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HIST123 Revolutions

An examination of the ways in which revolutions have transformed the world.

Revolutionary movements have shaped the world we live in. This paper explores these movements, providing students with an understanding of what drives popular uprisings and how revolutionary change has shaped the modern world. This understanding will be developed through case studies of particular revolutions, such as the French, Russian and Chinese Revolutions.

The paper is essential for students majoring in History, and complements studies in a wide range of subjects, including law, politics, psychology, anthropology, and sociology.

Paper title Revolutions
Paper code HIST123
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $904.05
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,954.75

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Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact

brian.moloughney@otago.ac.nz

Teaching staff

Coordinator: Professor Brian Moloughney
Lecturers: Professor Takashi Shogimen, Associate Professor Mark Seymour, Professor Angela McCarthy and Professor Brian Moloughney

Textbooks

There is no textbook for this course.

Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of political, economic and social aspects of revolutions, and the decisive role these have played in shaping the modern world.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of different theories and interpretations of revolution, and of the relationship between revolution and modernity.
  • Display communication skills both in written form and verbally, through essay writing and the engagement with ideas and issues within the classroom and beyond.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of research skills through locating, evaluating and effectively using ideas and information.

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Monday 13:00-13:50 9-13, 19-22
Wednesday 13:00-13:50 9-12, 18-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
A1 Monday 15:00-15:50 11-12, 19, 21
A2 Monday 16:00-16:50 11-12, 19, 21
A3 Wednesday 14:00-14:50 11-12, 19, 21
A4 Friday 10:00-10:50 11-12, 19, 21
A5 Friday 11:00-11:50 11-12, 19, 21
A6 Thursday 12:00-12:50 11-12, 19, 21

An examination of the ways in which revolutions have transformed the world.

Revolutionary movements have shaped the world we live in. This paper explores these movements, providing students with an understanding of what drives popular uprisings and how revolutionary change has shaped the modern world. This understanding will be developed through case studies of particular revolutions, such as the French, Russian and Chinese Revolutions.

The paper is essential for students majoring in History, and complements studies in a wide range of subjects, including law, politics, psychology, anthropology, and sociology.

Paper title Revolutions
Paper code HIST123
Subject History
EFTS 0.15
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2021 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact

brian.moloughney@otago.ac.nz

Teaching staff

Co-ordinator: Professor Brian Moloughney
Lecturers: Associate Professor Mark Seymour
Associate Professor Alex Trapeznik
Professor Brian Moloughney

Textbooks

There is no textbook for this course.

Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this paper will be able to

  • Demonstrate knowledge of political, economic and social aspects of revolutions, and the decisive role these have played in shaping the modern world
  • Demonstrate an understanding of different theories and interpretations of revolution, and of the relationship between revolution and modernity
  • Display communication skills both in written form and verbally, through essay writing and the engagement with ideas and issues within the classroom and beyond
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of research skills through locating, evaluating and effectively using ideas and information

^ Top of page

Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Monday 13:00-13:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 13:00-13:50 28-34, 36-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
A1 Monday 15:00-15:50 30, 33, 38-39
A2 Monday 16:00-16:50 30, 33, 38-39
A3 Wednesday 14:00-14:50 30, 33, 38-39
A4 Thursday 12:00-12:50 30, 33, 38-39
A5 Friday 10:00-10:50 30, 33, 38-39
A6 Friday 11:00-11:50 30, 33, 38-39