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Elaine Hargreaves

Elaine Hargreaves ImageSenior Lecturer
BSc(Hons)(Glasgow) PhD(Wales)
Tel +64 3 479 8941
Email elaine.hargreaves@otago.ac.nz

Background

Elaine Hargreaves (Nee Rose) is very proudly Scottish and joined the School in 2002 after completing her PhD in Exercise Psychology at the University of Wales, Bangor. Elaine is the School’s Associate Dean Curriculum and serves as an Associate Editor of the European Journal of Sport Sciences and on the Editorial Board of the Applied Journal of Sport Psychology. She is married to Gareth and has two girls and in practicing what she teaches and researches, will regularly be found being physically active in Dunedin’s beautiful outdoors.

Teaching

Research

Elaine’s research speciality is in the psychology of physical activity with a focus on understanding and promoting behaviour change. Her research spans across three main areas:

  1. Applying behaviour change principles in interventions to improve physical activity and other healthy lifestyle behaviours and to explore the psychological mechanisms explaining behaviour change. Current projects include, the Rugby Fans in Training – NZ programme a healthy lifestyle intervention for men based in the professional rugby context funded by the Health Research Council and the development of an intervention to encourage office-based employees to do short bouts of activity after every 30 min of sitting funded by a University of Otago research grant.
  2. The role of affective responses in motivating physical activity behaviour. This work is underpinned by the hypothesis that an individual’s past, ongoing and expected affective experiences of physical activity are integral in determining future behavioural decisions. Elaine is particularly interested in how to structure the exercise experience to maximise positive affective responses and understand the psychological mechanisms through which positive affect impacts on behavioural decisions.
  3. Exploring motivation to adopt and maintain physical activity using the framework of Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985). Recent projects have examined the relationships between autonomous motivation and psychological flexibility and the relationships between need support and autonomous motivation.

Elaine welcomes post-graduate students with an interest in the psychology of physical activity.

Potential students may like to consult the University of Otago scholarships webpage to check eligibility for international and domestic student scholarships.

Postgraduate students

  • Amanda Calder, PhD 2019. The Affect Of Exercise Past, Present, And Future: The Role Of Affective Memory And Affective Forecast In The Affective Response-Physical Activity Behaviour Relation.
  • Matthew Jenkins, PhD 2018. ACTing with Self-Determination: Psychological Flexibility and Motivation for Physical Activity.
  • Kirsty Hayr, MDiet 2018. Perspectives on Integrating Activity Breaks into the Work Day: A Focus Group Study of University of Otago Employees Working in Sedentary Occupations (co-supervisor).
  • Hannah Martin, MDiet 2018. Motivational profiles for eating behaviour and their associations with intuitive eating and body mass index in New Zealand women (co-supervisor).




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Publications

Jenkins, M., Hargreaves, E. A., & Hodge, K. (2019). The role of psychological flexibility in physical activity maintenance. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1123/jsep.2018-0311

Maddison, R., Hargreaves, E. A., Wyke, S., Gray, C. M., Hunt, K., Heke, J. I., … Marsh, S. (2019). Rugby Fans in Training New Zealand (RUFIT-NZ): A pilot randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight men delivered through professional rugby clubs in New Zealand. BMC Public Health, 19, 166. doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-6472-3

Jenkins, M., Hargreaves, E., Rehrer, N., & Falcous, M. (2019). The experiences of electric bike users within the Dunedin community. In S. Mandic & K. Coppell (Eds.), Proceedings of The Active Living and Environment Symposium (TALES): Linking Transport, Health and Sustainability. (pp. 58). Dunedin, New Zealand: University of Otago. [Abstract]

Elsangedy, H. M., Machado, D. G. D. S., Krinski, K., Duarte do Nascimento, P. H., De Amorim Oliveira, G. T., Santos, T. M., Hargreaves, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2018). Let the pleasure guide your resistance training intensity. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 50(7), 1472-1479. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001573

Hargreaves, E. A., Maddison, R., & Marsh, S. (2017). Why do men engage with professional-sport based lifestyle interventions? The case of Rugby Fans in Training-NZ. Proceedings of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting. (pp. 388). ISBNPA. Retrieved from https://www.isbnpa.org

Chapter in Book - Research

Hargreaves, E. A., & Waumsley, J. A. (2013). Psychology of physical activity-related injuries. In M. Arvinen-Barrow & N. Walker (Eds.), The psychology of sport injury and rehabilitation. (pp. 185-198). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.

