral indifference toward others outside one’s own group. This talk is sponsored by the University of Otago Research Theme for Cross-Cultural and Comparative Studies. 10 October 2014

CCCS: Comparison and Ethics (155.26 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Through discussion of the conceptual metaphor of facing a crossroads, Professor Zhang Longxi of City University of Hong Kong will first establish the necessity of comparison in a general sense, and then will use another conceptual metaphor of killing a Chinese mandarin to explore the ethics of comparison, the issue of the relationship with one’s own group versus relationship, or the lack of it, with outsiders and strangers. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the physical and psychological distance of human beings from one another is shrinking, and so is the possibility of moral indifference toward others outside one’s own group. This talk is sponsored by the University of Otago Research Theme for Cross-Cultural and Comparative Studies. 10 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Compared to What? (77.86 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the fourth and final lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Compared to What? The basic argument is that comparative literature grew from interdisciplinarity in the late eighteenth/early nineteenth centuries, struggled to become an autonomous field and in the process lost its interdisciplinary dimensions, then has been recovering them on new bases, but in an academic environment that is slow to reward risk-taking, unlike the moment immediately after the French Revolution when the gesture of sweeping the slate clean and inventing new sciences came naturally to so many of our predecessors. 10 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: History-Writing and Moral Community in China (85.72 MB)
Thursday, 2 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the third lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, History-Writing and Moral Community in China. The Chinese claim, seen with increasing frequency in current soft-power propaganda campaigns, of "5000 years of history" needs to be read in light of a process, over 2000 years long itself, of consensus-building by, of and for historians. How does such a thing as the Chinese Empire become, first an imaginary solution, then an inescapable reality, for a large part of humanity? The arts of rhetorical reading help us to see the successive articulations of what we now know as "China" or "Zhongguo." 2 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: History-Writing and Moral Community in China (237.14 MB)
Thursday, 2 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the third lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, History-Writing and Moral Community in China. The Chinese claim, seen with increasing frequency in current soft-power propaganda campaigns, of "5000 years of history" needs to be read in light of a process, over 2000 years long itself, of consensus-building by, of and for historians. How does such a thing as the Chinese Empire become, first an imaginary solution, then an inescapable reality, for a large part of humanity? The arts of rhetorical reading help us to see the successive articulations of what we now know as "China" or "Zhongguo." 2 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Doctoring the State: Plato, Hobbes, Humboldt, Hegel, Virchow (46.44 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the second lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series. Western political philosophy, at its beginning (Plato's Republic), introduces an analogy between medical treatment and political reform that, like all metaphors, has consequences on both the supposedly different domains that it incorporates. As long as the metaphor is viewed as a mere analogy, however, the practical relation of medicine to state survival is obscured. The historical development, through a series of political theorists, some of them physicians, explains the in-between status of the field of public health. 22 September 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Doctoring the State: Plato, Hobbes, Humboldt, Hegel, Virchow (143.44 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the second lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series. Western political philosophy, at its beginning (Plato's Republic), introduces an analogy between medical treatment and political reform that, like all metaphors, has consequences on both the supposedly different domains that it incorporates. As long as the metaphor is viewed as a mere analogy, however, the practical relation of medicine to state survival is obscured. The historical development, through a series of political theorists, some of them physicians, explains the in-between status of the field of public health. 22 September 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction (242.01 MB)
Thursday, 18 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the first lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction. Though it has become part of our common-sense understanding, the idea of a deep and comprehensive difference between the ways of thinking in predominantly oral and predominantly written cultures dates to the early twentieth century, at the most, and received its impetus from polemics now largely forgotten. By retracing this history, we can work out a genealogy for media studies that will accommodate a larger definition of the human. 18 September 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction (89.58 MB)
Thursday, 18 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the first lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction. Though it has become part of our common-sense understanding, the idea of a deep and comprehensive difference between the ways of thinking in predominantly oral and predominantly written cultures dates to the early twentieth century, at the most, and received its impetus from polemics now largely forgotten. By retracing this history, we can work out a genealogy for media studies that will accommodate a larger definition of the human. 18 September 2014

NCPACS: Guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand (140.41 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
In this conversation Tim Ashton, a former member of the Armed Offenders and Special Tactics group in the New Zealand Police force, talks with Professor Kevin Clements about guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand. In 1990 Tim was one of the Special Tactics team that shot David Gray in Aramoana. Over the course of his career he has been involved in many incidents where offenders have taken their own lives after killing others, including partners and children. Tim has been shot in the course of his duty and has received two medals for bravery. 15 September 2014

NCPACS: Guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand (61.79 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
In this conversation Tim Ashton, a former member of the Armed Offenders and Special Tactics group in the New Zealand Police force, talks with Professor Kevin Clements about guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand. In 1990 Tim was one of the Special Tactics team that shot David Gray in Aramoana. Over the course of his career he has been involved in many incidents where offenders have taken their own lives after killing others, including partners and children. Tim has been shot in the course of his duty and has received two medals for bravery. 15 September 2014

Dr Robin Jackson: “Messy, debatable and unquantifiable”: Championing the Humanities (89.65 MB)
Monday, 8 September 2014
Dr Robin Jackson, Chief Executive and Secretary, British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences, gives a review of some of the challenges and issues that face Humanities in the USA and UK and possibly Australia/New Zealand too. He provides some reflections on the nature of the study of the Humanities which might explain why those challenges arise; and an illustration of various ways in which they can be addressed. 8 September 2014

Dr Robin Jackson: “Messy, debatable and unquantifiable”: Championing the Humanities (227.41 MB)
Monday, 8 September 2014
Dr Robin Jackson, Chief Executive and Secretary, British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences, gives a review of some of the challenges and issues that face Humanities in the USA and UK and possibly Australia/New Zealand too. He provides some reflections on the nature of the study of the Humanities which might explain why those challenges arise; and an illustration of various ways in which they can be addressed. 8 September 2014

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2014 – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court (49.33 MB)
Thursday, 4 September 2014
Trevor Shiels QC, delivers the 2014 F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court. 4 September 2014

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2014 – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court (98.63 MB)
Thursday, 4 September 2014
Trevor Shiels QC, delivers the 2014 F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court. 4 September 2014

IPL: Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning (69.58 MB)
Tuesday, 2 September 2014
Professor Tony Harland, Head of the Higher Education Development Centre, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning”. 2 September 2014

IPL: Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning (180.76 MB)
Tuesday, 2 September 2014
Professor Tony Harland, Head of the Higher Education Development Centre, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning”. 2 September 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Relationality, Simultaneity, Multiplicity: Theorizing Structures and Flows in Asia (37.13 MB)
Tuesday, 26 August 2014
Devanathan Parthasarathy, Professor of Sociology at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India, presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. Inspired by Doreen Massey’s critique of multiplicity and power-geometry, and Indian anthropological critiques of village studies and urban studies, this talk uses a series of ethnographic illustrations to innovate our ways of comprehending relationality, connectedness, simultaneity, and multiplicity in empirical analysis and theorization of migration, mobility and flows across temporal and spatial units and scales. 26 August 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Relationality, Simultaneity, Multiplicity: Theorizing Structures and Flows in Asia (71.20 MB)
Tuesday, 26 August 2014
Devanathan Parthasarathy, Professor of Sociology at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India, presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. Inspired by Doreen Massey’s critique of multiplicity and power-geometry, and Indian anthropological critiques of village studies and urban studies, this talk uses a series of ethnographic illustrations to innovate our ways of comprehending relationality, connectedness, simultaneity, and multiplicity in empirical analysis and theorization of migration, mobility and flows across temporal and spatial units and scales. 26 August 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Circular Migration and Theatres of Accumulation (50.57 MB)
Monday, 25 August 2014
Eric C. Thompson, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Singapore presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. The presentation examines the city as a theatre of accumulation not from the top-down but rather from the bottom-up, that is from the point-of-view of rural-to-urban and transnational migrants for whom cities are sites to accumulate financial as well as social and cultural capital in order to fulfil their own aspirations. Importantly, drawing on examples from Bangkok and Singapore, the site of those aspirations is often elsewhere – not in the city but “back home” in rural areas or other countries. 25 August 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Circular Migration and Theatres of Accumulation (115.05 MB)
Monday, 25 August 2014
Eric C. Thompson, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Singapore presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. The presentation examines the city as a theatre of accumulation not from the top-down but rather from the bottom-up, that is from the point-of-view of rural-to-urban and transnational migrants for whom cities are sites to accumulate financial as well as social and cultural capital in order to fulfil their own aspirations. Importantly, drawing on examples from Bangkok and Singapore, the site of those aspirations is often elsewhere – not in the city but “back home” in rural areas or other countries. 25 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (124.15 MB)
Thursday, 21 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture six, and the final of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Jerusalem”. 21 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (52.65 MB)
Thursday, 21 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture six, and the final of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Jerusalem”. 21 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (153.63 MB)
Wednesday, 20 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture five of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Sons of Thunder”. 20 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (53.90 MB)
Wednesday, 20 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture five of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Sons of Thunder”. 20 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (123.87 MB)
Tuesday, 19 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture four of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Called to Fish for People”. 19 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (47.55 MB)
Tuesday, 19 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture four of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Called to Fish for People”. 19 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (102.66 MB)
Thursday, 14 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Zebedee and Sons”. 14 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (56.94 MB)
Thursday, 14 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Zebedee and Sons”. 14 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (125.09 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The Fishing Industry”. 13 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (63.42 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The Fishing Industry”. 13 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Do they say what they mean and mean what they say? Some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century (88.37 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Honorable Justice Susan Glazebrook, Supreme Court of New Zealand, delivers this talk on some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century. Justice Glazebrook discusses a number of topics including legislation, modern statutes, the purpose of text in legislation, and interpretation. 13 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Do they say what they mean and mean what they say? Some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century (60.97 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Honorable Justice Susan Glazebrook, Supreme Court of New Zealand, delivers this talk on some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century. Justice Glazebrook discusses a number of topics including legislation, modern statutes, the purpose of text in legislation, and interpretation. 13 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (50.75 MB)
Tuesday, 12 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The World of the Lake of Galilee”. 12 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (94.05 MB)
Tuesday, 12 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The World of the Lake of Galilee”. 12 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Human Rights in North Korea. Can things change? (43.65 MB)
Tuesday, 5 August 2014
The Honorable Michael Kirby, AC CMG Australia, presents this talk on Human Rights in North Korea. He discusses a number of issues including the torture of prisoners and other violations of human rights. He also discusses the establishment of the Commission of Enquiry in May 2013 to investigate these issues. 5 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Human Rights in North Korea. Can things change? (128.46 MB)
Tuesday, 5 August 2014
The Honorable Michael Kirby, AC CMG Australia, presents this talk on Human Rights in North Korea. He discusses a number of issues including the torture of prisoners and other violations of human rights. He also discusses the establishment of the Commission of Enquiry in May 2013 to investigate these issues. 5 August 2014

NCPACS – Remembering Hiroshima: Targeting civilians in war (60.39 MB)
Tuesday, 5 August 2014
The Second World War blurred the distinction between civilians and combatants, thus eliminating one of the central planks of just war theory. Hiroshima reinforced this trend with indiscriminate slaughter of civilians on an industrial scale. Professor Kevin Clements, NCPACS, Dr Yuko Shibata, Languages & Cultures, Professor Robert Patman, Politics, Professor Richard Jackson, NCPACS and Ria Shibata, PhD candidate, NCPACS will explore ways in which innocent civilians have been intentionally and unintentionally targeted in all subsequent modern wars. The forum will discuss current conflicts in the context of Hiroshima. 5 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Litigating Climate Change (53.08 MB)
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Professor Gerald Torres, Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law at Cornell Law School delivers this talk on 'Litigating Climate Change'. Climate change cases are already being handled by the USA courts. The most prominent are the atmospheric trust cases currently being brought by youth and supported by James Hansen and other scientists. These cases are asking the courts to compel Government to take meaningful action to protect the atmosphere for current and future generations. There have also been liability suits suggested – and at least one filed – over the effects of climate change. Professor Torres discusses the range of cases being brought and suggested in the USA, focusing on the atmospheric trust litigation, and the public trust doctrine which underlies it. 30 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Litigating Climate Change (179.97 MB)
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Professor Gerald Torres, Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law at Cornell Law School delivers this talk on 'Litigating Climate Change'. Climate change cases are already being handled by the USA courts. The most prominent are the atmospheric trust cases currently being brought by youth and supported by James Hansen and other scientists. These cases are asking the courts to compel Government to take meaningful action to protect the atmosphere for current and future generations. There have also been liability suits suggested – and at least one filed – over the effects of climate change. Professor Torres discusses the range of cases being brought and suggested in the USA, focusing on the atmospheric trust litigation, and the public trust doctrine which underlies it. 30 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Legal Transplant: Lost in Translation or a Working Misunderstanding (45.08 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Guest Lecturer Mindy Chen-Wishart, a Reader in Contract Law, presents a case study of the transplant of an English doctrine into Singaporean law and explores why the Singaporean courts, while professing to follow it, have applied it to very divergent effect. She compares Western and Confucian value systems—hierarchy versus equality, the positional versus the personal, and collectivism versus individualism—and emphasises the importance of being more aware of the deeply entrenched assumptions of one's own legal system, and of those of other cultures. With the 'changing of the guard' on the world stage, from the West to the East, this is a particularly important time to engage with the Eastern perspective. 24 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Legal Transplant: Lost in Translation or a Working Misunderstanding (130.64 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Guest Lecturer Mindy Chen-Wishart, a Reader in Contract Law, presents a case study of the transplant of an English doctrine into Singaporean law and explores why the Singaporean courts, while professing to follow it, have applied it to very divergent effect. She compares Western and Confucian value systems—hierarchy versus equality, the positional versus the personal, and collectivism versus individualism—and emphasises the importance of being more aware of the deeply entrenched assumptions of one's own legal system, and of those of other cultures. With the 'changing of the guard' on the world stage, from the West to the East, this is a particularly important time to engage with the Eastern perspective. 24 July 2014

