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ANTH209 Special Topic

This paper focuses on a topic in Anthropology.

Paper title Special Topic
Paper code ANTH209
Subject Anthropology
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

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Prerequisite
One of ANTH 103, ANTH 104, ANTH 105, ANTH 106 or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Eligibility
This paper is designed for students with and without strong backgrounds in Anthropology.
Contact
anthropology@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
To be advised
Paper Structure
Internal Assessment: Two short critical essays (1,000 words) on critical issues related to understanding the nature of crime from an anthropological perspective and article/book chapter critiques presented within the required tutorial.

External Assessment: Take-home essay final exam that emphasises understanding and application of course topics and theory. When taking this take-home exam, students will be able to access, review, and use their lecture notes and all the relevant class readings in answering the assigned questions.

The course involves active class participation and students are requested to read required weekly readings before attending class and/or tutorial.
Teaching Arrangements
Taught lectures and tutorials
Textbooks
To be advised
Course outline
This course will focus on developing an understanding of the importance and nature of an anthropological perspective on crime to more fully understand this aspect of human behaviour. A comparative ethnographic and bio-cultural perspective on the various elements and factors that define the role and nature of crime in prehistoric and contemporary human societies will be reviewed. Additionally, an awareness of the anthropological problems and issues related to studying crime in various human societies will be developed.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Communication, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Research, Self-motivation, Global Perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Develop an understanding of the importance and nature of an anthropological perspective on crime in fully understanding this aspect of human behaviour
  • Develop a comparative ethnographic perspective on the various elements and factors that define the role and nature of crime in prehistoric and contemporary human societies
  • Develop an awareness of the anthropological problems and issues related to studying crime in various human societies
  • Develop a working knowledge and application of a biosocial perspective on understanding human nature and behaviour; both its intellectual strengths and shortcomings

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Timetable

Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
None