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PUBH711 Principles of Epidemiology

Introduction to the principles and practice of epidemiology, including measuring disease frequency; study design and methods; dealing with error, linking exposures with outcomes and critical appraisal of published research.

In the first part of the course, students will learn how they can identify patterns of health or disease in populations to address questions such as 'Which groups of people are more likely to suffer poor health? Is health improving over time? Does health vary by place?' Students will learn about epidemiological study designs and methods, and identify what types of important public health questions they can be used to investigate. Students will learn how to identify and assess potential error in epidemiological studies and how to measure the potential associations between exposures and disease. By the end of the course students will be critically appraising published epidemiological studies and addressing questions such as 'Does this study provide valid evidence about the cause of this disease in this population?'

Paper title Principles of Epidemiology
Paper code PUBH711
Subject Public Health
EFTS 0.1250
Points 15 points
Teaching period(s) 1st Non standard period (24 April 2017 - 16 June 2017), 1st Non standard period (24 April 2017 - 16 June 2017), 1st Non standard period (24 April 2017 - 16 June 2017)
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,346.38
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,562.50

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Restriction
HASC 411, HASX 411, PUBH 701
Limited to
MA, MHealSc, MMLSc, MPH, MSc, DPH, PGDipArts, PGDipHealSc, PGDipMLSc, PGDipPHC, PGCertPH, PGCertPHC
Notes
(i) PGCertPHC and PGDipPHC students require approval from the Board of Studies in Primary Health Care to enrol for this paper. (ii) This paper runs for the second half of the first semester.
Eligibility
Students who have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline or recognised equivalent.
Contact
Wellington Campus: publichealth.uow@otago.ac.nz
Christchurch Campus: publichealth.uoc@otago.ac.nz
Dunedin Campus: postgrad.publichealthdunedin@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Wellington Campus: Professor Diana Sarfati (Overall Convenor)
Christchurch Campus: Dr Phil Hider
Dunedin Campus: Professor Jennie Connor and Associate Professor Patricia Priest
Paper Structure
  1. Hidden patterns: Introducing epidemiology
  2. Telling stories: Describing epidemiology
  3. The time machine and other epidemiological studies
  4. Links in the chain: Measuring associations
  5. Tossing a coin: The role of chance
  6. Confounded! The problem of systematic error
  7. All that glitters is not gold: The role of bias
  8. Who sank the boat? Causality and critical appraisal
Assessment:
  • Assignment 1 35%
  • In-class presentation 10%
  • Exam 55%
Teaching Arrangements
Tuesday morning sessions, 9.00 am - 12.30 pm

Friday morning tutorials, 9.00 am - 11.00 am
Textbooks
Text to be confirmed. Please contact the Department.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • To summarise and interpret the descriptive epidemiology of a public health problem
  • To explain and interpret core epidemiological concepts and to use them to critically appraise epidemiological studies
  • To integrate epidemiological evidence from more than one source and examine the extent to which the evidence supports the existence of a causal association between an exposure (or intervention) and an outcome

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Timetable

1st Non standard period (24 April 2017 - 16 June 2017)

Location
Christchurch
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

1st Non standard period (24 April 2017 - 16 June 2017)

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 09:00-12:50 17
Tuesday 09:00-12:50 18-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
W1 Friday 09:00-10:50 18-22
Friday 09:00-11:50 17

1st Non standard period (24 April 2017 - 16 June 2017)

Location
Wellington
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

Introduction to the principles and practice of epidemiology, including measuring disease frequency; study design and methods; dealing with error, linking exposures with outcomes and critical appraisal of published research.

In the first part of the paper, students will learn how they can identify patterns of health or disease in populations to address questions such as, 'Which groups of people are more likely to suffer poor health?' 'Is health improving over time?' 'Does health vary by place?' Students will learn about epidemiological study designs and methods and identify which types of important public health questions they can be used to investigate. Students will learn how to identify and assess potential error in epidemiological studies and how to measure the potential associations between exposures and disease. By the end of the paper students will be critically appraising published epidemiological studies and addressing questions such as, 'Does this study provide valid evidence about the cause of this disease in this population?'

Paper title Principles of Epidemiology
Paper code PUBH711
Subject Public Health
EFTS 0.1250
Points 15 points
Teaching period(s) 1st Non standard period (23 April 2018 - 15 June 2018), 1st Non standard period (23 April 2018 - 15 June 2018), 1st Non standard period (23 April 2018 - 15 June 2018)
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Restriction
HASC 411, HASX 411, PUBH 701
Limited to
MA, MHealSc, MMLSc, MPH, MSc, DPH, PGDipArts, PGDipHealSc, PGDipMLSc, PGDipPHC, PGCertPH, PGCertPHC
Notes
(i) PGCertPHC and PGDipPHC students require approval from the Board of Studies in Primary Health Care to enrol for this paper. (ii) This paper runs for the second half of the first semester.
Eligibility
Students who have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline or recognised equivalent.
Contact
Wellington Campus: publichealth.uow@otago.ac.nz
Christchurch Campus: publichealth.uoc@otago.ac.nz
Dunedin Campus: postgrad.publichealthdunedin@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Wellington Campus: Dr Melissa McLeod and Dr Ruth Cunningham
Christchurch Campus: Dr Phil Hider (Overall Convenor)
Dunedin Campus: Professor Jennie Connor and Dr Rachel McLean
Paper Structure
  1. Hidden patterns: Introducing epidemiology
  2. Telling stories: Describing epidemiology
  3. The time machine and other epidemiological studies
  4. Links in the chain: Measuring associations
  5. Tossing a coin: The role of chance
  6. Confounded! The problem of systematic error
  7. All that glitters is not gold: The role of bias
  8. Who sank the boat? Causality and critical appraisal
Assessment:
  • Assignment 1 35%
  • In-class presentation 5%
  • Exam 60%
Teaching Arrangements
Tuesday morning sessions, 9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Friday morning tutorials, 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Textbooks
Essential Epidemiology. An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals (3rd Edition) by P Webb, C Bain and A Page. Cambridge University Press (2017).
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • To summarise and interpret the descriptive epidemiology of a public health problem
  • To explain and interpret core epidemiological concepts and to use them to critically appraise epidemiological studies
  • To integrate epidemiological evidence from more than one source and examine the extent to which the evidence supports the existence of a causal association between an exposure (or intervention) and an outcome

^ Top of page

Timetable

1st Non standard period (23 April 2018 - 15 June 2018)

Location
Christchurch
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

1st Non standard period (23 April 2018 - 15 June 2018)

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 09:00-12:50 17-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
W1 Friday 09:00-10:50 17-22

1st Non standard period (23 April 2018 - 15 June 2018)

Location
Wellington
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle