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Dr Caroline Beck

Dr Caroline BeckBSc (Hons), PhD

Dr Caroline Beck is a developmental biologist in the Department of Zoology at the University of Otago.

She is interested in understanding the complex gene regulation required to “build” an animal from a single cell. Caroline's research lab has a particular interest in the development of organs, such as the vertebrate limb and eye, and the ability of some vertebrates to regenerate these organs. The work relies heavily on model animals to reveal how complex structures are built and – in the case of regeneration after injury – rebuilt. While most of the work uses amphibian models, such as Xenopus laevis (clawed frogs), the zebrafish fin is also used for complementary studies on regeneration.

Caroline gained a BSc (Hons) in Medical Biochemistry at the University of Birmingham and a PhD in Biological Sciences at the University of Warwick, before undertaking a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Bath. She has been at Otago since 2004.

Further information

Further information about Caroline is available on the Department of Zoology website.

Publications

Murillo, J., Campbell-Thompson, E., Bishop, T. F., Beck, C. W., & Spencer, H. G. (2023). Report of bilateral gynandromorphy in a Green Honeycreeper (Chlorophanes spiza) from Colombia. Journal of Field Ornithology, 94(4), 12. doi: 10.5751/JFO-00392-940412

Panthi, S., Chapman, P. A., Szyszka, P., & Beck, C. W. (2023). Characterisation and automated quantification of induced seizure-related behaviours in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Journal of Neurochemistry, 15836. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/jnc.15836

Hudson, D. T., Bromell, J. S., Day, R. C., McInnes, T., Ward, J. M., & Beck, C. W. (2022). Gene expression analysis of the Xenopus laevis early limb bud proximodistal axis. Developmental Dynamics, 251, 1880-1896. doi: 10.1002/dvdy.517

Karunaraj, P., Tidswell, O., Duncan, E. J., Lovegrove, M. R., Jefferies, G., Johnson, T. K., Beck, C. W., & Dearden, P. K. (2022). Noggin proteins are multifunctional extracellular regulators of cell signaling. Genetics, 221(1), iyac049. doi: 10.1093/genetics/iyac049

Chapman, P. A., Gilbert, C. B., Devine, T. J., Hudson, D. T., Ward, J., Morgan, X. C., & Beck, C. W. (2022). Manipulating the microbiome alters regenerative outcomes in Xenopus laevis tadpoles via lipopolysaccharide signalling. Wound Repair & Regeneration, 30, 636-651. doi: 10.1111/wrr.13003

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