NCPACS and Politics: 2014 Voting Debate: Is it worth voting? (90.25 MB)
Wednesday, 23 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements chairs this debate on the subject ‘Is it worth voting?’ in light of the upcoming election in September. Dr David Clark, MP Dunedin North and Marian Hobbs, former Labour MP, debate the positive argument. Professor Richard Jackson and Dr Bryce Edwards, debate the negative argument. 23 July 2014

NCPACS and Politics: 2014 Voting Debate: Is it worth voting? (392.59 MB)
Wednesday, 23 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements chairs this debate on the subject ‘Is it worth voting?’ in light of the upcoming election in September. Dr David Clark, MP Dunedin North and Marian Hobbs, former Labour MP, debate the positive argument. Professor Richard Jackson and Dr Bryce Edwards, debate the negative argument. 23 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Marilyn Waring (342.94 MB)
Monday, 21 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements talks to Marilyn Waring, development consultant, academic, writer and former National Party MP who triggered the 1984 snap election when she refused to support her own government in the vote against an opposition-sponsored anti-nuclear bill. Her best known work, "If Women Counted", also published under the title "Counting for Nothing", describes how economic orthodoxies exclude most of women's productive and reproductive work. In this conversation, Professor Clements seeks to explore what triggered Marilyn's interest in peace, justice and human rights. 21 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Marilyn Waring (103.87 MB)
Monday, 21 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements talks to Marilyn Waring, development consultant, academic, writer and former National Party MP who triggered the 1984 snap election when she refused to support her own government in the vote against an opposition-sponsored anti-nuclear bill. Her best known work, "If Women Counted", also published under the title "Counting for Nothing", describes how economic orthodoxies exclude most of women's productive and reproductive work. In this conversation, Professor Clements seeks to explore what triggered Marilyn's interest in peace, justice and human rights. 21 July 2014

Meet the 2014 Otago Fellows (63.47 MB)
Sunday, 13 July 2014
The 2014 University of Otago Arts Fellows: Majella Cullinane (Robert Burns Fellow), Patrick Lundberg (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Louise Potiki Bryant (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Melinda Szymanik (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children's Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. 13 July 2014

Meet the 2014 Otago Fellows (198.97 MB)
Sunday, 13 July 2014
The 2014 University of Otago Arts Fellows: Majella Cullinane (Robert Burns Fellow), Patrick Lundberg (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Louise Potiki Bryant (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Melinda Szymanik (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children's Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. 13 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Religious Freedom: managing the tension between faith and equality in a multicultural society (51.67 MB)
Thursday, 10 July 2014
Professor Patrick Parkinson is a professor of law at the University of Sydney and a specialist in family law, child protection and the law of equity and trusts. He is President of the International Society of Family Law and has written many books. In this talk he discusses the conflict between faith organisations and human rights centre advocates after so many years of coexistence and collaboration. He also goes on to discuss his examinations into finding the balance between equality norms and religious freedom in a multicultural society, and the issue of public funding for religious organisations. 10 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Religious Freedom: managing the tension between faith and equality in a multicultural society (172.53 MB)
Thursday, 10 July 2014
Professor Patrick Parkinson is a professor of law at the University of Sydney and a specialist in family law, child protection and the law of equity and trusts. He is President of the International Society of Family Law and has written many books. In this talk he discusses the conflict between faith organisations and human rights centre advocates after so many years of coexistence and collaboration. He also goes on to discuss his examinations into finding the balance between equality norms and religious freedom in a multicultural society, and the issue of public funding for religious organisations. 10 July 2014

English & Linguistics: Poetry Reading with Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten at Circadian Rhythm Café (211.45 MB)
Wednesday, 9 July 2014
Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten give poetry readings at the Circadian Rhythm Café. Carla Harryman is a poet, essayist, novelist, and playwright. She has published thirteen single-authored works, including 'Adorno's Noise' (Essay Press, 2008) and 'Open Box' (Belladonna, 2007), and has received numerous grants and awards including from the Foundation for Contemporary Art, Opera America, the American Embassy in Romania, and the Fund for Poetry. Barrett Watten is a language-centered poet, critic, editor, and publisher. Some of his publications include 'Bad History', a nonnarrative prose poem “including history,” (Atelos, 1998) and ''Progress/Under Erasure, in a combined edition, (Green Integer,2004). He edited 'This', one of the central publications of the Language school of poetry (1971-82), and co-edited 'Poetics Journal' with Lyn Hejinian, featuring writing on poetics by poets and academics. 9 July 2014

English & Linguistics: Poetry Reading with Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten (73.21 MB)
Wednesday, 9 July 2014
Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten give poetry readings at the Circadian Rhythm Café. Carla Harryman is a poet, essayist, novelist, and playwright. She has published thirteen single-authored works, including 'Adorno's Noise' (Essay Press, 2008) and 'Open Box' (Belladonna, 2007), and has received numerous grants and awards including from the Foundation for Contemporary Art, Opera America, the American Embassy in Romania, and the Fund for Poetry. Barrett Watten is a language-centered poet, critic, editor, and publisher. Some of his publications include 'Bad History', a nonnarrative prose poem “including history,” (Atelos, 1998) and ''Progress/Under Erasure, in a combined edition, (Green Integer,2004). He edited 'This', one of the central publications of the Language school of poetry (1971-82), and co-edited 'Poetics Journal' with Lyn Hejinian, featuring writing on poetics by poets and academics. 9 July 2014

IPL: Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps (127.33 MB)
Tuesday, 8 July 2014
Professor Sean Fitzsimons of the Department of Geography delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps”. 8 July 2014

IPL: Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps (53.71 MB)
Tuesday, 8 July 2014
Professor Sean Fitzsimons of the Department of Geography delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps”. 8 July 2014

Peace Lecture 2014: Believers of the world - unite (51.58 MB)
Monday, 7 July 2014
Rev Dr Lord Leslie Griffiths presents this year's Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group Peace lecture “Believers of the world – unite”. Dr Griffiths, the Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, is a Methodist Minister and Superintendent of Wesley’s Chapel, London, and has been a member of the British House of Lords since 2004. His story begins in real poverty in South Wales. He became the youngest ever staff member at the University of Wales, before the call to ordained ministry led him, via Cambridge, to Haiti to work with some of the poorest people on earth. 7 July 2014

Peace Lecture 2014: Believers of the world - unite (142.39 MB)
Monday, 7 July 2014
Rev Dr Lord Leslie Griffiths presents this year's Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group Peace lecture “Believers of the world – unite”. Dr Griffiths, the Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, is a Methodist Minister and Superintendent of Wesley’s Chapel, London, and has been a member of the British House of Lords since 2004. His story begins in real poverty in South Wales. He became the youngest ever staff member at the University of Wales, before the call to ordained ministry led him, via Cambridge, to Haiti to work with some of the poorest people on earth. 7 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Ed Garcia with Professor Kevin Clements (218.76 MB)
Thursday, 26 June 2014
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Professor Ed Garcia will reflect on his life's work, on the central dilemmas confronting human rights and peace practitioners and the ethics of peacebuilding. Professor Ed Garcia is a Peace Process Practitioner. He has worked as a peaceworker, specifically as special peace envoy and senior policy advisor at International Alert, a peace-building organisation working in diverse regions of violent conflict. Ed's work has taken him all over Asia, including the Philippines, Indonesia, East Timor, Fiji, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Kashmir. He has worked in conflict zones on the African continent, in Latin America and the Middle East. 14 April 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Ed Garcia with Professor Kevin Clements (64.74 MB)
Thursday, 26 June 2014
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Professor Ed Garcia will reflect on his life's work, on the central dilemmas confronting human rights and peace practitioners and the ethics of peacebuilding. Professor Ed Garcia is a Peace Process Practitioner. He has worked as a peaceworker, specifically as special peace envoy and senior policy advisor at International Alert, a peace-building organisation working in diverse regions of violent conflict. Ed's work has taken him all over Asia, including the Philippines, Indonesia, East Timor, Fiji, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Kashmir. He has worked in conflict zones on the African continent, in Latin America and the Middle East. 14 April 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Professor Ed Garcia (89.47 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Before Professor Ed Garcia departed after an extended visit to the Centre, he interviewed Professor Kevin Clements about his life and times. Kevin has had an illustrious career both in academia and as a consultant to a variety of non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations on disarmament, arms control, conflict resolution, development and regional security issues. He has written widely on conflict transformation, peacebuilding, preventive diplomacy and development with a specific focus on the Asia Pacific region. 24 April 2014

NCPACS: Maata Wharehoka in conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (633.20 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Maata Wharehoka, a tikanga Maori advocate, discusses with Professor Kevin Clements about being born in the 1950’s into a large unwealthy family and her work as an activist and advocate. She talks about living a pakeha life with her aunty from the age of 11, her experiences through nursing school and studying, and raising her own family of five children, and the fostering of 45 children. 12 May 2014

NCPACS: Maata Wharehoka in conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (83.65 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Maata Wharehoka, a tikanga Maori advocate, discusses with Professor Kevin Clements about being born in the 1950’s into a large unwealthy family and her work as an activist and advocate. She talks about living a pakeha life with her aunty from the age of 11, her experiences through nursing school and studying, and raising her own family of five children, and the fostering of 45 children. 12 May 2014

Geography: Becoming an African Chief: 40 years of research and community involvement in Sierra Leone (208.45 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Professor Tony Binns, University of Otago Ron Lister Chair of Geography, has been bestowed with the most remarkable of honours – being named an African Chief. The Paramount Chief and Section Chiefs of Sandor Chiefdom in Kono District, Eastern Province, Sierra Leone, awarded Professor Binns the titles of ‘Sahr Kayima’ and ‘Chief Manjawah of Sandor’ earlier this year. The honour recognises his work and community involvement over a period of 40 years since he first visited as a PhD student in 1974. He explains his personal journey and how he became interested in Africa and specifically Sierra Leone. He discusses his ongoing research and links with the communities and the significance of the honorary chieftaincy. 11 June 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Professor Ed Garcia (216.89 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Before Professor Ed Garcia departed after an extended visit to the Centre, he interviewed Professor Kevin Clements about his life and times. Kevin has had an illustrious career both in academia and as a consultant to a variety of non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations on disarmament, arms control, conflict resolution, development and regional security issues. He has written widely on conflict transformation, peacebuilding, preventive diplomacy and development with a specific focus on the Asia Pacific region. 24 April 2014

Geography: Becoming an African Chief: 40 years of research and community involvement in Sierra Leone (67.53 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Professor Tony Binns, University of Otago Ron Lister Chair of Geography, has been bestowed with the most remarkable of honours – being named an African Chief. The Paramount Chief and Section Chiefs of Sandor Chiefdom in Kono District, Eastern Province, Sierra Leone, awarded Professor Binns the titles of ‘Sahr Kayima’ and ‘Chief Manjawah of Sandor’ earlier this year. The honour recognises his work and community involvement over a period of 40 years since he first visited as a PhD student in 1974. He explains his personal journey and how he became interested in Africa and specifically Sierra Leone. He discusses his ongoing research and links with the communities and the significance of the honorary chieftaincy. 11 June 2014

CTPI: Child Poverty: Myths, Misconceptions and Misunderstandings (56.99 MB)
Thursday, 12 June 2014
Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy at VUW, Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Co-chair, Expert Advisory Group (2012) on Solutions to Child Poverty discusses the issue of child poverty: myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings. In discussions about child poverty in New Zealand, one often hears the following claims: ‘There is little or no real child poverty in this country’; ‘The fundamental problem is that some people have too many children’; ‘Many parents are lazy or irresponsible and thus deserve to be poor’; ‘The real problem is not poverty but poor parenting’; ‘We can’t afford to reduce child poverty’; and ‘If we give the poor more money, they will simply waste it’. How valid are such claims? What does the available empirical evidence tell us? What can we learn from the experience of other developed countries? And what ethical principles should guide our policy responses to the challenge of child poverty? 12 June 2014

CTPI: Child Poverty: Myths, Misconceptions and Misunderstandings (137.67 MB)
Thursday, 12 June 2014
Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy at VUW, Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Co-chair, Expert Advisory Group (2012) on Solutions to Child Poverty discusses the issue of child poverty: myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings. In discussions about child poverty in New Zealand, one often hears the following claims: ‘There is little or no real child poverty in this country’; ‘The fundamental problem is that some people have too many children’; ‘Many parents are lazy or irresponsible and thus deserve to be poor’; ‘The real problem is not poverty but poor parenting’; ‘We can’t afford to reduce child poverty’; and ‘If we give the poor more money, they will simply waste it’. How valid are such claims? What does the available empirical evidence tell us? What can we learn from the experience of other developed countries? And what ethical principles should guide our policy responses to the challenge of child poverty? 12 June 2014

Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies: An Evening with Adrian McKinty (102.27 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
In this address, we hear the prize-winning author of Fifty Grand and The Cold Cold Ground, Adrian McKinty, read from his new Sean Duffy novel, In the Morning I’ll Be Gone. Adrian is an Irish novelist born in Belfast, Northern Ireland who is primarily known as a writer of crime and mystery novels, and young adult fiction. He is the author of 15 novels and has won a number of awards for his writing since he began in 2001 and has been shortlisted for the Crimewriter’s Association silver dagger award, the Theakston Best British Crime Novel award and the Barry award. 30 April 2014

Faculty of Law: Democracy in Decline (206.85 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professor Jim Allan, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, argues that in five of the world’s oldest democracies, the long-established Anglosphere countries of Canada, New Zealand, the UK, the US and Australia, the past few decades have seen a decline in the extent to which democratic decision-making prevails. He outlines the causes of that decline in democracy and then notes the ways that decline is masked and obfuscated. 16 May 2014

Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies: An Evening with Adrian McKinty (39.56 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
In this address, we hear the prize-winning author of Fifty Grand and The Cold Cold Ground, Adrian McKinty, read from his new Sean Duffy novel, In the Morning I’ll Be Gone. Adrian is an Irish novelist born in Belfast, Northern Ireland who is primarily known as a writer of crime and mystery novels, and young adult fiction. He is the author of 15 novels and has won a number of awards for his writing since he began in 2001 and has been shortlisted for the Crimewriter’s Association silver dagger award, the Theakston Best British Crime Novel award and the Barry award. 30 April 2014

Faculty of Law: Democracy in Decline (54.27 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professor Jim Allan, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, argues that in five of the world’s oldest democracies, the long-established Anglosphere countries of Canada, New Zealand, the UK, the US and Australia, the past few decades have seen a decline in the extent to which democratic decision-making prevails. He outlines the causes of that decline in democracy and then notes the ways that decline is masked and obfuscated. 16 May 2014

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Why Study Humanities? "I like it and it's important Aunty!" (266.05 MB)
Wednesday, 14 December 2016
Professor Jon Hall, Classics, gives the graduation address at the Arts, Music and Theology graduation ceremony on 14 December 2016.

