Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

HUBS191 Human Body Systems 1

An introduction to the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine and immune systems in the human body.

We all take for granted that our body functions within a normal range whether we are sitting at a desk or climbing through the bush on a hot day. Our body achieves this using the principles of homeostasis. In HUBS 191 understanding these principles provides the foundation for the paper. You will investigate homeostasis from the perspective of movement (Human Movement and Sensation), hormones (Endocrine system) and response to injury (Immune System) using conceptual learning about the structure (Anatomy) and function (Physiology) of these systems. The paper integrates this material to help you understand how and why your body operates as such an efficient machine over such a wide range of conditions.

Paper title Human Body Systems 1
Paper code HUBS191
Subject Human Body Systems
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,018.05
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,500.00

^ Top of page

Restriction
ANAT 120, PHSE 191
Schedule C
Science
Eligibility
Essential for Health Sciences First Year; BSc majors in Anatomy, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Nutrition and Microbiology; and BBiomedSc majors in Functional Human Biology, Infection and Immunity, Reproduction, Genetics and Development, Molecular Basis of Health and Disease, Drugs and Human Health and Nutrition and Metabolism in Human Health.
Contact
Course Administrator: Mr Philip Kelly Professional Practice Fellow
Teaching staff
A variety of experienced lecturers from the Departments of Physiology, Anatomy and Microbiology contribute to this paper.

Teaching Fellows from the Departments of Anatomy, Physiology and Microbiology also teach the laboratory classes, assisted by a large team of demonstrators.

Note: Teaching staff will be updated for 2017. Follow the 'more information' link above for details.
Teaching Arrangements
You will attend 4 lectures each week. Lectures are also video streamed and recorded. You will participate in a 3-hour laboratory session on alternate weeks.
Textbooks
To be confirmed.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Information literacy, Research, Teamwork, self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Paper Structure
The paper includes 50 lectures lasting 50 minutes each, including some lectures that are committed to revision and integration of material previously presented.

Laboratory classes run on a 2-week cycle, with each student attending one 3-hour session. These classes reinforce lecture material, integrate physiological and anatomical concepts and provide the students with a range of skills, such as recording physiological data and dissection skills. Laboratory classes include an exit test, designed to ensure students have gained the knowledge expected of them during the session.

Three guided learning modules (GLMs) are used to reinforce and extend the knowledge gained in lectures, with the students working in their own time.

The lecture blocks will focus on the anatomy and physiology of the following systems in a way that the material can be integrated to understand the role of each in the overall function of the system:
  • Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement
  • Integrating and Coordinating Roles of the Nervous System
  • Endocrine System
  • Immune System
Six laboratory classes will build on your theoretical knowledge and will give you skills in a range techniques:
  • Introductory Lab; includes Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement 1
  • Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement 2; includes skeletal anatomy and joints
  • Anatomy and Physiology of the Nervous System; integrates anatomical and physiological processes of the nervous system
  • Sensory and Motor Physiology; includes peripheral nerve stimulation and sensory coding
  • Principles of Homeostasis and physiological control systems; includes blood glucose and neural control of core body temperature
  • Immunology; includes innate and adaptive immune responses
Learning Outcomes
HUBS 191 gives you the essential building blocks of knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. This knowledge will underpin your further study in a wide range of Health Science disciplines. These include science majors and minors, as well as providing access to a range of Professional Health Science qualifications and Physical Education.

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
L1 Monday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 08:00-08:50 9-14, 17-22
L2 Monday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 08:00-08:50 9-14, 17-22
L3 Monday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 08:00-08:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 08:00-08:50 9-14, 17-22
L4 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-14, 17-22
L5 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-14, 17-22
L6 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-14, 17-22
L7 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-14, 17-22

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Monday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P2 Monday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P3 Monday 14:00-16:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P4 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 10, 12, 14, 19, 21
Friday 09:00-11:50 18
P5 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P6 Tuesday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 14, 19, 21
Friday 14:00-16:50 17
P7 Monday 18:00-20:50 17
Tuesday 18:00-20:50 10, 12, 14, 19, 21
P8 Tuesday 18:00-20:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P9 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P10 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P11 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P12 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P13 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P14 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P15 Thursday 09:00-11:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P16 Thursday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22
P17 Thursday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P18 Thursday 18:00-20:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
P19 Thursday 18:00-20:50 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22

An introduction to the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine and immune systems in the human body.

