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Dr Rosemary Overell

Rosemary Overell_186

BA(Hons) PhD (The University of Melbourne)

Lecturer

 

Contact


Office: Richardson 6C20
Tel: 64 3 479 5723
Email: rosemary.overell@otago.ac.nz

@muzaken
 Academia.edu

Background

Rosemary Overell completed a doctorate at the University of Melbourne in 2012. Her thesis, Brutal: Affect Belonging In, and Between, Australia and Japan’s Grindcore Scenes, explored how fans of grindcore metal music feel ‘at home’ in scenic spaces and was based on ethnographic research in Osaka, Japan and Melbourne, Australia. Before joining the department at Otago in 2013, Rosemary taught at the University of Melbourne in Cultural Studies.

Research Interests

  • Psychoanalysis / Lacanian theory
  • Gender Studies
  • Japanese and Asian Studies
  • Ethnographic methodologies

Rosemary Overell's most recent work considers how gendered subjectivities are co-constituted by and through mediation. She draws particularly on Lacanian psychoanalysis to explore a variety of mediated sites. In particular, she considers the intersections between affect and signification and how these produce gender. Rosemary has looked at media as varied as anime, extreme metal and reality television.

More broadly, Rosemary's research interests include gender studies, music subcultures and how affect can enable or curtail particular modes of gendered being and belonging for otherwise marginalised people. This was explored in her 2014 monograph, Affective Intensities in Extreme Music Scenes (Palgrave). She is also the co-editor, with Catherine Dale (Chuo University) of Orienting Feminism: Media, Activism and Cultural Representation (Palgrave, 2018), a collection which explores the meaning of feminisms in the contemporary moment as constituted by both action and uncertainity. Focusing on feminist media representations, the collection asks questions about how feminist subjectivity is articulated and intersects with media technologies and representation.

In addition to her academic scholarship, Rosemary writes regularly for The Conversation and has contributed to public debates on how gender and the media work in the contemporary moment.

Rosemary is a member of the Performance of the Real research theme steering group and leads the 'Mediating the Real' programme within the theme. She is also the co-editor, with Sarah Thomasson (University of Queensland) of the Performance of the Real: Working Papers series - a site for the circulation of dialogues, provocations and ideas arising from 'Real' events. She is currently co-running the Mediating the Real reading group with Brett Nicholls. This group primarily draws on Lacanian and Baudrillardian approaches to mediation of 'the Real'.

Rosemary is also on the editorial board of Metal Music Studies and Puratoke: Journal of Undergraduate Research in the Creative Arts and Industries.

Rosemary Overell welcomes PhD theses on any topics related to her research, including subcultural media, gender studies and psychoanalysis.

For more details, please see her full research profile below.

Teaching

Rosemary Overell has taught papers on digital media and identity, contemporary media studies, critical journalism studies and music cultures.

In 2018 she will teach 'Writing for the Media / MFCO 220' and 'Understanding Contemporary Media / MFCO 102'. In 2019, Rosemary will offer an Honours (400) level paper on 'Communicating the Self', which elaborates on critical media theories of identity production in the contemporary moment.

Conferences organised

trans/forming feminisms: media, technology identity (2015)

Performance of the Real: Postgrad and Early Career Researcher Symposium (2016)

Mediating the Real (2016)

Mediating the Real 2: Mediations in a Post-truth Era (2017)

Expertise and Public Engagement

Rosemary Overell is committed to pedagogy beyond the university and her role as a practitioner as a 'critic and conscience' in the public sphere. She has run short courses for the Dunedin Free University on feminism and gender; and surveillance and media cultures.

Rosemary collaborated with Melbourne-based artist Lisa Radford on Dear Masato, all at once (get a life, the only thing that cuts across the species is death at West Space in 2016. Rosemary has been an invited judge, and emcee, at the Dunedin Fringe Festival in 2016 and 2017. She ran a highly successful radio programme between 2013 and 2016 on 91FM Radio One called 'culture jamming'. This programme included interviews with academics, music practitioners and media workers on the intersections between music, culture and politics.

Completed supervisions

MA

Alison Cumming: Children of the Revolution: Bolan, Bowie and the Carnivalesque.

PhD

Massimiliana Urbano: Becoming-common: Affective Technologies and Grassroots Activism in Contemporary Italy.

Current supervisions

PhD

Bethany Geckle: Heteronormativity and the Cultural Interrelations of the Skateboarding and Drag Networks.

Hannah Herchenbach: Cultural Politics of the Dunedin Sound.

Peter Stapleton: The Punkumentary: Embodying a punk sensibility within the music documentary?

MA

Mikayla Cahill: Francesca Woodman and the Male Gaze

 
 

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Publications

Overell, R. (2014). Affective intensities in extreme music scenes: Cases from Australia and Japan. Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 224p.