CTPI: Why Theology Matters to Tree Frogs (233.62 MB)
Sunday, 20 November 2016
A Public Lecture with Rev. Peter Harris, Anglican Minister, Conservationist, and Co-Founder of Christian Conservation Organisation A Rocha. 24 November 2016

CTPI & NCPACS: World Council of Churches' Response to Religious Violence (276.49 MB)
Friday, 7 October 2016
Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit addresses the World Council of Churches Central Committee’s recent ‘Statement on Religion and Violence’ (28 June 2016), which addresses the persistence and spread of extremist violence in the world, and its ambiguous connections with religion. 7 October 2016.

Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture: The politics of compassion in a world of ruthless power (155.65 MB)
Wednesday, 28 September 2016
Professor Kevin Clements delivers the 2016 Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture. 28 September 2016

IPL: Planning biodiverse cities for all ages (253.38 MB)
Tuesday, 20 September 2016
As an environmental planner, Claire Freeman’s research focuses on the intersection of the natural and built environment. She examines how environmental relationships can be enhanced through more effective planning policy, design and practice. In particular, she looks at how planning can help create urban environments that work better for children and young people, and for nature. It links across three major disciplinary fields; the social sciences, biological science and planning. Some current and recent projects she is involved with are: “Natural neighbourhoods for city children”, a Marsden-funded study exploring how children in Dunedin, Auckland and Wellington connect with nature in their daily lives; “the Dunedin Garden Study,” which investigates householders’ relationships with native biodiversity in their gardens; “Children and young people’s experiences following the Christchurch earthquake”; and a study of “Children’s experiences of neighbourhood” in New Zealand, Fiji and Kiribati. 20 September 2016

IPL: Toitū te Whenua, Toitū te Mana (168.27 MB)
Monday, 12 September 2016
In this Inaugural Professorial Lecture, Professor Jacinta Ruru anchors her research journey within this Māori proverb to help bring alive the endurance and 'foreverness' of the Māori world in Aotearoa. Professor Ruru shares the ways in which she has sought to contribute towards challenging the law to more respectfully recognise and embrace Indigenous peoples’ authority, laws, values, rights and responsibilities to own, govern and manage land and water. 12 September 2016

Theology and Religion: Towards an Ecumenical Political Theology: Charisms Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist (76.78 MB)
Tuesday, 6 September 2016
Rev Dr Doug Gay is the Stuart Residence Halls Council Distinguished Visitor for 2016. In this public lecture, he traces the outline of an ecumenical political theology incorporating the Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist traditions of narrative, discipline and witness, with particular reference to the political and economic environment and events leading to the post 2008 economic crisis. 6 September 2016.

National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies: Adam Curle Radical Peacemaker (23.33 MB)
Wednesday, 31 August 2016
Professor Kevin Clements gives a recorded presentation to the Adam Curle Symposium held at the University of Bradford

Peace Lecture 2016: Between Law and Spirituality – Islam’s legal basis for its spirit of peaceful coexistence (303.99 MB)
Wednesday, 24 August 2016
Imam Afroz Ali is the founder and president of Al-Ghazzali Centre for Islamic Sciences & Human Development in Sydney, Australia, and an Australian Ambassador for the Charter of Compassion. He is also is a founding member of the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change and served as managing director for SeekersHub Global. This is the 13th annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group. 24 August 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Graham Virgo - Conscience in Equity: a new Utopia (147.72 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Faculty of Law presents this public lecture by Professor Graham Virgo, 2016 NZ Law Foundation Distinguished Visiting Fellow, 2016 FW Guest Memorial Lecturer. In 1516 Sir Thomas More published 'Utopia', which identifies an attractive vision of law and society. As Lord Chancellor, More helped to develop Equity as a mechanism to secure justice which was not provided through the rigid interpretation of the Common Law. From the start, the equitable jurisdiction was founded on conscience. By tracing the historical development of conscience it is possible to identify the theoretical structure which justifies and explains the equitable jurisdiction and shows how it should develop in the future.

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 6 (141.79 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in Modern Literature'. 4 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 5 (175.84 MB)
Wednesday, 3 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job Through the Eyes of Artists'. 3 August 2016

IPL: Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development (143.84 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
Professor Etienne Nel of the Department of Geography, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development”. Etienne has authored, co-authored or edited 10 books, and has written nearly 30 book chapters and more than 100 articles, primarily on economic development in Africa. 2 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 4 (151.82 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job as a Contested Classic'. 2 August 2016

NCPACS: After Chilcot: The consequences of the Chilcot Report for armed intervention and war (189.00 MB)
Monday, 1 August 2016
This forum reflects on some of the global lessons to be learned from the Chilcot report. The report systematically and comprehensively demolishes Tony Blair and George Bush’s justifications for embroiling the UK in the most disastrous war of the modern era. It also raises some fundamental questions about international criminal accountability for acts of aggression and wider questions about where the responsibility for war should lie in Westminster-style democracies. The panel includes Professor Robert Patman (Politics), Associate Professor Lisa Ellis (Philosophy) and Mr Stephen Smith (Law), chaired by Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS). 1 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 3 (142.81 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Theological Conversations in Job'. 28 July 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Jeremy Waldron - Death lists and death squads: Targeted killing and the character of the State (154.83 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
'My intention in this lecture is to urge critical reflection upon current US practices of targeted killing by considering, not just whether acts of targeted killing can be legally justified, but also what sort of state we are turning into when we organize the use of lethal force in this way -maintaining a list of named enemies of the state who are to be eliminated in this way.' A prolific scholar, Jeremy Waldron teaches legal and political philosophy at NYU School of Law. Until recently, he was also Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory at Oxford University (All Souls College).

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 2 (188.33 MB)
Wednesday, 27 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'The Artistry of the (Hebrew) Book of Job'. 27 July 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 1 (148.84 MB)
Tuesday, 26 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in the Cradle of World Literature'. 26 July 2016

Meet the 2016 Otago Fellows (307.01 MB)
Sunday, 17 July 2016
The 2016 University of Otago Fellows: Victor Rodger (Robert Burns Fellow), Miranda Parkes (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Chris Gendall (Mozart Fellow), val smith (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Barbara Else (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts. 17 July 2016

IPL: Hoka: Motivators of Time (142.47 MB)
Thursday, 14 July 2016
Professor Poia Rewi of Te Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture, "Hoka: Motivators of Time". Professor Rewi (Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Te Arawa) works on a regional and national level in multiple areas of Te Reo promotion, teaching and research. 14 July 2016.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Professor Roger Clark (244.74 MB)
Thursday, 7 July 2016
Professor Roger Clark is a graduate of Victoria University of Wellington and of Columbia Law School in New York. He began his teaching career at Victoria in 1964 and has taught at Rutgers Law School in New Jersey since 1972. He represented Samoa at the International Court of Justice in the Advisory Proceedings on the Legality of the Use or Threat of use of Nuclear Weapons in 1995 and is currently a member of the team representing the Marshall Islands in its ICJ cases on nuclear weapons. The team has been nominated by the International Peace Bureau for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize. In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS), Professor Clark will discuss the influences that have determined the course of his life and career.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Ven. Robina Courtin (166.83 MB)
Friday, 3 June 2016
Venerable Robina Courtin has spent much of her life working for peace in various ways, initially as a left-wing feminist activist, and later as a Buddhist nun. In conversation with Joe Llewelyn she shares some of her wealth of knowledge and experience, including her work with prisoners and teaching around the world.

Faculty of Law: Pike River - How could this happen in this day and age? (107.88 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2016
Colin Smith, Chairman on the Pike River Families Group Committee and the Pike River 29 Legacy Trust, talks about the Pike River disaster and asks how could this happen in this day and age? Find out why the Pike River Families have fought so hard and for so long. Colin Smith is a law graduate from the University of Otago and is a partner with the Greymouth Law Firm Hannan & Seddon.

CTPI: Good Governance - Designing Democratic Institutions for a Sustainable Future (147.65 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Public Lecture with Professor Jonathan Boston from the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. He discusses the role of governance in sustainability and how to move from a short term focus at a governmental level to a longer term focus.

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2016 – Making the penalty fit the crime: the pros and cons of civil pecuniary penalties as a means of enforcing commercial law (97.41 MB)
Wednesday, 4 May 2016
Civil pecuniary penalties are an increasingly common feature of regulatory legislation such as the Commerce Act 1986 and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013. They have been both welcomed as a pragmatic “third way” between purely civil remedies and criminal charges and condemned as incompatible with human rights and the principles which underpin the criminal justice system. This lecture considers both sides of the debate and whether it is possible to reconcile the competing views. Presented by Jenny Cooper, who graduated from Otago in 1995 and now practices in Auckland as a commercial barrister with specialist expertise in company and securities law and fair trading and competition law.

IPL: Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome (130.78 MB)
Tuesday, 3 May 2016
Professor Jon Hall, Head of the Department of Classics, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome”. Jon's research focuses on Cicero – in particular, Cicero's letters and speeches. Recently Jon completed a book on Cicero’s use of showmanship in the Roman law courts. 3 May 2016

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Relational Self (105.61 MB)
Thursday, 21 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Relational Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the fourth of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

Faculty of Law: The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects (155.88 MB)
Tuesday, 19 April 2016
James and Jean Davis Prestige Visiting Fellow, Professor Don McRae C.C delivers a public lecture on 'The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects'. The lecture focuses on the changes that have occurred in the field of international law over the past 50 years, and the challenges that these developments pose for both the theory and practice of international law including its legitimacy.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Abused Self (94.52 MB)
Thursday, 14 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Abused Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the third of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Caring Self (127.32 MB)
Tuesday, 12 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Caring Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the second of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Vulnerable Self (121.92 MB)
Monday, 21 March 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Vulnerable Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the first of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

IPL: "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre (206.11 MB)
Wednesday, 9 March 2016
Professor Stuart Young's Inaugural Professorial Lecture is entitled "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre. Professor Stuart Young is currently Head of the Department of Music (which incorporates the Theatre Studies programme and the Bachelor of Peforming Arts programme). His research interests include Documentary/Verbatim Theatre; Russian drama, in particular Chekhov, and its reception abroad; Translation Studies and translation for the theatre; Modern British drama and theatre; New Zealand drama and theatre; Gay and queer drama. 8 March 2016

Erica Chenoweth - Why civil resistance works (131.58 MB)
Thursday, 11 February 2016
Between 1900 and 2015, campaigns of nonviolent resistance were about twice as effective as violent insurgencies. In this talk, Professor Erica Chenoweth will review the impressive historical record of civil resistance in the 20th century and discuss the promise of unarmed struggle in the 21st century. She will expand upon her book (co-authored with Maria Stephan) 'Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict', which won the 2013 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.

Public Conversation with Professor Erica Chenoweth (171.06 MB)
Thursday, 4 February 2016
Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives, in 2014 she received the 2014 Karl Deutsch Award, given annually to the scholar under the age of 40 who has made the greatest impact on the field of international politics or peace research. In this conversation she discusses her life, influences and research with Dr Charles Butcher from the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Erica Chenoweth - 'Do Violent Flanks Help or Hurt Campaigns of Nonviolent Resistance?' (224.00 MB)
Tuesday, 2 February 2016
An open lecture by Erica Chenoweth, Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives.

NCPACS: Public Conversation - How wars end: Past trends and future prospects (311.29 MB)
Tuesday, 3 November 2015
Dr. Joakim Kreutz, Assistant Professor at the University of Uppsala, is an expert on how wars end, and what causes them to end. His research has focused on trends in war termination over the past 60 years, and more recently has examined the Colombian peace process and EU engagement in humanitarian intervention. This public conversation will explore Dr. Kreutz's pathway into this research area, some of the main findings in recent research on war termination, and how these insights might be applied to contemporary conflicts. 3 November 2015

Michael King Memorial Lecture 2015: Sir Tipene O’Regan - A Wanaka Without Walls: A Kai Tahu Knowledge Base of our own (247.50 MB)
Thursday, 1 October 2015
Sir Tipene O’Regan is best known as a long serving chairman of the Ngai Tahu Maori Trust board and as a key figure in the leadership of the Ngai Tahu claim to the Waitangi tribunal and he has been very influential in many other roles. Here he illuminates very important aspects of our places’ past, present, and its future and reflects on key cultural and historical issues of particular pertinence of all New Zealander’s including history, knowledge and tribal identity. 1 October 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The Peace of Islam (219.84 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
Professor Richard Jackson talks to Dr Najibullah Lafraie, Department of Politics, who discusses a range of issues he is concerned about. Dr Lafraie discusses his family and growing up in Afghanistan, the effect of religion in his life and his early education through his study. After leaving Afghanistan for a short time, he returned to carry out his PhD study and continued on to join the resistance against the Soviet Union and continues with how he stayed in the country, in hiding, when the Taliban were present, to finally coming to live in New Zealand. 28 September 2015

CTPI: Faith and Wisdom in Science (331.35 MB)
Tuesday, 22 September 2015
In this talk Professor Tom McLeish, Professor of Physics at Durham University. Tom discusses themes from his recently published book ‘Faith and Wisdom in Science’ (Oxford University Press, 2014). In this book, Tom takes a scientist’s reading of the Old Testament’s Book of Job and uses this ancient text as a centrepiece to make the case for science as a deeply human and ancient activity, embedded in some of the oldest stories told about the human desire to understand the natural world. Drawing on stories from the modern science of chaos and uncertainty, alongside medieval, patristic, classical and Biblical sources, Faith and Wisdom in Science challenges much of the current “science and religion” debate as operating with the wrong assumptions and in the wrong space. There are immediate consequences for how we treat science in government, the media, in education and in churches. 22 September 2015