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Journal - Research Article

Jenkins, M., Hargreaves, E. A., & Hodge, K. (2019). The role of psychological flexibility in physical activity maintenance. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1123/jsep.2018-0311

Maddison, R., Hargreaves, E. A., Wyke, S., Gray, C. M., Hunt, K., Heke, J. I., … Marsh, S. (2019). Rugby Fans in Training New Zealand (RUFIT-NZ): A pilot randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight men delivered through professional rugby clubs in New Zealand. BMC Public Health, 19, 166. doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-6472-3

Elsangedy, H. M., Machado, D. G. D. S., Krinski, K., Duarte do Nascimento, P. H., De Amorim Oliveira, G. T., Santos, T. M., Hargreaves, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2018). Let the pleasure guide your resistance training intensity. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 50(7), 1472-1479. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001573

Hargreaves, E. A., Mutrie, N., & Fleming, J. D. (2016). A web-based intervention to encourage walking (StepWise): Pilot randomized controlled trial. JMIR Research Protocols, 5(1), e14. doi: 10.2196/resprot.4288

Dawson, A. M., Brown, D. A., Cox, A., Williams, S. M., Treacy, L., Haszard, J., Meredith-Jones, K., Hargreaves, E., Taylor, B. J., Ross, J., & Taylor, R. W. (2014). Using motivational interviewing for weight feedback to parents of young children. Journal of Paediatrics & Child Health, 50(6), 461-470. doi: 10.1111/jpc.12518

Lonsdale, C., Hodge, K., Hargreaves, E. A., & Ng, J. Y. Y. (2014). Comparing sport motivation scales: A response to Pelletier et al. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 15(5), 446-452. doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.03.006

Hodge, K., Hargreaves, E. A., Gerrard, D., & Lonsdale, C. (2013). Psychological mechanisms underlying doping attitudes in sport: Motivation and moral disengagement. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 35(4), 419-432.

Hargreaves, E. A., & Stych, K. (2013). Exploring the peak and end rule of past affective episodes within the exercise context. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 14(2), 169-178. doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2012.10.003

Rose, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2012). Exercise experience influences affective and motivational outcomes of prescribed and self-selected intensity exercise. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 22(2), 265-277. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01161.x

Parfitt, G., Blisset, A., Rose, E. A., & Eston, R. (2012). Physiological and perceptual responses to affect-regulated exercise in healthy young women. Psychophysiology, 49(1), 104-110. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2011.01287.x

Rose, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2010). Pleasant for some and unpleasant for others: A protocol analysis of the cognitive factors that influence affective responses to exercise. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition & Physical Activity, 7. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-7-15

Taylor, R. W., Brown, D., Dawson, A. M., Haszard, J., Cox, A., Rose, E. A., Taylor, B. J., Meredith-Jones, K., Treacy, L., Ross, J., & Williams, S. M. (2010). Motivational interviewing for screening and feedback and encouraging lifestyle changes to reduce relative weight in 4-8 year old children: Design of the MInT study. BMC Public Health, 10, 271. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-271

Lonsdale, C., Hodge, K., & Rose, E. (2009). Athlete burnout in elite sport: A self-determination perspective. Journal of Sports Sciences, 27(8), 785-795. doi: 10.1080/02640410902929366

Lonsdale, C., Hodge, K., & Rose, E. A. (2008). The Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ): Instrument development and initial validity evidence. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 30(3), 323-355.

Rose, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2008). Can the feeling scale be used to regulate exercise intensity? Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40(10), 1852-1860.

Anglem, N., Lucas, S. J. E., Rose, E. A., & Cotter, J. D. (2008). Mood, illness and injury responses and recovery with adventure racing. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, 19(19), 30-38.

