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PHIL233 Philosophy of Mind and Language

The foundation and development of modern philosophy of mind and language in the second half of the twentieth century, and the radical effects these developments have had on modern analytic philosophy.

This paper is in two halves. The Mind half is about consciousness, thought, perception and action and focuses on the role of our mind's 'directedness' or intentionality in these central aspects of our mental lives. The Language half of the paper looks at a number of themes concerning linguistic meaning and mental content, including classic works by W.V.O. Quine, H.P. Grice and Saul Kripke.

Paper title Philosophy of Mind and Language
Paper code PHIL233
Subject Philosophy
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
One PHIL paper or 72 points
Restriction
PHIL 333, PHIL 224, PHIL 302, PHIL 306, PHIL 324
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
kourken.michaelian@otago.ac.nz and alex.miller@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Convenor and Lecturer: Professor Alex Miller
Lecturer: Dr Kourken Michaelian
Paper Structure
The first half of the paper covers key questions, concepts and theories in the philosophy of mind, including:
  • Dualism
  • Materialism
  • Functionalism
  • Intentionality
  • The nature of consciousness and qualia
The second half of the paper looks at a number of themes concerning linguistic meaning and mental content, including:
  • W.V.O. Quine's famous arguments concerning the indeterminacy of translation
  • H. P. Grice's attempt to account for the notion of linguistic meaning via the notion of speakers' communicative intentions
  • Saul Kripke's exploration (in his Naming and Necessity) of connections between the philosophy of language and mind and issues in metaphysics concerning necessity and contingency
Teaching Arrangements
Two 2-hour classes per week

The classes mix more formal lecture components with less formal seminar components.
Textbooks
Peter Mandik, This is Philosophy of Mind: An introduction (Wiley-Blackwell 2014)

Alexander Miller Philosophy of Language (2nd edition Routledge 2007)
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Ethics, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
The goals for the first half of the paper are
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, the main arguments for and against standard versions of dualism, materialism and functionalism, to be demonstrated in a research essay or exam answers
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, other topics, including intentionality, consciousness and qualia, to be demonstrated in a research essay or exam answers
  • Engagement with PHIL 233/333, demonstrated in written work through engagement with lecture handouts
The goals for the second half the paper are
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, Quine's "argument from below" for indeterminacy of translation, to be determined in a research essay
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, other topics (including Quine's "argument from above", Grice's account of meaning and alternatives, Kripke on Naming and Necessity), to be shown in exam answers
  • Engagement with PHIL 233/333, demonstrated in written work through engagement with lecture handouts

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 13:00-14:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 14:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41

The foundation and development of modern philosophy of mind and language in the second half of the twentieth century, and the radical effects these developments have had on modern analytic philosophy.

This paper is in two halves. The Mind half is about consciousness, thought, perception and action and focuses on the role of our mind's 'directedness' or intentionality in these central aspects of our mental lives. The Language half of the paper looks at a number of themes concerning linguistic meaning and mental content, including classic works by W.V.O. Quine, H.P. Grice and Saul Kripke.

Paper title Philosophy of Mind and Language
Paper code PHIL233
Subject Philosophy
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $868.95
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,656.70

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One PHIL paper or 72 points
Restriction
PHIL 333, PHIL 224, PHIL 302, PHIL 306, PHIL 324
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
kourken.michaelian@otago.ac.nz and alex.miller@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Convenor and Lecturer: Professor Alex Miller
Lecturer: Dr Kourken Michaelian
Paper Structure
The first half of the paper covers key questions, concepts and theories in the philosophy of mind, including:
  • Dualism
  • Materialism
  • Functionalism
  • Intentionality
  • The nature of consciousness and qualia
The second half of the paper looks at a number of themes concerning linguistic meaning and mental content, including:
  • W.V.O. Quine's famous arguments concerning the indeterminacy of translation
  • H. P. Grice's attempt to account for the notion of linguistic meaning via the notion of speakers' communicative intentions
  • Saul Kripke's exploration (in his Naming and Necessity) of connections between the philosophy of language and mind and issues in metaphysics concerning necessity and contingency
Teaching Arrangements
Two 2-hour classes per week

The classes mix more formal lecture components with less formal seminar components.
Textbooks
Peter Mandik, This is Philosophy of Mind: An introduction (Wiley-Blackwell 2014)

Alexander Miller Philosophy of Language (2nd edition Routledge 2007)
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Ethics, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
The goals for the first half of the paper are
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, the main arguments for and against standard versions of dualism, materialism and functionalism, to be demonstrated in a research essay or exam answers
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, other topics, including intentionality, consciousness and qualia, to be demonstrated in a research essay or exam answers
  • Engagement with PHIL 233/333, demonstrated in written work through engagement with lecture handouts
The goals for the second half the paper are
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, Quine's argument from below for indeterminacy of translation, to be determined in a research essay
  • Understanding of, and skilled response to, other topics (including Quine's argument from above, Grice's account of meaning and alternatives, Kripke on Naming and Necessity), to be shown in exam answers
  • Engagement with PHIL 233/333, demonstrated in written work through engagement with lecture handouts

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 14:00-15:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 14:00-14:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22