We all take for granted that our body functions within a normal range whether we are sitting at a desk or climbing through the bush on a hot day. Our body achieves this using the principles of homeostasis. In HUBS 191 understanding these principles provides the foundation for the paper. You will investigate homeostasis from the perspective of movement (Human Movement and Sensation), hormones (Endocrine system) and response to injury (Immune System) using conceptual learning about the structure (Anatomy) and function (Physiology) of these systems. The paper integrates this material to help you understand how and why your body operates as such an efficient machine over such a wide range of conditions.

Paper title Human Body Systems 1
Paper code HUBS191
Subject Human Body Systems
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,038.45
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,680.00

^ Top of page

Restriction
ANAT 120, PHSE 191
Schedule C
Science
Textbooks
Anatomy and Physiology, Patton and Thibodeau, 8th edn., (Elsevier, 2013)
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perpective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
HUBS 191 gives you the essential building blocks of knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. This knowledge will underpin your further study in a wide range of Health Science disciplines. These include science majors and minors, as well as providing access to a range of Professional Health Science qualifications and Physical Education.
Eligibility
Essential for Health Sciences First Year; BSc majors in Anatomy, Physiology, Neuroscience, Human Nutrition and Microbiology; and BBiomedSc majors in Functional Human Biology, Infection and Immunity, Reproduction, Genetics and Development, Molecular Basis of Health and Disease, Drugs and Human Health and Nutrition and Metabolism in Human Health.
Contact
Course Administrator: Mr Philip Kelly Professional Practice Fellow
Teaching staff
A variety of experienced lecturers from the Departments of Physiology, Anatomy and Microbiology contribute to this paper.

Teaching Fellows from the Departments of Anatomy, Physiology and Microbiology also teach the laboratory classes, assisted by a large team of demonstrators.

Note: Teaching staff will be updated for 2018. Follow the 'More information' link above for details.
Paper Structure
Human Body Systems I - HUBS 191

Course Structure

This paper introduces the fundamental concepts of the disciplines of anatomy, physiology and immunology. Specific topics studied include homeostasis; the musculoskeletal, nervous and endocrine systems; and immunology.

The prescribed text is Anatomy and Physiology, Patton and Thibodeau, 8th edn., (Elsevier, 2013). Self-directed learning is an important aspect of this paper, and students are expected to prepare for lectures by reading specified sections from the text.

Teaching Hours: There are a total of 68 hours of formal teaching, split between lectures (50 hours) and laboratories (18 hours).

Lectures: There are four 1-hour lectures each week, and the paper runs for the entire semester. Four 'revision and integration' lectures are held during the semester. Lectures are delivered by staff members from the departments of Anatomy, Physiology and Immunology. Lectures are interlinked, and videorecordings and livestreaming are available to students via Blackboard.

Laboratories: One 3-hour laboratory each fortnight (total of six lab sessions). All laboratories are compulsory and are terms requirements.

Guided Learning Modules (GLMs): Students are provided online GLM documents to work through in their own time before completing an online test via Blackboard. There are four GLMs in HUBS 191, each contributing 2% to the final grade.

Terms Tests: There are two terms tests during the semester. Each consists of 25 multiple-choice questions to be completed within 30 minutes. Attendance at both tests is compulsory to meet terms requirements.

Assessment:
  • Laboratories - 6% (1% each)
  • GLMs - 8% (2% each)
  • Terms Test 1 - 6%
  • Terms Test 2 - 10%
  • Final Exam - 70%
The final examination is three hours in duration and consists of multiple-choice and short- and long-answer written questions. Students must get a minimum of 40% in the final exam in order to pass the paper.

