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BSc (Alta), JD (Queen's), LLM (Harv)
Barrister and Solicitor of the Province of Alberta (Canada 2005)

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Contact

Email stephen.smith@otago.ac.nz
Office 8th Floor – 8N4

Teaching

I am Course Co-ordinator for LAWS101: The Legal System and I oversee the law students who operate the faculty tutorials for first-year students. Any inquiries or issues related to LAWS101 may be sent to me.

Research interests

International law, international criminal law, legal history, church and state.

Background

I have been a member of the Faculty of Law since 2006 and a Senior Lecturer since 2011. I attended the University of Alberta and studied law at Queen's University in Canada and at Harvard Law School. Prior to joining the faculty, I was a clerk to the justices of the Court of Appeal of Alberta and the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta and a barrister and solicitor in the Province of Alberta. In 2005, I was the Visiting Professor of International and Comparative Law at the University of Oklahoma.

Publications

Briggs, M., & Smith, S. (2022). Criminal law. New Zealand Law Review, 2, 209-236. Journal - Research Article

Smith, S. E. (2022). Is the International Criminal Court Dying? An examination of symptoms. Oregon Review of International Law, 23, 73-96. Journal - Research Article

Smith, S. E. (2020). Political perceptions of Mormon polygamy and the struggle for Utah statehood, 1847-1896. In S. W. McBride, B. M. Rogers & K. A. Erekson (Eds.), Contingent citizens: Shifting perceptions of Latter-day Saints in American political culture. (pp. 128-145). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. doi: 10.7591/cornell/9781501716737.003.0009 Chapter in Book - Research

Smith, S. E. (2019). Has the Queen V Strawbridge been resurrected?: Cameron V R and public welfare offences [Case note]. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 28(2), 389-395. Journal - Research Other

Fowler, R., & Smith, S. E. (2019). Lessons from Cambodia: Towards a victims-oriented approach to contextual transitional justice. New Zealand Journal of Public & International Law, 17(1), 93-125. Journal - Research Article

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