2015 Archibald Baxter Memorial Trust Peace Lecture – Professor David Tombs (110.96 MB)
Monday, 21 September 2015
Professor David Tombs, Director, Centre for Theology and Public Issues, University of Otago, speaks about the US Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture (2014), which has strongly criticised the interrogation programme overseen by the CIA in the aftermath of 9/11. He connects this to studies of torture practices under authoritarian regimes in Latin America, and suggests that it is also relevant to the field punishment of Archibald Baxter, and other conscience objectors, in World War I. 21 September 2015

Peace Lecture 2015: Pursuing peace in a time of peace and a time of war (343.46 MB)
Wednesday, 9 September 2015
The twelfth annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group, is given by Rabbi Fred Morgan, Professorial Fellow, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne. In this talk Rabbi Fred Morgan will address a number of questions – Does the notion of pursuing peace have to be modified according to the time in which we find ourselves? How do the dynamics of pursuing peace change from one context to the other? What is the role of religions in times of peace and times of war? And how do the dynamics of pursuing peace under different circumstances impact on interfaith relations? 9 September 2015

IPL: Latin American Liberation Theology and its Ongoing Legacy (180.77 MB)
Tuesday, 8 September 2015
Professor David Tombs holds the Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues and is Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at the University of Otago. His Inaugural Professorial Lecture discusses Latin American liberation theology and its ongoing legacy. 8 September 2015

CTPI: Can there be a unified theory of religious freedom? (242.97 MB)
Wednesday, 19 August 2015
In this talk Professor Peter Danchin, Professor of Law and Director of the International and Comparative Law Program at the University of Maryland School of Law discusses the three key concepts in modern religious freedom discourse – neutrality, universality and legality. What is increasingly recognised, however, is the extent to which these concepts are inextricably entangled, historically and substantively, with theological concepts and categories. In drawing out these connections and assessing their implications for three central questions concerning the subject, object and justification of the right to religious liberty, this talk asks whether there can be a unified theory of religious freedom and in what sense we can say the right is independent of religious traditions and the contested notions of freedom within them. 19 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Katherine Runswick-Cole (35.83 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
Katherine Runswick-Cole, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, discusses her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’ which she completed in collaboration with Dan Goodley of the University of Sheffield, UK. In this paper they seek to develop an understanding of social policy driven by a commitment to the politics of disability, especially the politics of people labeled with learning disabilities. 12 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Paul Gibson (153.36 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
This presentation given by Paul Gibson, Disability Rights Commissioner, follows on from Katherine Runswick-Cole’s talk on her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’. In this talk he focuses on the journey of understanding, and the role of research in making disability rights real. 12 August 2015

2015 Hocken Lecture: 'Archives, Public Memory and the work of history' (292.42 MB)
Thursday, 6 August 2015
Professor Tony Ballantyne, former Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, Chair of the Hocken Collections Committee and Director of the University’s Centre for Research on Colonial Culture has been engaged in a long-running research project on the production of colonial culture. This lecture explores the nature of archives, the possibilities of digitisation, and the role of both archival collections and historical writing in the making and remaking of cultural memory. 6 August 2015

CTPI: Changing our mind on the LGBT issue (146.45 MB)
Thursday, 30 July 2015
Dr. David P. Gushee is a Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. His research interests focus on the ethical teachings of Jesus Christ and the Christian theological-ethical tradition, together with its contemporary implications for Christian discipleship and public witness. In this talk he speaks on his personal journey toward a change of his own heart and mind in becoming an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender inclusion in the Church, and his recent book ‘Changing Our Mind’ and the impact that it is having. 30 July 2015

Philosophy: 2015 Dan & Gwen Taylor Lecture: Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity (196.32 MB)
Tuesday, 28 July 2015
Professor Jeremy Waldron, Professor of Law at New York University speaks on the topic of ‘Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity’. What does it mean to say we are all one another’s equals? Does a sense of equality distinguish humans from other animals? On what is this human equality based? Is it a religious idea? Is it a practical commitment? Is it just a matter of human rights? Is there supposed to be some shared feature that all human beings have in common? And if we take that approach, what are we to say about our brothers and sisters who suffer from profound disability—whose human claims seem to outstrip any particular description that they satisfy or any capacity that they have? 28 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Magna Carta in a Handcart, From 1215 to 2015 and Far Beyond (204.97 MB)
Tuesday, 21 July 2015
What’s Magna Carta — legal icon, myth, or misconception? When was Magna Carta —1215, say the historians, the lawyers (were they to agree) might say 1297. In this talk Dr Nigel Jamieson, Faculty of Law at the University of Otago discusses what Magna Carta might mean for us today — being in Latin most modernists would shrug it off; some cynics say it means nothing much, since it’s only called the Great Charter because in 1215 they couldn’t text it down to twenty words; others say it’s not for us today because we’re far more up with the political play; and then there are those today who extol it to divert our attention away from the fact that they’re fiddling the books behind our backs. 21 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Against Written Constitutionalism (238.81 MB)
Wednesday, 15 July 2015
Professor Jim Allan is the Garrick Professor of Law at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland and previously belonged to the University of Otago Faculty of Law for 11 years. In this talk Professor Allan discusses four key points, what an unwritten constitution amounts to, the point of written constitutionalism and what you are being promised when offered a written constitution. Finally he explains why a written constitution has limited choice and the process of making a decision between a written and unwritten constitution. 15 July 2015

Meet the 2015 Otago Fellows (307.71 MB)
Sunday, 12 July 2015
The 2015 University of Otago Fellows: Louise Wallace (Robert Burns Fellow), John Ward Knox (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Uzoamaka Nwankpa (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Robyn Belton (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. Jennifer Beck who is sharing the University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence, was unable to attend. 12 July 2015

NCPACS & CTPI: Non-Toxic Religion: The Churches in the Peace Movement in 1980’s New Zealand (188.16 MB)
Thursday, 28 May 2015
Reverend Dr Peter Matheson studied in Otago, (History) Edinburgh, and Tübingen (Theology); edited Critic and taught religious history in New College Edinburgh, Otago and Melbourne. He has been active in the peace movement in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Germany and New Zealand and is the author of fifteen books and countless articles on reforming movements, radical and women's history in the Early Modern Period in Germany, and on aspects of New Zealand and Third Reich history. He is a Presbyterian minister and Honorary Fellow of the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Otago. In this talk, he discusses the churches in the peace movement in 1980’s New Zealand. 28 May 2015

NCPACS: Heart and mind in the quest for justice and peace (362.32 MB)
Wednesday, 20 May 2015
Professor Peter Matheson has led a rich life of theological and historical scholarship, reflection, pastoral care and radical activism. He has urged Churches and States in the UK, Germany and New Zealand to confront violence and war and to work for peace, justice and a more compassionate world while also engaging many of the major issues of the 20th century. In this talk with Professor Kevin Clements, he discusses his life growing up, his experiences in peacemaking and the heart and mind in the quest for justice. 20 May 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation with Kennedy Graham, Green Party MP (219.74 MB)
Wednesday, 13 May 2015
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Dr Kennedy Graham discusses the subject of 'Human Security and Global Order: A 21st Century Agenda'. Kennedy Graham served in the New Zealand Foreign Service for 16 years, and has lectured on International Politics and International Law at both the University of Canterbury and Victoria University. He was elected to Parliament for the Greens in 2008 and re-elected in 2011, and holds portfolios of Global Affairs, Defence and Disarmament, and Constitutional Affairs. 13 May 2015

IPL: Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history (217.52 MB)
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
Professor Takashi Shogimen of the Department of History & Art History delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history”. 21 April 2015

CTPI: Faith and Reconciliation: Insights from the South African Experience (140.82 MB)
Thursday, 16 April 2015
Piet Meiring, Emeritus Professor of Theology and Missiology at the University of Pretoria, and a former member of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission chaired by Desmond Tutu, speaks about the role of faith and theology in the post-apartheid reconciliation process, and offers insights from the South African experience. 16 April 2015

Faculty of Law: Advocacy to Expand Autonomy at the End of Life in the US: Evolving Law, Medicine and Policy (96.56 MB)
Tuesday, 17 March 2015
Professor Kathryn Tucker, Executive Director of The Disability Rights Legal Center, Los Angeles, discusses the rights of terminally ill patients to make choices to ensure a dying process that is consistent with their values and beliefs; these rights have been rapidly evolving in the US. Professor Tucker, a veteran of nearly every effort to protect and expand end of life choice in the US for more that two decades, will share insight on advocacy strategies, progress, challenges and predictions. She also discusses advocacy in the courthouse, the statehouse and in various policy forums. 17 March 2015

Faculty of Law: Global Animal Law and New Project (113.27 MB)
Monday, 16 March 2015
In this talk, Sabine Brels explores these questions in providing a global overview of animal law at three levels: National, European and International. What is animal law, where does it come from, and how is it evolving? Why can we say that it is progressing worldwide? What are its main strengths and weaknesses in order to protect the welfare of animals against cruelty and suffering, either legally or illegally perpetrated? She also looks at current efforts to set up a universal protection of animal welfare. Lastly, she presents the new Global Animal Law (GAL) Project, aiming to improve the law for animals all around the world. 16 March 2015

Matariki Humanities Colloquium 2014: Communicating the Humanities: a perspective from the University of Otago (204.27 MB)
Monday, 8 December 2014
This lecture, given by Professor Tony Ballantyne, Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, explores some of the challenges and opportunities that are facing scholars in the Humanities in New Zealand. It is particularly concerned with questions of communication, from the classroom to policy debates, from the changing infrastructure for publication and review to questions of language itself. In exploring these issues, it argues for the continued importance of some key aspects of the traditional idea of the University (especially 'the lecture'), makes the case for a much more co-ordinated drive to make Humanities research accessible and also identifies some significant ways forward for the Humanities in New Zealand in a 'digital age'. 8 December 2014

NCPACS: A Rights Based Approach to Food Security: An Urgent Challenge (146.62 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
Professor Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on Right to Food, evaluates the human rights based approach in relation to the right to adequate and healthy food given the reality and impact of the political, environmental and economic challenges of the 21st century. Professor Elver discusses the strong resistance by global market forces to rights based approach to food security as it supposedly interferes with free market principles; and moreover, the right to food as embedded in the Covenant of the Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights is not taken nearly as seriously by many developed countries as is the companion treaty, Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. 10 November 2014

NCPACS: Prospects for Peace in the Middle East (175.23 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
In 2008, despite active opposition from Jewish groups, the United Nations Human Rights Council appointed Professor Richard Falk to a six-year term as a United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. Professor Falk, Emeritus Professor of International Law at Princeton University, is described as ‘a critical analyst of the role of international law in global politics’. In this talk he discusses prospects for peace in the Middle East. 10 November 2014

Faculty of Law: From Hypatia to Victor Hugo to Larry and Sergey: “All the world’s knowledge” and Universal Authors’ Rights (118.32 MB)
Thursday, 23 October 2014
Professor Jane C. Ginsburg of the Columbia University School of Law discusses two utopian goals: universal access to knowledge, and universal authors’ rights. She also addresses the clash of utopias epitomised by the Google book-scanning programme and the legal responses it has inspired, including the recent decision by the SDNY upholding Google’s fair use defence. 23 October 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana campaign (438.04 MB)
Monday, 20 October 2014
In this conversation, panellists Claire Carey, Gregor Morgan and Allan Cumming join Professor Kevin Clements to discuss the role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana Campaign and the lessons for other communities around the world. 20 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Compared to What? (196.39 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the fourth and final lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Compared to What? The basic argument is that comparative literature grew from interdisciplinarity in the late eighteenth/early nineteenth centuries, struggled to become an autonomous field and in the process lost its interdisciplinary dimensions, then has been recovering them on new bases, but in an academic environment that is slow to reward risk-taking, unlike the moment immediately after the French Revolution when the gesture of sweeping the slate clean and inventing new sciences came naturally to so many of our predecessors. 10 October 2014

CCCS: Comparison and Ethics (155.26 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Through discussion of the conceptual metaphor of facing a crossroads, Professor Zhang Longxi of City University of Hong Kong will first establish the necessity of comparison in a general sense, and then will use another conceptual metaphor of killing a Chinese mandarin to explore the ethics of comparison, the issue of the relationship with one’s own group versus relationship, or the lack of it, with outsiders and strangers. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the physical and psychological distance of human beings from one another is shrinking, and so is the possibility of moral indifference toward others outside one’s own group. This talk is sponsored by the University of Otago Research Theme for Cross-Cultural and Comparative Studies. 10 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: History-Writing and Moral Community in China (237.14 MB)
Thursday, 2 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the third lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, History-Writing and Moral Community in China. The Chinese claim, seen with increasing frequency in current soft-power propaganda campaigns, of "5000 years of history" needs to be read in light of a process, over 2000 years long itself, of consensus-building by, of and for historians. How does such a thing as the Chinese Empire become, first an imaginary solution, then an inescapable reality, for a large part of humanity? The arts of rhetorical reading help us to see the successive articulations of what we now know as "China" or "Zhongguo." 2 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Doctoring the State: Plato, Hobbes, Humboldt, Hegel, Virchow (143.44 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the second lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series. Western political philosophy, at its beginning (Plato's Republic), introduces an analogy between medical treatment and political reform that, like all metaphors, has consequences on both the supposedly different domains that it incorporates. As long as the metaphor is viewed as a mere analogy, however, the practical relation of medicine to state survival is obscured. The historical development, through a series of political theorists, some of them physicians, explains the in-between status of the field of public health. 22 September 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction (242.01 MB)
Thursday, 18 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the first lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction. Though it has become part of our common-sense understanding, the idea of a deep and comprehensive difference between the ways of thinking in predominantly oral and predominantly written cultures dates to the early twentieth century, at the most, and received its impetus from polemics now largely forgotten. By retracing this history, we can work out a genealogy for media studies that will accommodate a larger definition of the human. 18 September 2014

