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Ben GraySenior Lecturer Beyond the Bar & PDE Module Convenor 

Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice 

Background and Interests

Ben Gray joined the Department in 2006 as a senior lecturer in General Practice. He is an Otago graduate from the first class at the Wellington Clinical School. He has worked as a GP for more than 30 years first in Waitara Taranaki and most recently at Newtown Union Health Service (NUHS). Waitara had a significant Māori population and NUHS has a very diverse population with significant numbers of refugees from many parts of the world. The practice has developed significant strengths in long term condition management, cross cultural care and interprofessional practice. He completed a Masters in Bioethics and Health Law May 2014 with a dissertation titled “How does the concept of cultural competence affect the practice of bioethics and health law”. He is active in the Australasian Association of Bioethics and Health Law and convened the AABHL conference in Wellington in 2015 “Working with Diversity”

Teaching Activities

Undergraduate Medical Education

  • Module Convener for Professional Development and Ethics (PDE) for years 4, 5 and Trainee Interns
  • Teaching lectures and tutorials on professionalism and ethics
  • Teaching in the 4th year General Practice Module on long term conditions
  • Teaching in the 5th year General Practice Module on teamwork and interprofessionalism 

Postgraduate Education

  • Teaching in postgraduate courses on cultural competence
  • Convenor of the the Pacific Health paper

Research Activities

Ben’s research interests are diverse. Current main focus is around the use of interpreters in medical consultations and Cultural Competence. Other interests are Long Term Condition management, interprofessional practice and reflective practice in undergraduate education.

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Publications

Gray, B., & Brunger, F. (2018). (Mis)understandings and uses of ‘culture’ in bioethics deliberations over parental refusal of treatment: Children with cancer. Clinical Ethics, 13(2), 55-66. doi: 10.1177/1477750917738109

Gray, B., Hilder, J., & Donaldson, H. (2011). Why do we not use trained interpreters for all patients with limited English proficiency? Is there a place for using family members? Australian Journal of Primary Health, 17, 240-249. doi: 10.1071/PY10075

Gray, B., Hilder, J., Macdonald, L., Tester, R., Dowell, A., & Stubbe, M. (2017). Are research ethics guidelines culturally competent? Research Ethics, 13(1), 23-41. doi: 10.1177/1747016116650235

Gray, B. (2018). Culture, cultural competence and the cross-cultural consultation. Journal of Paediatrics & Child Health, 54(4), 343-345. doi: 10.1111/jpc.13769

Hilder, J., Gray, B., Dowell, A., Macdonald, L., Tester, R., & Stubbe, M. (2017). ‘It depends on the consultation’: Revisiting use of family members as interpreters for general practice consultations – when and why? Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23, 257-262. doi: 10.1071/PY16053

Other Research Output

Hilder, J., Gray, B., & Stubbe, M. (2017). Working with interpreters for primary care practitioners: An e-learning module. Applied Research on Communication in Health Group, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://www.otago.ac.nz/wellington/e-learning/arch/story_html5.html

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Chapter in Book - Research

Gray, B., Hilder, J., Macdonald, L., Tester, R., Dowell, A., & Stubbe, M. (2017). A New Zealand perspective on providing healthcare for patients with limited English proficiency. In E. A. Jacobs & L. C. Diamond (Eds.), Providing health care in the context of language barriers. (pp. 189-209). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.

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Journal - Research Article

Gray, B., & Brunger, F. (2018). (Mis)understandings and uses of ‘culture’ in bioethics deliberations over parental refusal of treatment: Children with cancer. Clinical Ethics, 13(2), 55-66. doi: 10.1177/1477750917738109

Gray, B. (2017). How should we respond to non-dominant healing practices, the example of homeopathy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, 14(1), 87-96. doi: 10.1007/s11673-016-9760-y

Hilder, J., Gray, B., Dowell, A., Macdonald, L., Tester, R., & Stubbe, M. (2017). ‘It depends on the consultation’: Revisiting use of family members as interpreters for general practice consultations – when and why? Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23, 257-262. doi: 10.1071/PY16053

Gray, B., Hilder, J., Macdonald, L., Tester, R., Dowell, A., & Stubbe, M. (2017). Are research ethics guidelines culturally competent? Research Ethics, 13(1), 23-41. doi: 10.1177/1747016116650235

Moore, J., Stokes, T., & Gray, B. (2016). The New Zealand Coroners Amendment Bill's proposed approach to health care-related deaths that are reportable to the coroner. Journal of Law & Medicine, 23, 557-570.

Gray, B. (2016). Clinical ethics cultural competence and the importance of dialogue: A case study. Clinical Research & Bioethics, 7(1), 256. doi: 10.4172/2155-9627.1000256

Gray, B., & Gillett, G. (2014). Was the tragedy of Tovia Laufau caused by an absence of trust? Journal of Law & Medicine, 21(4), 780-788.

Parry, R., Jones, B., Gray, B., & Ingham, T. (2014). Applying a Māori-centred consultation approach for engaging with Māori patients: An undergraduate medical student case study. Journal of Primary Health Care, 6(3), 254-260.

Gray, B., Stanley, J., Stubbe, M., & Hilder, J. (2011). Communication difficulties with limited English proficiency patients: Clinician perceptions of clinical risk and patterns of use of interpreters. New Zealand Medical Journal, 124(1342). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/124-1342/4861/content.pdf

Gray, B., Hilder, J., & Donaldson, H. (2011). Why do we not use trained interpreters for all patients with limited English proficiency? Is there a place for using family members? Australian Journal of Primary Health, 17, 240-249. doi: 10.1071/PY10075

Yang, C.-F., & Gray, B. (2008). Bilingual medical students as interpreters: What are the benefits and risks? New Zealand Medical Journal, 121(1282). Retrieved from http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/121-1282/3273/content.pdf

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Journal - Research Other

Gray, B. (2018). Culture, cultural competence and the cross-cultural consultation. Journal of Paediatrics & Child Health, 54(4), 343-345. doi: 10.1111/jpc.13769

Gray, B. (2017). The Cynefin framework: Applying an understanding of complexity to medicine. Journal of Primary Health Care, 9(4), 258-261. doi: 10.1071/HC17002

Gray, B., & Hardt, E. J. (2017). A comparison of the use of interpreters in New Zealand and the US. New Zealand Medical Journal, 130(1456), 70-75. Retrieved from http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal

Gray, B. (2016). Culturally competent clinical ethics: Case study response: Response to case study: A family requests that their grandmother, who does not speak English, is not informed of her terminal diagnosis. Clinical Ethics, 11(4), 214-216. doi: 10.1177/1477750916657668

Gray, B. (2015). Lead maternity care needs to be embedded in general practice: The 'yes' case. Journal of Primary Health Care, 7(1), 71-73. [Commentary].

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Awarded Masters Degree

Gray, B. (2014). How does the concept of cultural competence affect the practice of bioethics and health law (MBHL). University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5472

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