Rose, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2007). A quantitative analysis and qualitative explanation of the individual differences in affective responses to prescribed and self-selected exercise intensities. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 29, 281-309.

Lonsdale, C., Hodge, K., & Rose, E. A. (2006). Pixels vs. paper: Comparing online and traditional survey methods in sport psychology. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 28, 100-108.

Parfitt, G., Rose, E. A., & Burgess, W. M. (2006). The psychological and physiological responses of sedentary individuals to prescribed and preferred intensity exercise. British Journal of Health Psychology, 11, 39-53.

Forsyth, G., Handcock, P., Rose, E., & Jenkins, C. (2005). Fitness instructors: How does their knowledge on weight loss measure up? Health Education Journal, 64(2), 154-167.

Rose, E. A., Parfitt, G., & Williams, S. (2005). Exercise causality orientations, behavioural regulation for exercise and stage of change for exercise: Exploring their relationships. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 6, 399-414.

Rose, E. A., Markland, D., & Parfitt, G. (2001). The development and initial validation of the exercise causality orientation scale. Journal of Sports Sciences, 19(6), 445-462.

Parfitt, G., Rose, E. A., & Markland, D. (2000). The effect of prescribed and preferred intensity exercise on psychological affect and the influence of baseline measures of affect. Journal of Health Psychology, 5(2), 231-240.

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Journal - Research Other

Ekkekakis, P., Hargreaves, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2013). Introduction to the special section on affective responses to exercise. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 14(5), 749-750. doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.04.010

Ekkekakis, P., Hargreaves, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2013). Envisioning the next fifty years of research on the exercise-affect relationship [Invited]. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 14(5), 751-758. doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.04.007

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Journal - Professional & Other Non-Research Articles

Rose, E. A. (2002). Motivational and affective responses to exercise: Issues for adherence and the role of causality orientations. Health, Physical Education & Recreation, 15, 33-34.

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Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Jenkins, M., Hargreaves, E., Rehrer, N., & Falcous, M. (2019). The experiences of electric bike users within the Dunedin community. In S. Mandic & K. Coppell (Eds.), Proceedings of The Active Living and Environment Symposium (TALES): Linking Transport, Health and Sustainability. (pp. 58). Dunedin, New Zealand: University of Otago. [Abstract]

Hargreaves, E. A., Maddison, R., & Marsh, S. (2017). Why do men engage with professional-sport based lifestyle interventions? The case of Rugby Fans in Training-NZ. Proceedings of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting. (pp. 388). ISBNPA. Retrieved from https://www.isbnpa.org

Jenkins, M., Hodge, K., & Hargreaves, E. (2017). Using single-case designs to assess physical activity interventions: Observations and lessons learned from a multiple-baseline design study. Proceedings of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting. (pp. 485). ISBNPA. Retrieved from https://www.isbnpa.org

Hargreaves, E., Maddison, R., & Marsh, S. (2017). Rugby Fans in Training: A healthy lifestyle programme for overweight men. Proceedings of the 7th Activity and Nutrition Aotearoa Conference. (pp. 63). Retrieved from https://ana.org.nz

Calder, A., & Hargreaves, E. (2017). Jogging ones memory: The role of affective memories and affective forecasts on future exercise behaviour. Proceedings of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting. (pp. 532). ISBNPA. Retrieved from https://www.isbnpa.org

Jenkins, M., Hargreaves, E. A., & Hodge, K. (2016). Exploring the role of acceptance and commitment in physical activity motivation and behaviour. Proceedings of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 15th Annual Scientific Meeting. (pp. 663). ISBNPA. Retrieved from https://www.isbnpa.org

Jenkins, M., Hargreaves, E., & Hodge, K. (2016). Acceptance, commitment and motivation: Exploring the role of mindfulness in physical activity behaviour. Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health (ISPAH). (pp. 539). Retrieved from http://www.ispah2016.org/

Rehrer, N. J., Novis, B. J., & Hargreaves, E. A. (2014). Cardiovascular benefits of commuter cycling. Proceedings of the 2 Walk and Cycle Conference: Communities on the Move. Retrieved from http://www.2walkandcycle.org.nz/

