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Dr Lachy Paterson

lachyBA, PGDipArts (Otago), RSA/Cambridge CELTA, PhD (Otago)

Contact

Office: 3S7, Te Tumu (Richardson Building, South Tower)
Tel: +64 3 479 3972
Email: lachy.paterson@otago.ac.nz

Research

Much of Lachy's primary research involves niupepa (Māori-language newspapers) of the mid nineteenth and early twentieth century. From these and other sources he explores the social, political and religious discourses promulgated within these publications, and has published widely on this topic.

Lachy is currently engaged in collaborating with other Otago scholars in a history of the "book" and print culture in New Zealand. He is also working with a number of international scholars to produce an edited collection on Indigenous textual cultures, and has combined with Angela Wanhalla (History) to collect a wide range of archival material from which to construct an anthology of the “voices” of nineteenth-century Māori women.

Teaching

Supervision

To date Lachy has supervised postgraduate students to completion for three PhD and two Masters of Art theses, five Master of Indigenous Studies research reports; and one BA(Hons) and one PGDipArts dissertation. Lachy is able to supervise a wide range of topics both historical and contemporary, as well as research written in Māori.

Current supervisions

  • Megan Pōtiki - PhD - Historic Language Loss at Ōtākou
  • John Birnie - PhD - Learner-centredness in the teaching of te reo Māori.
  • Kelli Te Maiharoa - PhD - Māori peace-making traditions
  • Matiu Payne - PhD - Tamaiti whāngai in a Ngāti Mutunga context

Research Grants

  • Paterson, L. (2006). Massey University Research Grant: $4950. Project title: Presbyterian Deaconesses within Māori Communities.
  • Paterson, L. (2008). University of Otago Research Grant: $7382. Project title: Women Workers of the Presbyterian Māori Mission.

Distinctions

  • 1999: University of Otago Prestigious Scholarship.
  • 1997: Sir Peter Buck (Te Rangihiroa) Prize in Maori Studies (200-level)
  • 1997: Sir Peter Buck (Te Rangihiroa) Prize in Maori Studies (300-level)

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Publications

Paterson, L. (2006). Colonial discourses: Niupepa Māori 1855-1863. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 250p.

Cooper, A., Paterson, L., & Wanhalla, A. (Eds.). (2015). The lives of colonial objects. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 376p.

Morrison, H., Paterson, L., Knowles, B., & Rae, M. (Eds.). (2012). Mana Māori and Christianity. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia, 356p.

Watson, J., & Paterson, L. (Eds.). (2011). A great New Zealand prime minister? Reappraising William Ferguson Massey. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 176p.

Paterson, L. (2011). Government, Church and Māori responses to mākutu (sorcery) in New Zealand in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Cultural & Social History, 8(2), 175-194. doi: 10.2752/147800411X12949180694308

Authored Book - Research

Paterson, L. (2006). Colonial discourses: Niupepa Māori 1855-1863. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 250p.

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Edited Book - Research

Cooper, A., Paterson, L., & Wanhalla, A. (Eds.). (2015). The lives of colonial objects. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 376p.

Morrison, H., Paterson, L., Knowles, B., & Rae, M. (Eds.). (2012). Mana Māori and Christianity. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia, 356p.

Watson, J., & Paterson, L. (Eds.). (2011). A great New Zealand prime minister? Reappraising William Ferguson Massey. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 176p.

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Chapter in Book - Research

Paterson, L. (2013). Te Hokioi and the legitimization of the Māori nation. In B. Hokowhitu & V. Devdas (Eds.), The fourth eye: Māori media in Aotearoa New Zealand. (pp. 124-142). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Paterson, L. (2012). The rise and fall of women field workers within the Presbyterian Māori mission, 1907-1970. In H. Morrison, L. Paterson, B. Knowles & M. Rae (Eds.), Mana Māori and Christianity. (pp. 179-204). Wellington, New Zealand: Huia.

Paterson, L. (2012). Pakeha or English? Maori understandings of Englishness in the colonial period. In L. Fraser & A. McCarthy (Eds.), Far from 'Home': The English in New Zealand. (pp. 123-143). Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press.

Stevens, S. M., & Paterson, L. (2011). Nga Tamatoa and the rhetoric of brown power: Re-situating collective rhetorics in global colonialism. In D. Payne & D. Desser (Eds.), Teaching writing in globalization: Remapping disciplinary works. (pp. 17-38). Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Paterson, L. (2002). Kiri Mā, Kiri Mangu: The Terminology of race and civilisation in the mid-nineteenth century Maori-language newspapers. In J. Curnow, N. Hepa & J. McRae (Eds.), Rere Atu, Taku Manu! Discovering History, Language and Politics in the Maori-Language Newspapers. (1 ed.) (pp. 78-97). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Moorfield, J. C., & Paterson, L. (2002). Loanwords used in Māori-language newspapers. In J. Curnow, N. Hopa & J. McRae (Eds.), Rere Atu, Taku Manu! Discovering history, language and politics in the Maori-language newspapers. (1 ed.) (pp. 60-77). Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press.

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Journal - Research Article

Paterson, L. (2014). Visual identity in Niupepa Māori nameplates and title-pages: From traditional to aspirational. Script & Print, 38(2), 67-79.

Paterson, L. (2013). Identity and discourse: Te Pipiwharauroa and the South African War, 1899-1902. South African Historical Journal, 65(3), 444-462. doi: 10.1080/02582473.2013.770063

Paterson, L. (2013). 'The similarity of hue constituted no special bond of intimacy between them': Close encounters of the indigenous kind. Journal of New Zealand Studies, 14, 19-40.

Paterson, L. (2011). Government, Church and Māori responses to mākutu (sorcery) in New Zealand in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Cultural & Social History, 8(2), 175-194. doi: 10.2752/147800411X12949180694308

Paterson, L. (2011). Te Whakamahi i te Kupu Rangatiratanga i te Tekau mā Iwa o ngā Rautau. He Pukenga Kōrero, 10(1), 15-22.

Paterson, L. (2011). The Kohimārama Conference of 1860: A contextual reading. Journal of New Zealand Studies, 12, 29-46.

Paterson, L. (2010). Hāwhekaihe: Māori voices on the position of 'half-castes' within Māori society. Journal of New Zealand Studies, 9, 135-156.

Paterson, L. (2010). Print culture and the collective Māori consciousness. Journal of New Zealand Literature, 28(2), 105-129.

Paterson, L. (2008). Māori "Conversion" to the rule of law and nineteenth-century imperial loyalties. Journal of Religious History, 32(2), 216-233. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9809.2008.00708.x

Paterson, L. (2007). Rēweti Kōhere's model village. New Zealand Journal of History, 41(1), 27-44.

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Other Research Output

Wanhalla, A. & Paterson, L. (2015, March). Indigenous women, writing and colonialism. Distinguished Visiting Speaker Series, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. [Research Seminar].

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Other - Edited Journal

Ballantyne, T., Paterson, L., & Wanhalla, A. (Eds.). (2011). Journal of New Zealand Studies, 12. [Journal Editor].

Ballantyne, T., Paterson, L., & Wanhalla, A. (Eds.). (2010). Journal of New Zealand Literature, 28(2). [Guest Editors].

More publications...