Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Pharmacy staff profile

Dr Shyamal Das

PositionSenior Lecturer
QualificationsMPharm PhD
Research summaryDrug formulation and delivery

Research

My research interests revolve around drug delivery, in particular, respiratory drug delivery of powder formulations and vaccines for treating chronic lung conditions such as COPD, asthma, tuberculosis, lung cancer and lung infections. My aim is to achieve a fundamental knowledge base on solid state characterization processes to understand various pharmaceutical processes such as milling, mixing, spray drying, amorphization, micronization, crystallization, relaxation, dissolution, coating and storage. The knowledge and innovating approaches can be used to develop various conventional and controlled release solid dosage forms such as powders and vaccines for respiratory delivery as well as tablets and capsules for oral delivery.

PhD projects available

Please contact me if you are interested in conducting PhD research in the following areas:

  • Interactions and influence of lung surfactant on dissolution in the lung
  • Solid surface characteristics that influence powder delivery to the lung

Publications

Eedara, B. B., Tucker, I. G., & Das, S. C. (2016). Phospholipid-based pyrazinamide spray-dried inhalable powders for treating tuberculosis. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 506(1-2), 174-183. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.04.038

Das, S. C., & Stewart, P. J. (2016). The influence of lung surfactant liquid crystalline nanostructures on respiratory drug delivery. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 514(2), 465-474. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.06.029

Das, S. C., & Stewart, P. J. (2016). Understanding the respiratory delivery of high dose anti-tubercular drugs. In A. J. Hickey, A. Misra & P. B. Fourie (Eds.), Drug delivery systems for tuberculosis prevention and treatment. (pp. 258-274). Chichester, UK: Wiley. doi: 10.1002/9781118943182.ch13

Das, S. C., Behara, S. R. B., Morton, D. A. V., Larson, I., & Stewart, P. J. (2013). Importance of particle size and shape on the tensile strength distribution and de-agglomeration of cohesive powders. Powder Technology. doi: 10.1016/j.powtec.2013.08.034

Allahham, A., Stewart, P. J., & Das, S. C. (2013). Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 457(1), 101-109. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.09.030

Chapter in Book - Research

Das, S. C., & Stewart, P. J. (2016). Understanding the respiratory delivery of high dose anti-tubercular drugs. In A. J. Hickey, A. Misra & P. B. Fourie (Eds.), Drug delivery systems for tuberculosis prevention and treatment. (pp. 258-274). Chichester, UK: Wiley. doi: 10.1002/9781118943182.ch13

^ Top of page

Journal - Research Article

Eedara, B. B., Tucker, I. G., & Das, S. C. (2016). Phospholipid-based pyrazinamide spray-dried inhalable powders for treating tuberculosis. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 506(1-2), 174-183. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.04.038

Das, S. C., & Stewart, P. J. (2016). The influence of lung surfactant liquid crystalline nanostructures on respiratory drug delivery. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 514(2), 465-474. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.06.029

Das, S. C., Behara, S. R. B., Morton, D. A. V., Larson, I., & Stewart, P. J. (2013). Importance of particle size and shape on the tensile strength distribution and de-agglomeration of cohesive powders. Powder Technology. doi: 10.1016/j.powtec.2013.08.034

Allahham, A., Stewart, P. J., & Das, S. C. (2013). Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 457(1), 101-109. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.09.030

Das, S. C., Larson, I., Morton, D. A. V., & Stewart, P. J. (2011). Determination of the polar and total surface energy distributions of particulates by inverse gas chromatography. Langmuir, 27(2), 521-523. doi: 10.1021/la104135z

More publications...