Novis, B. J., Hargreaves, E. A., & Rehrer, N. J. (2012). Effects of 10 wk commuter cycling on cardiovascular fitness, lipids, insulin sensitivity and body composition. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44(5, Suppl. 2), (pp. 917). doi: 10.1249/01.mss.0000417529.22755.ed

Taylor, R., Hargreaves, E., Meredith-Jones, K., Brown, D., Cox, A., Treacy, L., Dawson, A., Haszard, J., & Williams, S. (2012). Motivation for healthy lifestyles and weight status in a large sample of 4–8-year-old children: The MInT study. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 6(Suppl. 1), (pp. 24-25). doi: 10.1016/j.orcp.2012.08.050

Hart, I., Mainvil, L., & Hargreaves, E. (2011). Transtheoretical model mediators of fruit and vegetable intakes in the 5+YourWay study. Australasian Medical Journal, 4(12), (pp. 733). [Abstract]

Mainvil, L., Hart, I., & Hargreaves, E. (2011). Transtheoretical model mediators of fruit and vegetable intakes in The 5+YourWay® Study. Proceedings of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) 10th Annual Meeting. Retrieved from http://isbnpa.eproceedings.com.au/#

Hargreaves, E. A., & Sheppard, K. E. (2011). Exploring the peak and end rule of past affective episodes within the exercise context. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology. 33(Suppl.), (pp. S155-S156). [Abstract]

Hodge, K., Lonsdale, C., & Rose, E. (2010). 'Firing up' or 'burning out'? Athlete engagement vs athlete burnout in elite sport. Proceedings of the New Zealand Sports Medicine+Science Conference. (pp. 61). Dunedin, New Zealand: Sports Medicine New Zealand. [Abstract]

Dewes, L., & Rose, E. (2009). Differences in affective responses to prescribed and self-selected exercise intensities in overweight women: The role of autonomy. Proceedings of the New Zealand Sports Medicine+Science Conference. (pp. 35). Dunedin, New Zealand: Sports Medicine New Zealand. [Abstract]

Rose, E., & Parfitt, G. (2009). Exercise experience influences affective and efficacy outcomes of prescribed and self-selected intensity exercise but does not influence the exercise intensity chosen. Proceedings of the New Zealand Sports Medicine+Science Conference. (pp. 68). Dunedin, New Zealand: Sports Medicine New Zealand. [Abstract]

Fowler, C., & Rose, E. (2009). An exploration of the motivational strategies used by personal trainers: Are they autonomy supportive? Proceedings of the New Zealand Sports Medicine+Science Conference. (pp. 44). Dunedin, New Zealand: Sports Medicine New Zealand. [Abstract]

Parfitt, G., Backhouse, S., Ekkekakis, P., Rose, E., & Sheppard, K. (2007). The exercise intensity-affect relationship: Theory into practice. Journal of Sports Sciences. 25(S2), (pp. S36-S39). [Abstract]

Rose, E. A., & Parfitt, G. (2006). The utility of the feeling scale to regulate exercise intensity. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology. 28(Suppl.), (pp. S156-S157). [Abstract]

Lonsdale, C., Hodge, K., & Rose, E. (2005). Burnout in elite sport: A self-determination perspective. Proceedings of the Association of the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology 20th Anniversary Conference. (pp. 42-43). [Abstract]

Parfitt, G., & Rose, E. (2005). A test of the tenets of the dual-mode model with sedentary women. Proceedings of the International Society of Sport Psychology 11th World Congress of Sport Psychology. [CD-ROM] Sydney, Australia: ISSP. [Abstract]

Rose, E., & Parfitt, G. (2005). A qualitative analysis of the affective experience of exercise. Proceedings of the International Society for Sport Psychology 11th World Congress of Sport Psychology. [CD-ROM] Sydney, Australia: ISSP. [Abstract]

Lucas, S. J. E., Cotter, J. D., Palmer, C. D., Rose, E. A., & Anson, J. G. (2005). Self-selected pace during very prolonged competitive exercise. Proceedings of the New Zealand Sports Medicine+Science Conference. (pp. 54). Dunedin, New Zealand: Sports Medicine NZ Inc. [Abstract]

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