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PHSI232 Electromagnetism and Optics

Classical electromagnetic theory is developed in terms of Maxwell’s equations, and applied to the description of dielectric and magnetic materials. The wave theory of optics, originating from electromagnetism, is explored with examples including interference, diffraction and coherence.

This paper develops the classical theory of electromagnetism in terms of Maxwell's equations, both in vacuum and in media. A major emphasis is placed on the use of vector calculus and its related integral theorems to solve for electric and magnetic fields. The formal similarity of electrostatic and magnetostatic problems is shown, and principles of symmetry and superposition are used to facilitate solution. Electromagnetic induction and the energy of electromagnetic fields are introduced. Fundamental concepts in optics are developed in terms of electromagnetism, including light propagation, interference, reflection, refraction, transmission at interfaces, and applications in diffraction.

Paper title Electromagnetism and Optics
Paper code PHSI232
Subject Physics
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,018.05
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,320.00

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Prerequisite
PHSI 132 and (MATH 160 or MATH 170)
Restriction
PHSI 262
Recommended Preparation
MATH 170
Schedule C
Science
Notes
It is strongly recommended that students taking PHSI231 or PHSI232 have passed MATH170 or are enrolled in MATH170 and have a B grade or better in MATH160.
Contact
niels.kjaergaard@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Course Co-ordinator:Associate Professor Niels Kjaergaard
Dr Harald Schwefel
Textbooks
Introduction to Electrodynamics, D.J. Griffiths, (Fourth edition), Pearson.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
After completing this paper students will be able to:
  1. State the time-dependent Maxwell's equations in vacuum and in media and understand their significance in providing the framework of classical electromagnetism
  2. Present written, logical and clear solutions to problems in electrostatics, magnetostatics, induced electromagnetic fields and basic wave optics
  3. Solve steady state problems in electromagnetism by utilising symmetries, vector calculus and its integral theorems
  4. Solve simple problems for induced electromagnetic fields using both differential and integral forms of Maxwell's equations
  5. Understand foundational concepts of optics in terms of Maxwell's equations and be able to solve simple problems of wave propagation, diffraction and interference

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Tuesday 11:00-11:50 28-34, 36-41
T2 Friday 12:00-12:50 28-34, 36-41

Workshop

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
A1 Wednesday 14:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41
A2 Thursday 14:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41

Classical electromagnetic theory is developed in terms of Maxwell’s equations, and applied to the description of dielectric and magnetic materials. The wave theory of optics, originating from electromagnetism, is explored with examples including interference, diffraction and coherence.

This paper develops the classical theory of electromagnetism in terms of Maxwell's equations, both in vacuum and in media. A major emphasis is placed on the use of vector calculus and its related integral theorems to solve for electric and magnetic fields. The formal similarity of electrostatic and magnetostatic problems is shown, and principles of symmetry and superposition are used to facilitate solution. Electromagnetic induction and the energy of electromagnetic fields are introduced. Fundamental concepts in optics are developed in terms of electromagnetism, including light propagation, interference, reflection, refraction, transmission at interfaces, and applications in diffraction.

Paper title Electromagnetism and Optics
Paper code PHSI232
Subject Physics
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
PHSI 132 and (MATH 160 or MATH 170)
Restriction
PHSI 262
Recommended Preparation
MATH 170
Schedule C
Science
Notes
It is strongly recommended that students taking PHSI231 or PHSI232 have passed MATH170 or are enrolled in MATH170 and have a B grade or better in MATH160.
Learning Outcomes
After completing this paper students will be able to:
  1. State the time-dependent Maxwell's equations in vacuum and in media and understand their significance in providing the framework of classical electromagnetism
  2. Present written, logical and clear solutions to problems in electrostatics, magnetostatics, induced electromagnetic fields and basic wave optics
  3. Solve steady state problems in electromagnetism by utilising symmetries, vector calculus and its integral theorems
  4. Solve simple problems for induced electromagnetic fields using both differential and integral forms of Maxwell's equations
  5. Understand foundational concepts of optics in terms of Maxwell's equations and be able to solve simple problems of wave propagation, diffraction and interference
Contact
niels.kjaergaard@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Course Co-ordinator:Associate Professor Niels Kjaergaard
Dr Harald Schwefel
Textbooks
Introduction to Electrodynamics, D.J. Griffiths, (Fourth edition), Pearson.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.

^ Top of page

Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 10:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Tuesday 11:00-11:50 28-34, 36-41
T2 Friday 16:00-16:50 28-34, 36-41

Workshop

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
A1 Wednesday 14:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41
A2 Thursday 14:00-15:50 28-34, 36-41