NCPACS: Guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand (140.41 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
In this conversation Tim Ashton, a former member of the Armed Offenders and Special Tactics group in the New Zealand Police force, talks with Professor Kevin Clements about guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand. In 1990 Tim was one of the Special Tactics team that shot David Gray in Aramoana. Over the course of his career he has been involved in many incidents where offenders have taken their own lives after killing others, including partners and children. Tim has been shot in the course of his duty and has received two medals for bravery. 15 September 2014

Dr Robin Jackson: “Messy, debatable and unquantifiable”: Championing the Humanities (227.41 MB)
Monday, 8 September 2014
Dr Robin Jackson, Chief Executive and Secretary, British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences, gives a review of some of the challenges and issues that face Humanities in the USA and UK and possibly Australia/New Zealand too. He provides some reflections on the nature of the study of the Humanities which might explain why those challenges arise; and an illustration of various ways in which they can be addressed. 8 September 2014

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2014 – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court (98.63 MB)
Thursday, 4 September 2014
Trevor Shiels QC, delivers the 2014 F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court. 4 September 2014

IPL: Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning (180.76 MB)
Tuesday, 2 September 2014
Professor Tony Harland, Head of the Higher Education Development Centre, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning”. 2 September 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Relationality, Simultaneity, Multiplicity: Theorizing Structures and Flows in Asia (71.20 MB)
Tuesday, 26 August 2014
Devanathan Parthasarathy, Professor of Sociology at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India, presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. Inspired by Doreen Massey’s critique of multiplicity and power-geometry, and Indian anthropological critiques of village studies and urban studies, this talk uses a series of ethnographic illustrations to innovate our ways of comprehending relationality, connectedness, simultaneity, and multiplicity in empirical analysis and theorization of migration, mobility and flows across temporal and spatial units and scales. 26 August 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Circular Migration and Theatres of Accumulation (115.05 MB)
Monday, 25 August 2014
Eric C. Thompson, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Singapore presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. The presentation examines the city as a theatre of accumulation not from the top-down but rather from the bottom-up, that is from the point-of-view of rural-to-urban and transnational migrants for whom cities are sites to accumulate financial as well as social and cultural capital in order to fulfil their own aspirations. Importantly, drawing on examples from Bangkok and Singapore, the site of those aspirations is often elsewhere – not in the city but “back home” in rural areas or other countries. 25 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (124.15 MB)
Thursday, 21 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture six, and the final of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Jerusalem”. 21 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (153.63 MB)
Wednesday, 20 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture five of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Sons of Thunder”. 20 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (123.87 MB)
Tuesday, 19 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture four of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Called to Fish for People”. 19 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (102.66 MB)
Thursday, 14 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Zebedee and Sons”. 14 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (125.09 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The Fishing Industry”. 13 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Do they say what they mean and mean what they say? Some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century (88.37 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Honorable Justice Susan Glazebrook, Supreme Court of New Zealand, delivers this talk on some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century. Justice Glazebrook discusses a number of topics including legislation, modern statutes, the purpose of text in legislation, and interpretation. 13 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (94.05 MB)
Tuesday, 12 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The World of the Lake of Galilee”. 12 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Human Rights in North Korea. Can things change? (128.46 MB)
Tuesday, 5 August 2014
The Honorable Michael Kirby, AC CMG Australia, presents this talk on Human Rights in North Korea. He discusses a number of issues including the torture of prisoners and other violations of human rights. He also discusses the establishment of the Commission of Enquiry in May 2013 to investigate these issues. 5 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Litigating Climate Change (179.97 MB)
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Professor Gerald Torres, Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law at Cornell Law School delivers this talk on 'Litigating Climate Change'. Climate change cases are already being handled by the USA courts. The most prominent are the atmospheric trust cases currently being brought by youth and supported by James Hansen and other scientists. These cases are asking the courts to compel Government to take meaningful action to protect the atmosphere for current and future generations. There have also been liability suits suggested – and at least one filed – over the effects of climate change. Professor Torres discusses the range of cases being brought and suggested in the USA, focusing on the atmospheric trust litigation, and the public trust doctrine which underlies it. 30 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Legal Transplant: Lost in Translation or a Working Misunderstanding (130.64 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Guest Lecturer Mindy Chen-Wishart, a Reader in Contract Law, presents a case study of the transplant of an English doctrine into Singaporean law and explores why the Singaporean courts, while professing to follow it, have applied it to very divergent effect. She compares Western and Confucian value systems—hierarchy versus equality, the positional versus the personal, and collectivism versus individualism—and emphasises the importance of being more aware of the deeply entrenched assumptions of one's own legal system, and of those of other cultures. With the 'changing of the guard' on the world stage, from the West to the East, this is a particularly important time to engage with the Eastern perspective. 24 July 2014

NCPACS and Politics: 2014 Voting Debate: Is it worth voting? (392.59 MB)
Wednesday, 23 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements chairs this debate on the subject ‘Is it worth voting?’ in light of the upcoming election in September. Dr David Clark, MP Dunedin North and Marian Hobbs, former Labour MP, debate the positive argument. Professor Richard Jackson and Dr Bryce Edwards, debate the negative argument. 23 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Marilyn Waring (342.94 MB)
Monday, 21 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements talks to Marilyn Waring, development consultant, academic, writer and former National Party MP who triggered the 1984 snap election when she refused to support her own government in the vote against an opposition-sponsored anti-nuclear bill. Her best known work, "If Women Counted", also published under the title "Counting for Nothing", describes how economic orthodoxies exclude most of women's productive and reproductive work. In this conversation, Professor Clements seeks to explore what triggered Marilyn's interest in peace, justice and human rights. 21 July 2014

Meet the 2014 Otago Fellows (198.97 MB)
Sunday, 13 July 2014
The 2014 University of Otago Arts Fellows: Majella Cullinane (Robert Burns Fellow), Patrick Lundberg (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Louise Potiki Bryant (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Melinda Szymanik (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children's Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. 13 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Religious Freedom: managing the tension between faith and equality in a multicultural society (172.53 MB)
Thursday, 10 July 2014
Professor Patrick Parkinson is a professor of law at the University of Sydney and a specialist in family law, child protection and the law of equity and trusts. He is President of the International Society of Family Law and has written many books. In this talk he discusses the conflict between faith organisations and human rights centre advocates after so many years of coexistence and collaboration. He also goes on to discuss his examinations into finding the balance between equality norms and religious freedom in a multicultural society, and the issue of public funding for religious organisations. 10 July 2014

English & Linguistics: Poetry Reading with Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten at Circadian Rhythm Café (211.45 MB)
Wednesday, 9 July 2014
Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten give poetry readings at the Circadian Rhythm Café. Carla Harryman is a poet, essayist, novelist, and playwright. She has published thirteen single-authored works, including 'Adorno's Noise' (Essay Press, 2008) and 'Open Box' (Belladonna, 2007), and has received numerous grants and awards including from the Foundation for Contemporary Art, Opera America, the American Embassy in Romania, and the Fund for Poetry. Barrett Watten is a language-centered poet, critic, editor, and publisher. Some of his publications include 'Bad History', a nonnarrative prose poem “including history,” (Atelos, 1998) and ''Progress/Under Erasure, in a combined edition, (Green Integer,2004). He edited 'This', one of the central publications of the Language school of poetry (1971-82), and co-edited 'Poetics Journal' with Lyn Hejinian, featuring writing on poetics by poets and academics. 9 July 2014

IPL: Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps (127.33 MB)
Tuesday, 8 July 2014
Professor Sean Fitzsimons of the Department of Geography delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps”. 8 July 2014

Peace Lecture 2014: Believers of the world - unite (142.39 MB)
Monday, 7 July 2014
Rev Dr Lord Leslie Griffiths presents this year's Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group Peace lecture “Believers of the world – unite”. Dr Griffiths, the Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, is a Methodist Minister and Superintendent of Wesley’s Chapel, London, and has been a member of the British House of Lords since 2004. His story begins in real poverty in South Wales. He became the youngest ever staff member at the University of Wales, before the call to ordained ministry led him, via Cambridge, to Haiti to work with some of the poorest people on earth. 7 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Ed Garcia with Professor Kevin Clements (218.76 MB)
Thursday, 26 June 2014
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Professor Ed Garcia will reflect on his life's work, on the central dilemmas confronting human rights and peace practitioners and the ethics of peacebuilding. Professor Ed Garcia is a Peace Process Practitioner. He has worked as a peaceworker, specifically as special peace envoy and senior policy advisor at International Alert, a peace-building organisation working in diverse regions of violent conflict. Ed's work has taken him all over Asia, including the Philippines, Indonesia, East Timor, Fiji, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Kashmir. He has worked in conflict zones on the African continent, in Latin America and the Middle East. 14 April 2014

NCPACS: Maata Wharehoka in conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (633.20 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Maata Wharehoka, a tikanga Maori advocate, discusses with Professor Kevin Clements about being born in the 1950’s into a large unwealthy family and her work as an activist and advocate. She talks about living a pakeha life with her aunty from the age of 11, her experiences through nursing school and studying, and raising her own family of five children, and the fostering of 45 children. 12 May 2014

Geography: Becoming an African Chief: 40 years of research and community involvement in Sierra Leone (208.45 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Professor Tony Binns, University of Otago Ron Lister Chair of Geography, has been bestowed with the most remarkable of honours – being named an African Chief. The Paramount Chief and Section Chiefs of Sandor Chiefdom in Kono District, Eastern Province, Sierra Leone, awarded Professor Binns the titles of ‘Sahr Kayima’ and ‘Chief Manjawah of Sandor’ earlier this year. The honour recognises his work and community involvement over a period of 40 years since he first visited as a PhD student in 1974. He explains his personal journey and how he became interested in Africa and specifically Sierra Leone. He discusses his ongoing research and links with the communities and the significance of the honorary chieftaincy. 11 June 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Professor Ed Garcia (216.89 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Before Professor Ed Garcia departed after an extended visit to the Centre, he interviewed Professor Kevin Clements about his life and times. Kevin has had an illustrious career both in academia and as a consultant to a variety of non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations on disarmament, arms control, conflict resolution, development and regional security issues. He has written widely on conflict transformation, peacebuilding, preventive diplomacy and development with a specific focus on the Asia Pacific region. 24 April 2014

CTPI: Child Poverty: Myths, Misconceptions and Misunderstandings (137.67 MB)
Thursday, 12 June 2014
Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy at VUW, Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Co-chair, Expert Advisory Group (2012) on Solutions to Child Poverty discusses the issue of child poverty: myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings. In discussions about child poverty in New Zealand, one often hears the following claims: ‘There is little or no real child poverty in this country’; ‘The fundamental problem is that some people have too many children’; ‘Many parents are lazy or irresponsible and thus deserve to be poor’; ‘The real problem is not poverty but poor parenting’; ‘We can’t afford to reduce child poverty’; and ‘If we give the poor more money, they will simply waste it’. How valid are such claims? What does the available empirical evidence tell us? What can we learn from the experience of other developed countries? And what ethical principles should guide our policy responses to the challenge of child poverty? 12 June 2014

Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies: An Evening with Adrian McKinty (102.27 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
In this address, we hear the prize-winning author of Fifty Grand and The Cold Cold Ground, Adrian McKinty, read from his new Sean Duffy novel, In the Morning I’ll Be Gone. Adrian is an Irish novelist born in Belfast, Northern Ireland who is primarily known as a writer of crime and mystery novels, and young adult fiction. He is the author of 15 novels and has won a number of awards for his writing since he began in 2001 and has been shortlisted for the Crimewriter’s Association silver dagger award, the Theakston Best British Crime Novel award and the Barry award. 30 April 2014

Faculty of Law: Democracy in Decline (206.85 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professor Jim Allan, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, argues that in five of the world’s oldest democracies, the long-established Anglosphere countries of Canada, New Zealand, the UK, the US and Australia, the past few decades have seen a decline in the extent to which democratic decision-making prevails. He outlines the causes of that decline in democracy and then notes the ways that decline is masked and obfuscated. 16 May 2014

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CTPI: Why Theology Matters to Tree Frogs (90.01 MB)
Sunday, 20 November 2016
A Public Lecture with Rev. Peter Harris, Anglican Minister, Conservationist, and Co-Founder of Christian Conservation Organisation A Rocha. 24 November 2016

CTPI & NCPACS: World Council of Churches' Response to Religious Violence (102.44 MB)
Friday, 7 October 2016
Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit addresses the World Council of Churches Central Committee’s recent ‘Statement on Religion and Violence’ (28 June 2016), which addresses the persistence and spread of extremist violence in the world, and its ambiguous connections with religion. 7 October 2016.

Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture: The politics of compassion in a world of ruthless power (87.81 MB)
Wednesday, 28 September 2016
Professor Kevin Clements delivers the 2016 Archibald Baxter Memorial Lecture. 28 September 2016

IPL: Planning biodiverse cities for all ages (75.54 MB)
Tuesday, 20 September 2016
As an environmental planner, Claire Freeman’s research focuses on the intersection of the natural and built environment. She examines how environmental relationships can be enhanced through more effective planning policy, design and practice. In particular, she looks at how planning can help create urban environments that work better for children and young people, and for nature. It links across three major disciplinary fields; the social sciences, biological science and planning. Some current and recent projects she is involved with are: “Natural neighbourhoods for city children”, a Marsden-funded study exploring how children in Dunedin, Auckland and Wellington connect with nature in their daily lives; “the Dunedin Garden Study,” which investigates householders’ relationships with native biodiversity in their gardens; “Children and young people’s experiences following the Christchurch earthquake”; and a study of “Children’s experiences of neighbourhood” in New Zealand, Fiji and Kiribati. 20 September 2016

IPL: Toitū te Whenua, Toitū te Mana (61.57 MB)
Monday, 12 September 2016
In this Inaugural Professorial Lecture, Professor Jacinta Ruru anchors her research journey within this Māori proverb to help bring alive the endurance and 'foreverness' of the Māori world in Aotearoa. Professor Ruru shares the ways in which she has sought to contribute towards challenging the law to more respectfully recognise and embrace Indigenous peoples’ authority, laws, values, rights and responsibilities to own, govern and manage land and water. 12 September 2016

Theology and Religion: Towards an Ecumenical Political Theology: Charisms Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist (44.85 MB)
Tuesday, 6 September 2016
Rev Dr Doug Gay is the Stuart Residence Halls Council Distinguished Visitor for 2016. In this public lecture, he traces the outline of an ecumenical political theology incorporating the Catholic, Reformed and Anabaptist traditions of narrative, discipline and witness, with particular reference to the political and economic environment and events leading to the post 2008 economic crisis. 6 September 2016.