Overell, R. (2016). Brutal masculinity in Osaka's extreme-metal scene. In F. Heesch & N. Scott (Eds.), Heavy metal, gender and sexuality: Interdisciplinary approaches. (pp. 245-257). London, UK: Routledge.

Overell, R. (2015). Brutal belonging in other spaces: Grindcore touring in Melbourne and Osaka. In S. Baker, B. Robards & B. Buttigieg (Eds.), Youth cultures and subcultures: Australian perspectives. (pp. 89-102). Farnham, UK: Ashgate.

Overell, R. (2015). The Nikkeijin underground in Japanese extreme metal. In C. Feldman-Barrett (Ed.), Lost histories of youth culture. New York: Peter Lang.

Overell, R. (2014). Intermediality and interventions: Applying intermediality frameworks to reality television and microblogs. Refractory, 24. Retrieved from http://refractory.unimelb.edu.au/2014/08/06/overell/

Authored Book - Research

Overell, R. (2014). Affective intensities in extreme music scenes: Cases from Australia and Japan. Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 224p.

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Chapter in Book - Research

Overell, R. (2016). Brutal masculinity in Osaka's extreme-metal scene. In F. Heesch & N. Scott (Eds.), Heavy metal, gender and sexuality: Interdisciplinary approaches. (pp. 245-257). London, UK: Routledge.

Overell, R. (2015). Brutal belonging in other spaces: Grindcore touring in Melbourne and Osaka. In S. Baker, B. Robards & B. Buttigieg (Eds.), Youth cultures and subcultures: Australian perspectives. (pp. 89-102). Farnham, UK: Ashgate.

Overell, R. (2015). The Nikkeijin underground in Japanese extreme metal. In C. Feldman-Barrett (Ed.), Lost histories of youth culture. New York: Peter Lang.

Overell, R. (2013). (I) hate girls and emo(tion)s: Negotiating masculinity in grindcore music. In T. Hjelm, K. Kahn-Harris & M. Levine (Eds.), Heavy metal: Controversies and countercultures. (pp. 201-227). Sheffield, UK: Equinox.

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Journal - Research Article

Overell, R. (2014). Intermediality and interventions: Applying intermediality frameworks to reality television and microblogs. Refractory, 24. Retrieved from http://refractory.unimelb.edu.au/2014/08/06/overell/

Overell, R. (2012). '[I] hate girls and emo[tion]s': Negotiating masculinity in grindcore music. Popular Music History, 6, 198-223. doi: 10.1558/pomh.v6i1/2.198

Overell, R. (2010). Brutal belonging in Melbourne's grindcore scene. Studies in Symbolic Interaction, 35, 79-99. doi: 10.1108/S0163-2396(2010)0000035009

Overell, R. (2010). Emo online: Networks of sociality/networks of exclusion. Perfect Beat, 11(2), 141-162. doi: 10.1558/prbt.v11i2.141

Overell, R. (2009). The Pink Palace, policy and power: Home-making practices and gentrification in Northcote. Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, 23(5), 681-695. doi: 10.1080/10304310903056328

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Journal - Research Other

Kavka, M., & Overell, R. (2016). Special issue: Mediating the real. MEDIANZ, 16(2), 1-5. doi: 10.11157/medianz-vol17iss2id205

Overell, R. (2014). Lorde vs Miley: Where young feminism meets old class bias. The Conversation. Retrieved from http://theconversation.com/lorde-vs-miley-where-young-feminism-meets-old-class-bias-22531

Overell, R. (2014). Gwar is over? The subcultural politics of thrash metal. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/gwar-is-over-the-subcultural-politics-of-thrash-metal-24789

Overell, R. (2014). Australia's first cat cafe: Stroke of genius or needless fluff? The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/australias-first-cat-cafe-stroke-of-genius-or-needless-fluff-26811

Overell, R. (2013). Change in packaging presents a fresh Miley Cyrus commodity. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/change-in-packaging-presents-a-fresh-miley-cyrus-commodity-17523

Overell, R. (2013). AKB48, headshaving and the sexual politics of J-Pop. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/akb48-headshaving-and-the-sexual-politics-of-j-pop-11995

Overell, R. T. (2012). [Review of the book Making music in Japan's underground: The Tokyo hardcore scene]. Japanese Studies, 32(2), 309-311. doi: 10.1080/10371397.2012.695177

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Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Overell, R. (2013). 'Brazilian / Japanese evil bastards': nikkeijin understandings of 'Japanese-ness' in Nagoya's grindcore scene. Proceedings of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia/New Zealand (IASPM-ANZ) Conference: Popular Music, Communities, Places, Ecologies. Retrieved from http://iaspm.org.au/iaspm-anz-2013-brisbane-program/

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Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

Overell, R. (2013, October). 'Brazilian/Japanese evil bastards': Nikkeijin understandings of 'Japanese-ness' in Nagoya's grindcore scene. Verbal presentation at the Edward W Said Symposium: Intellectual, Cultural Critic, Activist, Dunedin, New Zealand.

More publications...