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News from the Department of Psychological Medicine

Te Tari Whakaora Hinengaro Tangata – Karere

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Study of sexual orientation and mental health

Janet Spittlehouse (2019) thumbnail

Thursday, 27 June 2019

Gay, lesbian and bisexual New Zealanders are on average more than twice as likely to experience depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts as heterosexuals, new research shows.

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New Zealanders using more antipsychotics, especially older females

Roger mulder thumb

Friday, 17 August 2018

The prescription of drugs designed to treat conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions has increased in New Zealand by almost 50 per cent in less than a decade, according to the first local study of its kind.

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Cannabis: What's the harm?

cannabis thumbnail

Friday, 25 May 2018

A researcher of the effects of cannabis says any law change to free up the drug’s availability needs to take account of scientifically-robust data showing regular use in young people is associated with a higher risk of mental health issues, use of other substances, and lower levels of achievement.

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First New Zealand study of pathological hoarding

Christchurch campus thumbnail

Monday, 6 November 2017

An estimated 35,000 New Zealanders have clinically severe hoarding behaviour, according to the country’s first snapshot of the debilitating mental illness. A further 56,000 people are likely to have sub-clinical hoarding behaviours that could later develop into a diagnosable condition.

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Larger men earn more, larger women earn less

John Horwood thumb

Monday, 5 October 2015

Men classified as obese according to the Body Mass Index (BMI) make more money per week than those with ‘normal’ BMIs. The opposite applies for women, with obese or overweight women earning less than females with a normal BMI. Larger women are also more likely to be depressed and dissatisfied with their lives than females with a ‘normal’ BMI.

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Quakes' impact on substance use and mental health quantified

Prof David Fergusson thumb

Thursday, 17 July 2014

Cantabrians who experienced serious quake-related adversity are twice as likely to be addicted to smoking and 40 per cent more likely to have mental health conditions such as major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder than people who did not experience the earthquakes, new research shows.

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