HUBS 191 Curriculum - Lectures

Introduction, Levels of Organisation
  • Introduction to HUBS 191
Homeostatic Principles
  • The importance of the internal environment and the concept of homeostasis
  • Homeostatic control: Physiological control systems
Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement
  • Anatomical terms
  • Bones - Structure of the skeleton
  • Bone tissue - Microscopic structure
  • Bone tissue - Cellular activity
  • Joints - Structures involved in joints
  • Joints - Structures of synovial joints
  • Movement of synovial joints
  • Muscle - Structure and function
  • Muscles - Actions and roles
  • Muscle - Form and concentric action
  • Complex movements
  • Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement: Revision and integration
Integrating and Co-ordinating Roles of the Nervous System
  • Cells and organisation of the nervous system
  • Divisions of the nervous system
  • Anatomy and function of the spinal cord and spinal nerves
  • Support and protection of the nervous system
  • Structure and layout of major brain areas; basic sensory and motor pathways
  • Bioelectricity - Membrane potentials in neurones
  • Bioelectricity - Action potentials in neurones
  • Bioelectricity - The synapse
  • Bioelectricity - Network integration
  • Skeletal muscle: Structure and function
  • Skeletal muscle: Function, energy and types
  • Cardiac and smooth muscle: Comparison of functional differences
  • Sensory functions: Sensory receptors and the somatosensory cortex
  • Somatic control: Voluntary and reflex control of movement
  • Autonomic control: Sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems
  • Integrating and Co-ordinating Roles of the Nervous System: Revision and integration
Endocrine System
  • What are hormones, and how do they work?
  • Pancreatic Islets: How does the body regulate the storage and release of fuel?
  • The pituitary gland and the hypothalamus: What is the connection?
  • How are growth and metabolism controlled?
  • Adrenal glands and stress
  • How does the body regulate basal metabolic rate (BMR) and the concentration of calcium?
  • Homeostasis in action
  • Endocrine: Revision and integration
Immune System
  • Introduction to immunology and the immune system
  • Innate Immunity I: Mechanical and chemical barriers and inflammation and fever
  • Innate Immunity II: Toll-like receptors, phagocytosis and complement
  • Elements of adaptive immunity
  • T lymphocytes (T cells)
  • B Lymphocytes (B cells) and antibodies
  • Antibody-mediated (humoral) immune response
  • Immune responses to bacterial pathogens
  • Immune responses to viral pathogens
  • Allergies, autoimmunity and immunodeficiency
  • Overview Immune Response: Revision and integration
HUBS 191 Curriculum - Laboratories:
  1. Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement 1 Orientation to the HUBS laboratory and Health and Safety; legal and ethical issues; basic human tissue types; anatomical terminology and the human skeleton.
  2. Musculoskeletal Tissues and Movement 2 Structure and functions of joints; selected muscles of the upper and lower limb; dissection of deer knee joint.*
  3. Anatomy and Physiology of the Nervous System Gross and microscopic organisation of the peripheral and central nervous system; neural pathways involved in reflex and voluntary movements.*
  4. Sensory and Motor Physiology Physiology of nervous system; coding of sensory information; properties of sensory receptors for touch and temperature; properties of peripheral nerves and skeletal muscle; recording an EMG; calculation of nerve conduction velocity.
  5. Principles of Homeostasis Physiological control systems; neural control of core body temperature; hormonal control of plasma glucose; neural control of pupillary diameter.
  6. Immunology Innate and adaptive immune responses; how host immune responses can lead to destruction of invading microbes; laboratory measurement of immune responses.
*Please note, during these labs, human cadaveric material will be on display and/or used as demonstration material.
Teaching Arrangements
You will attend four lectures each week. Lectures are also video streamed and recorded. You will participate in a 3-hour laboratory session on alternate weeks.

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
L1 Monday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 08:00-08:50 9-12, 15-22
L2 Monday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 08:00-08:50 9-12, 15-22
L3 Monday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 08:00-08:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 08:00-08:50 9-12, 15-22
L4 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-12, 15-22
L5 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-12, 15-22
L6 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-12, 15-22
L7 Monday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22
Thursday 17:00-17:50 9-13, 15-22
Friday 17:00-17:50 9-12, 15-22

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Monday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P2 Monday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P3 Monday 14:00-16:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P4 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P5 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P6 Tuesday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P7 Tuesday 18:00-20:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P8 Tuesday 18:00-20:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P9 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 10, 12, 15, 19, 21
Friday 09:00-11:50 18
P10 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P11 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 15, 19, 21
Friday 14:00-16:50 17
P12 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P13 Monday 18:00-20:50 17
Wednesday 18:00-20:50 10, 12, 15, 19, 21
P14 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P15 Thursday 09:00-11:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P16 Thursday 09:00-11:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22
P17 Thursday 14:00-16:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P18 Thursday 18:00-20:50 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21
P19 Thursday 18:00-20:50 11, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22