National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies: Adam Curle Radical Peacemaker (12.84 MB)
Wednesday, 31 August 2016
Professor Kevin Clements gives a recorded presentation to the Adam Curle Symposium held at the University of Bradford

Peace Lecture 2016: Between Law and Spirituality – Islam’s legal basis for its spirit of peaceful coexistence (101.35 MB)
Wednesday, 24 August 2016
Imam Afroz Ali is the founder and president of Al-Ghazzali Centre for Islamic Sciences & Human Development in Sydney, Australia, and an Australian Ambassador for the Charter of Compassion. He is also a founding member of the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change and served as managing director for SeekersHub Global. This is the 13th annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group. 24 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 6 (83.99 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in Modern Literature'. 4 August 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Graham Virgo - Conscience in Equity: a new Utopia (59.09 MB)
Thursday, 4 August 2016
The Faculty of Law presents this public lecture by Professor Graham Virgo, 2016 NZ Law Foundation Distinguished Visiting Fellow, 2016 FW Guest Memorial Lecturer. In 1516 Sir Thomas More published Utopia, which identifies an attractive vision of law and society. As Lord Chancellor, More helped to develop Equity as a mechanism to secure justice which was not provided through the rigid interpretation of the Common Law. From the start, the equitable jurisdiction was founded on conscience. By tracing the historical development of conscience it is possible to identify the theoretical structure which justifies and explains the equitable jurisdiction and shows how it should develop in the future.

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 5 (85.92 MB)
Wednesday, 3 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job Through the Eyes of Artists'. 3 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 4 (97.48 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job as a Contested Classic'. 2 August 2016

IPL: Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development (67.12 MB)
Tuesday, 2 August 2016
Professor Etienne Nel of the Department of Geography, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Dealing with Difference: Responses to uneven geographical development”. Etienne has authored, co-authored or edited 10 books, and has written nearly 30 book chapters and more than 100 articles, primarily on economic development in Africa. 2 August 2016

NCPACS: After Chilcot: The consequences of the Chilcot Report for armed intervention and war (61.83 MB)
Monday, 1 August 2016
This forum reflects on some of the global lessons to be learned from the Chilcot report. The report systematically and comprehensively demolishes Tony Blair and George Bush’s justifications for embroiling the UK in the most disastrous war of the modern era. It also raises some fundamental questions about international criminal accountability for acts of aggression and wider questions about where the responsibility for war should lie in Westminster-style democracies. The panel includes Professor Robert Patman (Politics), Associate Professor Lisa Ellis (Philosophy) and Mr Stephen Smith (Law), chaired by Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS). 1 August 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 3 (87.72 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Theological Conversations in Job'. 28 July 2016

Faculty of Law: Professor Jeremy Waldron - Death lists and death squads: Targeted killing and the character of the State (56.54 MB)
Thursday, 28 July 2016
'My intention in this lecture is to urge critical reflection upon current US practices of targeted killing by considering, not just whether acts of targeted killing can be legally justified, but also what sort of state we are turning into when we organize the use of lethal force in this way -maintaining a list of named enemies of the state who are to be eliminated in this way.' A prolific scholar, Jeremy Waldron teaches legal and political philosophy at NYU School of Law. Until recently, he was also Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory at Oxford University (All Souls College).

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 2 (83.58 MB)
Wednesday, 27 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'The Artistry of the (Hebrew) Book of Job'. 27 July 2016

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2016: Professor Choon-Leong Seow - The Story of Job: A contested classic 1 (81.12 MB)
Tuesday, 26 July 2016
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2016 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Choon-Leong Seow, Vanderbilt Divinity School, this presentation covers the topic 'Job in the Cradle of World Literature'. 26 July 2016

Meet the 2016 Otago Fellows (94.58 MB)
Sunday, 17 July 2016
The 2016 University of Otago Fellows: Victor Rodger (Robert Burns Fellow), Miranda Parkes (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Chris Gendall (Mozart Fellow), val smith (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Barbara Else (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts. 17 July 2016

IPL: Hoka: Motivators of Time (74.80 MB)
Thursday, 14 July 2016
Professor Poia Rewi of Te Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture, "Hoka: Motivators of Time". Professor Rewi (Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Te Arawa) works on a regional and national level in multiple areas of Te Reo promotion, teaching and research. 14 July 2016.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Professor Roger Clark (66.51 MB)
Thursday, 7 July 2016
Professor Roger Clark is a graduate of Victoria University of Wellington and of Columbia Law School in New York. He began his teaching career at Victoria in 1964 and has taught at Rutgers Law School in New Jersey since 1972. He represented Samoa at the International Court of Justice in the Advisory Proceedings on the Legality of the Use or Threat of use of Nuclear Weapons in 1995 and is currently a member of the team representing the Marshall Islands in its ICJ cases on nuclear weapons. The team has been nominated by the International Peace Bureau for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize. In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (NCPACS), Professor Clark will discuss the influences that have determined the course of his life and career.

NCPACS: Public conversation with Ven. Robina Courtin (45.35 MB)
Friday, 3 June 2016
Venerable Robina Courtin has spent much of her life working for peace in various ways, initially as a left-wing feminist activist, and later as a Buddhist nun. In conversation with Joe Llewelyn she shares some of her wealth of knowledge and experience, including her work with prisoners and teaching around the world.

Faculty of Law: Pike River - How could this happen in this day and age? (59.86 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2016
Colin Smith, Chairman on the Pike River Families Group Committee and the Pike River 29 Legacy Trust, talks about the Pike River disaster and asks how could this happen in this day and age? Find out why the Pike River Families have fought so hard and for so long. Colin Smith is a law graduate from the University of Otago and is a partner with the Greymouth Law Firm Hannan & Seddon.

CTPI: Good Governance - Designing Democratic Institutions for a Sustainable Future (67.76 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Public Lecture with Professor Jonathan Boston from the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. He discusses the role of governance in sustainability and how to move from a short term focus at a governmental level to a longer term focus.

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2016 – Making the penalty fit the crime: the pros and cons of civil pecuniary penalties as a means of enforcing commercial law (49.89 MB)
Wednesday, 4 May 2016
Civil pecuniary penalties are an increasingly common feature of regulatory legislation such as the Commerce Act 1986 and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013. They have been both welcomed as a pragmatic “third way” between purely civil remedies and criminal charges and condemned as incompatible with human rights and the principles which underpin the criminal justice system. This lecture considers both sides of the debate and whether it is possible to reconcile the competing views. Presented by Jenny Cooper, who graduated from Otago in 1995 and now practices in Auckland as a commercial barrister with specialist expertise in company and securities law and fair trading and competition law.

IPL: Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome (58.65 MB)
Tuesday, 3 May 2016
Professor Jon Hall, Head of the Department of Classics, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Murderous Politeness in Ancient Rome”. Jon's research focuses on Cicero – in particular, Cicero's letters and speeches. Recently Jon completed a book on Cicero’s use of showmanship in the Roman law courts. 3 May 2016

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Relational Self (48.50 MB)
Thursday, 21 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Relational Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the fourth of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

Faculty of Law: The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects (67.14 MB)
Tuesday, 19 April 2016
James and Jean Davis Prestige Visiting Fellow, Professor Don McRae C.C delivers a public lecture on 'The Evolution of International Law: Challenges and Prospects'. The lecture focuses on the changes that have occurred in the field of international law over the past 50 years, and the challenges that these developments pose for both the theory and practice of international law including its legitimacy.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Abused Self (56.54 MB)
Thursday, 14 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Abused Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the third of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Caring Self (69.16 MB)
Tuesday, 12 April 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Caring Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the second of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

De Carle Lecture Series 2016: The Law and the Vulnerable Self (63.16 MB)
Monday, 21 March 2016
De Carle Lecture series The Law and the Vulnerable Self Professor Jonathan Herring, DM Wolfe-Clarendon Fellow in Law, University of Oxford and 2016 De Carle Distinguished Lecturer presents the first of four public lectures in the Relational Law series.

IPL: "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre (69.02 MB)
Wednesday, 9 March 2016
Professor Stuart Young's Inaugural Professorial Lecture is entitled "We need new forms": Playful Adventures from Chekhov to Verbatim Theatre. Professor Stuart Young is currently Head of the Department of Music (which incorporates the Theatre Studies programme and the Bachelor of Peforming Arts programme). His research interests include Documentary/Verbatim Theatre; Russian drama, in particular Chekhov, and its reception abroad; Translation Studies and translation for the theatre; Modern British drama and theatre; New Zealand drama and theatre; Gay and queer drama. 8 March 2016

Erica Chenoweth - Why civil resistance works (46.21 MB)
Thursday, 11 February 2016
Between 1900 and 2015, campaigns of nonviolent resistance were about twice as effective as violent insurgencies. In this talk, Professor Erica Chenoweth will review the impressive historical record of civil resistance in the 20th century and discuss the promise of unarmed struggle in the 21st century. She will expand upon her book (co-authored with Maria Stephan) 'Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict', which won the 2013 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.

Public Conversation with Professor Erica Chenoweth (70.32 MB)
Thursday, 4 February 2016
Erica Chenoweth is Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives, in 2014 she received the 2014 Karl Deutsch Award, given annually to the scholar under the age of 40 who has made the greatest impact on the field of international politics or peace research. In this conversation she discusses her life, influences and research with Dr Charles Butcher from the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Erica Chenoweth - 'Do Violent Flanks Help or Hurt Campaigns of Nonviolent Resistance?' (98.35 MB)
Tuesday, 2 February 2016
An open lecture by Erica Chenoweth, Professor & Associate Dean for Research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Professor Chenoweth is an internationally recognised authority on political violence and its alternatives.

NCPACS: Public Conversation - How wars end: Past trends and future prospects (72.49 MB)
Tuesday, 3 November 2015
Dr. Joakim Kreutz, Assistant Professor at the University of Uppsala, is an expert on how wars end, and what causes them to end. His research has focused on trends in war termination over the past 60 years, and more recently has examined the Colombian peace process and EU engagement in humanitarian intervention. This public conversation will explore Dr. Kreutz's pathway into this research area, some of the main findings in recent research on war termination, and how these insights might be applied to contemporary conflicts. 3 November 2015

Michael King Memorial Lecture 2015: Sir Tipene O’Regan - A Wanaka Without Walls: A Kai Tahu Knowledge Base of our own (79.95 MB)
Thursday, 1 October 2015
Sir Tipene O’Regan is best known as a long serving chairman of the Ngai Tahu Maori Trust board and as a key figure in the leadership of the Ngai Tahu claim to the Waitangi tribunal and he has been very influential in many other roles. Here he illuminates very important aspects of our places’ past, present, and its future and reflects on key cultural and historical issues of particular pertinence of all New Zealander’s including history, knowledge and tribal identity. 1 October 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The Peace of Islam (67.96 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
Professor Richard Jackson talks to Dr Najibullah Lafraie, Department of Politics, who discusses a range of issues he is concerned about. Dr Lafraie discusses his family and growing up in Afghanistan, the effect of religion in his life and his early education through his study. After leaving Afghanistan for a short time, he returned to carry out his PhD study and continued on to join the resistance against the Soviet Union and continues with how he stayed in the country, in hiding, when the Taliban were present, to finally coming to live in New Zealand. 28 September 2015

CTPI: Faith and Wisdom in Science (89.39 MB)
Tuesday, 22 September 2015
In this talk Professor Tom McLeish, Professor of Physics at Durham University. Tom discusses themes from his recently published book ‘Faith and Wisdom in Science’ (Oxford University Press, 2014). In this book, Tom takes a scientist’s reading of the Old Testament’s Book of Job and uses this ancient text as a centrepiece to make the case for science as a deeply human and ancient activity, embedded in some of the oldest stories told about the human desire to understand the natural world. Drawing on stories from the modern science of chaos and uncertainty, alongside medieval, patristic, classical and Biblical sources, Faith and Wisdom in Science challenges much of the current “science and religion” debate as operating with the wrong assumptions and in the wrong space. There are immediate consequences for how we treat science in government, the media, in education and in churches. 22 September 2015

2015 Archibald Baxter Memorial Trust Peace Lecture – Professor David Tombs (73.66 MB)
Monday, 21 September 2015
Professor David Tombs, Director, Centre for Theology and Public Issues, University of Otago, speaks about the US Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture (2014), which has strongly criticised the interrogation programme overseen by the CIA in the aftermath of 9/11. He connects this to studies of torture practices under authoritarian regimes in Latin America, and suggests that it is also relevant to the field punishment of Archibald Baxter, and other conscience objectors, in World War I. 21 September 2015

Peace Lecture 2015: Pursuing peace in a time of peace and a time of war (92.41 MB)
Wednesday, 9 September 2015
The twelfth annual peace lecture, organised by the Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and the Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group, is given by Rabbi Fred Morgan, Professorial Fellow, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne. In this talk Rabbi Fred Morgan will address a number of questions – Does the notion of pursuing peace have to be modified according to the time in which we find ourselves? How do the dynamics of pursuing peace change from one context to the other? What is the role of religions in times of peace and times of war? And how do the dynamics of pursuing peace under different circumstances impact on interfaith relations? 9 September 2015

IPL: Latin American Liberation Theology and its Ongoing Legacy (64.90 MB)
Tuesday, 8 September 2015
Professor David Tombs holds the Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues and is Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues at the University of Otago. His Inaugural Professorial Lecture discusses Latin American liberation theology and its ongoing legacy. 8 September 2015

CTPI: Can there be a unified theory of religious freedom? (69.96 MB)
Wednesday, 19 August 2015
In this talk Professor Peter Danchin, Professor of Law and Director of the International and Comparative Law Program at the University of Maryland School of Law discusses the three key concepts in modern religious freedom discourse – neutrality, universality and legality. What is increasingly recognised, however, is the extent to which these concepts are inextricably entangled, historically and substantively, with theological concepts and categories. In drawing out these connections and assessing their implications for three central questions concerning the subject, object and justification of the right to religious liberty, this talk asks whether there can be a unified theory of religious freedom and in what sense we can say the right is independent of religious traditions and the contested notions of freedom within them. 19 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Katherine Runswick-Cole (26.88 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
Katherine Runswick-Cole, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, discusses her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’ which she completed in collaboration with Dan Goodley of the University of Sheffield, UK. In this paper they seek to develop an understanding of social policy driven by a commitment to the politics of disability, especially the politics of people labeled with learning disabilities. 12 August 2015

College of Education: Becoming Dishuman: Re-thinking social policy through disability, Paul Gibson (49.50 MB)
Wednesday, 12 August 2015
This presentation given by Paul Gibson, Disability Rights Commissioner, follows on from Katherine Runswick-Cole’s talk on her research project ‘Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society’. In this talk he focuses on the journey of understanding, and the role of research in making disability rights real. 12 August 2015

2015 Hocken Lecture: 'Archives, Public Memory and the work of history' (94.89 MB)
Thursday, 6 August 2015
Professor Tony Ballantyne, former Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, Chair of the Hocken Collections Committee and Director of the University’s Centre for Research on Colonial Culture has been engaged in a long-running research project on the production of colonial culture. This lecture explores the nature of archives, the possibilities of digitisation, and the role of both archival collections and historical writing in the making and remaking of cultural memory. 6 August 2015

CTPI: Changing our mind on the LGBT issue (54.94 MB)
Thursday, 30 July 2015
Dr. David P. Gushee is a Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University. His research interests focus on the ethical teachings of Jesus Christ and the Christian theological-ethical tradition, together with its contemporary implications for Christian discipleship and public witness. In this talk he speaks on his personal journey toward a change of his own heart and mind in becoming an advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender inclusion in the Church, and his recent book ‘Changing Our Mind’ and the impact that it is having. 30 July 2015

Philosophy: 2015 Dan & Gwen Taylor Lecture: Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity (55.66 MB)
Tuesday, 28 July 2015
Professor Jeremy Waldron, Professor of Law at New York University speaks on the topic of ‘Profound Disability and Distinctive Human Dignity’. What does it mean to say we are all one another’s equals? Does a sense of equality distinguish humans from other animals? On what is this human equality based? Is it a religious idea? Is it a practical commitment? Is it just a matter of human rights? Is there supposed to be some shared feature that all human beings have in common? And if we take that approach, what are we to say about our brothers and sisters who suffer from profound disability—whose human claims seem to outstrip any particular description that they satisfy or any capacity that they have? 28 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Magna Carta in a Handcart, From 1215 to 2015 and Far Beyond (90.51 MB)
Tuesday, 21 July 2015
What’s Magna Carta — legal icon, myth, or misconception? When was Magna Carta —1215, say the historians, the lawyers (were they to agree) might say 1297. In this talk Dr Nigel Jamieson, Faculty of Law at the University of Otago discusses what Magna Carta might mean for us today — being in Latin most modernists would shrug it off; some cynics say it means nothing much, since it’s only called the Great Charter because in 1215 they couldn’t text it down to twenty words; others say it’s not for us today because we’re far more up with the political play; and then there are those today who extol it to divert our attention away from the fact that they’re fiddling the books behind our backs. 21 July 2015

Faculty of Law: Against Written Constitutionalism (82.18 MB)
Wednesday, 15 July 2015
Professor Jim Allan is the Garrick Professor of Law at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland and previously belonged to the University of Otago Faculty of Law for 11 years. In this talk Professor Allan discusses four key points, what an unwritten constitution amounts to, the point of written constitutionalism and what you are being promised when offered a written constitution. Finally he explains why a written constitution has limited choice and the process of making a decision between a written and unwritten constitution. 15 July 2015

Meet the 2015 Otago Fellows (86.93 MB)
Sunday, 12 July 2015
The 2015 University of Otago Fellows: Louise Wallace (Robert Burns Fellow), John Ward Knox (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Uzoamaka Nwankpa (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Robyn Belton (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. Jennifer Beck who is sharing the University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children’s Writer in Residence, was unable to attend. 12 July 2015

NCPACS & CTPI: Non-Toxic Religion: The Churches in the Peace Movement in 1980’s New Zealand (55.84 MB)
Thursday, 28 May 2015
Reverend Dr Peter Matheson studied in Otago, (History) Edinburgh, and Tübingen (Theology); edited Critic and taught religious history in New College Edinburgh, Otago and Melbourne. He has been active in the peace movement in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Germany and New Zealand and is the author of fifteen books and countless articles on reforming movements, radical and women's history in the Early Modern Period in Germany, and on aspects of New Zealand and Third Reich history. He is a Presbyterian minister and Honorary Fellow of the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Otago. In this talk, he discusses the churches in the peace movement in 1980’s New Zealand. 28 May 2015

NCPACS: Heart and mind in the quest for justice and peace (67.41 MB)
Wednesday, 20 May 2015
Professor Peter Matheson has led a rich life of theological and historical scholarship, reflection, pastoral care and radical activism. He has urged Churches and States in the UK, Germany and New Zealand to confront violence and war and to work for peace, justice and a more compassionate world while also engaging with many of the major issues of the 20th century. In this talk with Professor Kevin Clements, he discusses his life growing up, his experiences in peacemaking and the heart and mind in the quest for justice. 20 May 2015

NCPACS: Public Conversation with Kennedy Graham, Green Party MP (68.37 MB)
Wednesday, 13 May 2015
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Dr Kennedy Graham discusses the subject of 'Human Security and Global Order: A 21st Century Agenda'. Kennedy Graham served in the New Zealand Foreign Service for 16 years, and has lectured on International Politics and International Law at both the University of Canterbury and Victoria University. He was elected to Parliament for the Greens in 2008 and re-elected in 2011, and holds portfolios of Global Affairs, Defence and Disarmament, and Constitutional Affairs. 13 May 2015

IPL: Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history (66.28 MB)
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
Professor Takashi Shogimen of the Department of History & Art History delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Reshaping the Baton: The enduring relevance of intellectual history”. 21 April 2015

CTPI: Faith and Reconciliation: Insights from the South African Experience (65.17 MB)
Thursday, 16 April 2015
Piet Meiring, Emeritus Professor of Theology and Missiology at the University of Pretoria, and a former member of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission chaired by Desmond Tutu, speaks about the role of faith and theology in the post-apartheid reconciliation process, and offers insights from the South African experience. 16 April 2015

NCPACS: What constitutes a hero? A discussion with author Linda Hansen (43.45 MB)
Wednesday, 15 April 2015
Linda Hansen is a New Zealand author and professional storyteller whose most recent book, “An Unexpected Hero” tells of a young boy’s encounter with the story of Archibald Baxter and the other conscientious objectors in World War I. Linda has worked extensively in the communications industry, as a lecturer and trainer and in this seminar, aims to challenge participants to reflect on what constitutes a hero. 15 April 2015

Faculty of Law: Advocacy to Expand Autonomy at the End of Life in the US: Evolving Law, Medicine and Policy (51.40 MB)
Tuesday, 17 March 2015
Professor Kathryn Tucker, Executive Director of The Disability Rights Legal Center, Los Angeles, discusses the rights of terminally ill patients to make choices to ensure a dying process that is consistent with their values and beliefs; these rights have been rapidly evolving in the US. Professor Tucker, a veteran of nearly every effort to protect and expand end of life choice in the US for more that two decades, will share insight on advocacy strategies, progress, challenges and predictions. She also discusses advocacy in the courthouse, the statehouse and in various policy forums. 17 March 2015

Faculty of Law: Global Animal Law and New Project (53.12 MB)
Monday, 16 March 2015
In this talk, Sabine Brels explores these questions in providing a global overview of animal law at three levels: National, European and International. What is animal law, where does it come from, and how is it evolving? Why can we say that it is progressing worldwide? What are its main strengths and weaknesses in order to protect the welfare of animals against cruelty and suffering, either legally or illegally perpetrated? She also looks at current efforts to set up a universal protection of animal welfare. Lastly, she presents the new Global Animal Law (GAL) Project, aiming to improve the law for animals all around the world. 16 March 2015

Matariki Humanities Colloquium 2014: Communicating the Humanities: a perspective from the University of Otago (74.49 MB)
Monday, 8 December 2014
This lecture, given by Professor Tony Ballantyne, Head of the Department of History and Art History, University of Otago, explores some of the challenges and opportunities that are facing scholars in the Humanities in New Zealand. It is particularly concerned with questions of communication, from the classroom to policy debates, from the changing infrastructure for publication and review to questions of language itself. In exploring these issues, it argues for the continued importance of some key aspects of the traditional idea of the University (especially 'the lecture'), makes the case for a much more co-ordinated drive to make Humanities research accessible and also identifies some significant ways forward for the Humanities in New Zealand in a 'digital age'. 8 December 2014

NCPACS: Prospects for Peace in the Middle East (68.41 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
In 2008, despite active opposition from Jewish groups, the United Nations Human Rights Council appointed Professor Richard Falk to a six-year term as a United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. Professor Falk, Emeritus Professor of International Law at Princeton University, is described as ‘a critical analyst of the role of international law in global politics’. In this talk he discusses prospects for peace in the Middle East. 10 November 2014

NCPACS: A Rights Based Approach to Food Security: An Urgent Challenge (38.67 MB)
Monday, 10 November 2014
Professor Hilal Elver, the UN Special Rapporteur on Right to Food, evaluates the human rights based approach in relation to the right to adequate and healthy food given the reality and impact of the political, environmental and economic challenges of the 21st century. Professor Elver discusses the strong resistance by global market forces to rights based approach to food security as it supposedly interferes with free market principles; and moreover, the right to food as embedded in the Covenant of the Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights is not taken nearly as seriously by many developed countries as is the companion treaty, Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. 10 November 2014

Faculty of Law: From Hypatia to Victor Hugo to Larry and Sergey: “All the world’s knowledge” and Universal Authors’ Rights (57.19 MB)
Thursday, 23 October 2014
Professor Jane C. Ginsburg of the Columbia University School of Law discusses two utopian goals: universal access to knowledge, and universal authors’ rights. She also addresses the clash of utopias epitomised by the Google book-scanning programme and the legal responses it has inspired, including the recent decision by the SDNY upholding Google’s fair use defence. 23 October 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: The role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana campaign (86.44 MB)
Monday, 20 October 2014
In this conversation, panellists Claire Carey, Gregor Morgan and Allan Cumming join Professor Kevin Clements to discuss the role of nonviolence in the Save Aramoana Campaign and the lessons for other communities around the world. 20 October 2014

CTPI: 2014 Quaker Lecture: Standing in this Place (73.36 MB)
Friday, 17 October 2014
In Aotearoa New Zealand many Quakers have been involved in supporting, in diverse ways, the achievement of Maori self-determination, or tino rangatiratanga, as guaranteed by Te Tiriti o Waitangi. In this lecture David James, Jillian Wychel, Murray Short and Linda Wilson, reflect on their own experiences working as allies with Maori. The term working as allies has been used by author Jen Margaret to describe ways that non-indigenous persons work for and support justice for indigenous peoples. Together these four Quakers explore opportunities for Pakeha to work for justice for indigenous people through political and social change in very different ways on a day-to-day basis. 17 October 2014

CCCS: Comparison and Ethics (64.81 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Through discussion of the conceptual metaphor of facing a crossroads, Professor Zhang Longxi of City University of Hong Kong will first establish the necessity of comparison in a general sense, and then will use another conceptual metaphor of killing a Chinese mandarin to explore the ethics of comparison, the issue of the relationship with one’s own group versus relationship, or the lack of it, with outsiders and strangers. As the world becomes increasingly globalized, the physical and psychological distance of human beings from one another is shrinking, and so is the possibility of moral indifference toward others outside one’s own group. This talk is sponsored by the University of Otago Research Theme for Cross-Cultural and Comparative Studies. 10 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Compared to What? (77.86 MB)
Friday, 10 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the fourth and final lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Compared to What? The basic argument is that comparative literature grew from interdisciplinarity in the late eighteenth/early nineteenth centuries, struggled to become an autonomous field and in the process lost its interdisciplinary dimensions, then has been recovering them on new bases, but in an academic environment that is slow to reward risk-taking, unlike the moment immediately after the French Revolution when the gesture of sweeping the slate clean and inventing new sciences came naturally to so many of our predecessors. 10 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: History-Writing and Moral Community in China (85.72 MB)
Thursday, 2 October 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the third lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, History-Writing and Moral Community in China. The Chinese claim, seen with increasing frequency in current soft-power propaganda campaigns, of "5000 years of history" needs to be read in light of a process, over 2000 years long itself, of consensus-building by, of and for historians. How does such a thing as the Chinese Empire become, first an imaginary solution, then an inescapable reality, for a large part of humanity? The arts of rhetorical reading help us to see the successive articulations of what we now know as "China" or "Zhongguo." 2 October 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Doctoring the State: Plato, Hobbes, Humboldt, Hegel, Virchow (46.44 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the second lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series. Western political philosophy, at its beginning (Plato's Republic), introduces an analogy between medical treatment and political reform that, like all metaphors, has consequences on both the supposedly different domains that it incorporates. As long as the metaphor is viewed as a mere analogy, however, the practical relation of medicine to state survival is obscured. The historical development, through a series of political theorists, some of them physicians, explains the in-between status of the field of public health. 22 September 2014

De Carle Lecture 2014: Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction (89.58 MB)
Thursday, 18 September 2014
Professor Haun Saussy, from the University of Chicago and a leading scholar of Chinese and comparative literature, delivers the first lecture in the 2014 De Carle Lecture series, Oral vs. Written: The Curious History of a Cultural Distinction. Though it has become part of our common-sense understanding, the idea of a deep and comprehensive difference between the ways of thinking in predominantly oral and predominantly written cultures dates to the early twentieth century, at the most, and received its impetus from polemics now largely forgotten. By retracing this history, we can work out a genealogy for media studies that will accommodate a larger definition of the human. 18 September 2014

NCPACS: Guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand (61.79 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
In this conversation Tim Ashton, a former member of the Armed Offenders and Special Tactics group in the New Zealand Police force, talks with Professor Kevin Clements about guns, gun control and combating hypermasculinity in Aotearoa-New Zealand. In 1990 Tim was one of the Special Tactics team that shot David Gray in Aramoana. Over the course of his career he has been involved in many incidents where offenders have taken their own lives after killing others, including partners and children. Tim has been shot in the course of his duty and has received two medals for bravery. 15 September 2014

Dr Robin Jackson: “Messy, debatable and unquantifiable”: Championing the Humanities (89.65 MB)
Monday, 8 September 2014
Dr Robin Jackson, Chief Executive and Secretary, British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences, gives a review of some of the challenges and issues that face Humanities in the USA and UK and possibly Australia/New Zealand too. He provides some reflections on the nature of the study of the Humanities which might explain why those challenges arise; and an illustration of various ways in which they can be addressed. 8 September 2014

Faculty of Law: F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture 2014 – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court (49.33 MB)
Thursday, 4 September 2014
Trevor Shiels QC, delivers the 2014 F.W. Guest Memorial Lecture – Multiple Judgments and the New Zealand Supreme Court. 4 September 2014

IPL: Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning (69.58 MB)
Tuesday, 2 September 2014
Professor Tony Harland, Head of the Higher Education Development Centre, delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Slow Scholarship and Deliberate Spaces for Thinking and Learning”. 2 September 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Relationality, Simultaneity, Multiplicity: Theorizing Structures and Flows in Asia (37.13 MB)
Tuesday, 26 August 2014
Devanathan Parthasarathy, Professor of Sociology at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India, presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. Inspired by Doreen Massey’s critique of multiplicity and power-geometry, and Indian anthropological critiques of village studies and urban studies, this talk uses a series of ethnographic illustrations to innovate our ways of comprehending relationality, connectedness, simultaneity, and multiplicity in empirical analysis and theorization of migration, mobility and flows across temporal and spatial units and scales. 26 August 2014

Asian Migrations Research Theme: Circular Migration and Theatres of Accumulation (50.57 MB)
Monday, 25 August 2014
Eric C. Thompson, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Singapore presents this key-note lecture as part of the 'Un-thinking Asian Migrations: Spaces of flows and intersections' symposium. The presentation examines the city as a theatre of accumulation not from the top-down but rather from the bottom-up, that is from the point-of-view of rural-to-urban and transnational migrants for whom cities are sites to accumulate financial as well as social and cultural capital in order to fulfil their own aspirations. Importantly, drawing on examples from Bangkok and Singapore, the site of those aspirations is often elsewhere – not in the city but “back home” in rural areas or other countries. 25 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (52.65 MB)
Thursday, 21 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture six, and the final of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Jerusalem”. 21 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (53.90 MB)
Wednesday, 20 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture five of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Sons of Thunder”. 20 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (47.55 MB)
Tuesday, 19 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture four of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Called to Fish for People”. 19 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (56.94 MB)
Thursday, 14 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture three of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “Zebedee and Sons”. 14 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (63.42 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture two of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The Fishing Industry”. 13 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Do they say what they mean and mean what they say? Some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century (60.97 MB)
Wednesday, 13 August 2014
The Honorable Justice Susan Glazebrook, Supreme Court of New Zealand, delivers this talk on some issues in statutory interpretation in the 21st century. Justice Glazebrook discusses a number of topics including legislation, modern statutes, the purpose of text in legislation, and interpretation. 13 August 2014

Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures 2014: Professor Richard Bauckham – The Sons of Zebedee: the Lives of Two Galilean Fishers (50.75 MB)
Tuesday, 12 August 2014
The Department of Theology and Religion presents lecture one of the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lecture series. Given by Professor Richard Bauckham, Professor Emeritus, University of St Andrews, Scotland, this presentation covers the topic “The World of the Lake of Galilee”. 12 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Human Rights in North Korea. Can things change? (43.65 MB)
Tuesday, 5 August 2014
The Honorable Michael Kirby, AC CMG Australia, presents this talk on Human Rights in North Korea. He discusses a number of issues including the torture of prisoners and other violations of human rights. He also discusses the establishment of the Commission of Enquiry in May 2013 to investigate these issues. 5 August 2014

NCPACS – Remembering Hiroshima: Targeting civilians in war (60.39 MB)
Tuesday, 5 August 2014
The Second World War blurred the distinction between civilians and combatants, thus eliminating one of the central planks of just war theory. Hiroshima reinforced this trend with indiscriminate slaughter of civilians on an industrial scale. Professor Kevin Clements, NCPACS, Dr Yuko Shibata, Languages & Cultures, Professor Robert Patman, Politics, Professor Richard Jackson, NCPACS and Ria Shibata, PhD candidate, NCPACS will explore ways in which innocent civilians have been intentionally and unintentionally targeted in all subsequent modern wars. The forum will discuss current conflicts in the context of Hiroshima. 5 August 2014

Faculty of Law: Litigating Climate Change (53.08 MB)
Wednesday, 30 July 2014
Professor Gerald Torres, Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law at Cornell Law School delivers this talk on 'Litigating Climate Change'. Climate change cases are already being handled by the USA courts. The most prominent are the atmospheric trust cases currently being brought by youth and supported by James Hansen and other scientists. These cases are asking the courts to compel Government to take meaningful action to protect the atmosphere for current and future generations. There have also been liability suits suggested – and at least one filed – over the effects of climate change. Professor Torres discusses the range of cases being brought and suggested in the USA, focusing on the atmospheric trust litigation, and the public trust doctrine which underlies it. 30 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Legal Transplant: Lost in Translation or a Working Misunderstanding (45.08 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Guest Lecturer Mindy Chen-Wishart, a Reader in Contract Law, presents a case study of the transplant of an English doctrine into Singaporean law and explores why the Singaporean courts, while professing to follow it, have applied it to very divergent effect. She compares Western and Confucian value systems—hierarchy versus equality, the positional versus the personal, and collectivism versus individualism—and emphasises the importance of being more aware of the deeply entrenched assumptions of one's own legal system, and of those of other cultures. With the 'changing of the guard' on the world stage, from the West to the East, this is a particularly important time to engage with the Eastern perspective. 24 July 2014

NCPACS and Politics: 2014 Voting Debate: Is it worth voting? (90.25 MB)
Wednesday, 23 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements chairs this debate on the subject ‘Is it worth voting?’ in light of the upcoming election in September. Dr David Clark, MP Dunedin North and Marian Hobbs, former Labour MP, debate the positive argument. Professor Richard Jackson and Dr Bryce Edwards, debate the negative argument. 23 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Marilyn Waring (103.87 MB)
Monday, 21 July 2014
Professor Kevin Clements talks to Marilyn Waring, development consultant, academic, writer and former National Party MP who triggered the 1984 snap election when she refused to support her own government in the vote against an opposition-sponsored anti-nuclear bill. Her best known work, "If Women Counted", also published under the title "Counting for Nothing", describes how economic orthodoxies exclude most of women's productive and reproductive work. In this conversation, Professor Clements seeks to explore what triggered Marilyn's interest in peace, justice and human rights. 21 July 2014

Meet the 2014 Otago Fellows (63.47 MB)
Sunday, 13 July 2014
The 2014 University of Otago Arts Fellows: Majella Cullinane (Robert Burns Fellow), Patrick Lundberg (Frances Hodgkins Fellow), Jeremy Mayall (Mozart Fellow), Louise Potiki Bryant (Caroline Plummer Fellow in Community Dance), and Melinda Szymanik (University of Otago College of Education/Creative New Zealand Children's Writer in Residence) discuss their work and aspects of the creative process. Chaired by Nicholas McBryde, the Director of the Otago Festival of the Arts and former General Manager at Fortune Theatre. 13 July 2014

Faculty of Law: Religious Freedom: managing the tension between faith and equality in a multicultural society (51.67 MB)
Thursday, 10 July 2014
Professor Patrick Parkinson is a professor of law at the University of Sydney and a specialist in family law, child protection and the law of equity and trusts. He is President of the International Society of Family Law and has written many books. In this talk he discusses the conflict between faith organisations and human rights centre advocates after so many years of coexistence and collaboration. He also goes on to discuss his examinations into finding the balance between equality norms and religious freedom in a multicultural society, and the issue of public funding for religious organisations. 10 July 2014

English & Linguistics: Poetry Reading with Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten (73.21 MB)
Wednesday, 9 July 2014
Carla Harryman and Barrett Watten give poetry readings at the Circadian Rhythm Café. Carla Harryman is a poet, essayist, novelist, and playwright. She has published thirteen single-authored works, including 'Adorno's Noise' (Essay Press, 2008) and 'Open Box' (Belladonna, 2007), and has received numerous grants and awards including from the Foundation for Contemporary Art, Opera America, the American Embassy in Romania, and the Fund for Poetry. Barrett Watten is a language-centered poet, critic, editor, and publisher. Some of his publications include 'Bad History', a nonnarrative prose poem “including history,” (Atelos, 1998) and ''Progress/Under Erasure, in a combined edition, (Green Integer,2004). He edited 'This', one of the central publications of the Language school of poetry (1971-82), and co-edited 'Poetics Journal' with Lyn Hejinian, featuring writing on poetics by poets and academics. 9 July 2014

IPL: Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps (53.71 MB)
Tuesday, 8 July 2014
Professor Sean Fitzsimons of the Department of Geography delivers his Inaugural Professorial Lecture: “Is the present the key to the past? Lessons from Antarctica and the Southern Alps”. 8 July 2014

Peace Lecture 2014: Believers of the world - unite (51.58 MB)
Monday, 7 July 2014
Rev Dr Lord Leslie Griffiths presents this year's Otago Tertiary Chaplaincy and Dunedin Abrahamic Interfaith Group Peace lecture “Believers of the world – unite”. Dr Griffiths, the Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, is a Methodist Minister and Superintendent of Wesley’s Chapel, London, and has been a member of the British House of Lords since 2004. His story begins in real poverty in South Wales. He became the youngest ever staff member at the University of Wales, before the call to ordained ministry led him, via Cambridge, to Haiti to work with some of the poorest people on earth. 7 July 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Ed Garcia with Professor Kevin Clements (64.74 MB)
Thursday, 26 June 2014
In this conversation with Professor Kevin Clements, Professor Ed Garcia will reflect on his life's work, on the central dilemmas confronting human rights and peace practitioners and the ethics of peacebuilding. Professor Ed Garcia is a Peace Process Practitioner. He has worked as a peaceworker, specifically as special peace envoy and senior policy advisor at International Alert, a peace-building organisation working in diverse regions of violent conflict. Ed's work has taken him all over Asia, including the Philippines, Indonesia, East Timor, Fiji, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Kashmir. He has worked in conflict zones on the African continent, in Latin America and the Middle East. 14 April 2014

NCPACS: Public Conversation: Professor Kevin Clements with Professor Ed Garcia (89.47 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Before Professor Ed Garcia departed after an extended visit to the Centre, he interviewed Professor Kevin Clements about his life and times. Kevin has had an illustrious career both in academia and as a consultant to a variety of non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations on disarmament, arms control, conflict resolution, development and regional security issues. He has written widely on conflict transformation, peacebuilding, preventive diplomacy and development with a specific focus on the Asia Pacific region. 24 April 2014

NCPACS: Maata Wharehoka in conversation with Professor Kevin Clements (83.65 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Maata Wharehoka, a tikanga Maori advocate, discusses with Professor Kevin Clements about being born in the 1950’s into a large unwealthy family and her work as an activist and advocate. She talks about living a pakeha life with her aunty from the age of 11, her experiences through nursing school and studying, and raising her own family of five children, and the fostering of 45 children. 12 May 2014

Geography: Becoming an African Chief: 40 years of research and community involvement in Sierra Leone (67.53 MB)
Wednesday, 18 June 2014
Professor Tony Binns, University of Otago Ron Lister Chair of Geography, has been bestowed with the most remarkable of honours – being named an African Chief. The Paramount Chief and Section Chiefs of Sandor Chiefdom in Kono District, Eastern Province, Sierra Leone, awarded Professor Binns the titles of ‘Sahr Kayima’ and ‘Chief Manjawah of Sandor’ earlier this year. The honour recognises his work and community involvement over a period of 40 years since he first visited as a PhD student in 1974. He explains his personal journey and how he became interested in Africa and specifically Sierra Leone. He discusses his ongoing research and links with the communities and the significance of the honorary chieftaincy. 11 June 2014

CTPI: Child Poverty: Myths, Misconceptions and Misunderstandings (56.99 MB)
Thursday, 12 June 2014
Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy at VUW, Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Co-chair, Expert Advisory Group (2012) on Solutions to Child Poverty discusses the issue of child poverty: myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings. In discussions about child poverty in New Zealand, one often hears the following claims: ‘There is little or no real child poverty in this country’; ‘The fundamental problem is that some people have too many children’; ‘Many parents are lazy or irresponsible and thus deserve to be poor’; ‘The real problem is not poverty but poor parenting’; ‘We can’t afford to reduce child poverty’; and ‘If we give the poor more money, they will simply waste it’. How valid are such claims? What does the available empirical evidence tell us? What can we learn from the experience of other developed countries? And what ethical principles should guide our policy responses to the challenge of child poverty? 12 June 2014

Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies: An Evening with Adrian McKinty (39.56 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
In this address, we hear the prize-winning author of Fifty Grand and The Cold Cold Ground, Adrian McKinty, read from his new Sean Duffy novel, In the Morning I’ll Be Gone. Adrian is an Irish novelist born in Belfast, Northern Ireland who is primarily known as a writer of crime and mystery novels, and young adult fiction. He is the author of 15 novels and has won a number of awards for his writing since he began in 2001 and has been shortlisted for the Crimewriter’s Association silver dagger award, the Theakston Best British Crime Novel award and the Barry award. 30 April 2014

Faculty of Law: Democracy in Decline (54.27 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professor Jim Allan, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, argues that in five of the world’s oldest democracies, the long-established Anglosphere countries of Canada, New Zealand, the UK, the US and Australia, the past few decades have seen a decline in the extent to which democratic decision-making prevails. He outlines the causes of that decline in democracy and then notes the ways that decline is masked and obfuscated. 16 May 2014